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Work-Poor Households: The Welfare Implications of Changing Household Employment Patterns download ebook

Work-Poor Households: The Welfare Implications of Changing Household Employment Patterns download ebook
ISBN:
0707002257
ISBN13:
978-0707002255
Publisher:
Economic and Social Reseach Institute (ESRI)
Language:
ePUB:
1246 kb
Fb2:
1842 kb
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Rating:
4.6

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My bibliography Save this book. Frances McGinnity & Helen Russell, 2007. Work-Poor Households: The Welfare Implications of Changing Household Employment Patterns. Author & abstract. Callan, Tim & Keeney, Mary J. & Nolan, Brian & Maitre, Bertrand, 2004.

Work-Poor Households: The Welfare Implications of Changing Household Employment Patterns. The impact of women's changing work roles on household expenditures by married couples is analyzed for 1972-73 and 1984 utilizing data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CEX). One-earner households with a non-working wife (NWW) are compared at the same level of after-tax income to a dual-earner households in which the wife works part time (PWW) and to those with wives working full time (FWW).

Climate change may affect household welfare through a variety of chan-nels, and the emerging literature has focused largely on the impacts on agricultural productivity, given its close nexus with weather conditions. The earliest estimates of the impact of climate change on poverty, to our knowledge, are based on an integrated assessment model (IAM)-a general equilibrium model using microevidence to quantify the socioeco-nomic dimensions of climate change and aggregate those measurements to estimate net effects on national incomes.

Household employment inequality: defining the social policy issue. The concentration of joblessness at the household level can potentially exacerbate any existing inequalities among individuals. A comparative perspective on household joblessness. Policy implications and conclusions. Susan G. Singley Singley Associates. Paul Callister Callister & Associates. What are the social policy implications of the changing distribution of work across households? To answer these questions we draw both on international literature and on a newly developed household database from the New Zealand Household Labour Force Survey for the years 1986 to 2002.

Singley, S. G. and Callister, P. (2003) ‘Work poor or working poor? A comparative perspective on New Zealand’s jobless households’, Social Policy Journal of New Zealand, 2. .

Saraceno, C. (2015) ‘A critical look to the social investment approach from a gender perspective’, Social Politics, 22, 2, 257–69. Singley, S. (2003) ‘Work poor or working poor? A comparative perspective on New Zealand’s jobless households’, Social Policy Journal of New Zealand, 20, 134–55.

The working poor are working people whose incomes fall below a given poverty line due to low-income jobs and low familial household income

The working poor are working people whose incomes fall below a given poverty line due to low-income jobs and low familial household income. These are people who spend at least 27 weeks in a year working or looking for employment, but remain under the poverty threshold. In the US, the official measurement of the working poor is controversial. Many social scientists argue that the official measurements used do not provide a comprehensive overview of the number of working poor.

The authors model the household demand for child care, the mother's participation in the labor force, and .

The authors model the household demand for child care, the mother's participation in the labor force, and her working hours in Romania. Their model estimates the effects of the price of child care, the mother's wage, and household income on household behavior relating to child care and mothers working outside the home. They find that: Both the maternal decision to take a job and the decision to use out-of-home care are sensitive to the price of child care.

Changes in household structure, in the economy, and in.In this paper we use this contrast between the work poor and the working poor as a context for understanding New Zealand's patterns of household-level employment

Changes in household structure, in the economy, and in the employment patterns of men and women have contributed to these trends, which present new challenges to social policy makers concerned about the costs and benefits of various models of welfare provision and labour market regulation. In this paper we use this contrast between the work poor and the working poor as a context for understanding New Zealand's patterns of household-level employment. We explore three issues: Are household joblessness and the unequal distribution of paid work across households issues that social policymakers need to be concerned about?