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Ordeal by Hunger download ebook

by George stewart

Ordeal by Hunger download ebook
ISBN:
0671832069
ISBN13:
978-0671832063
Author:
George stewart
Publisher:
Pocket (July 3, 1979)
Language:
ePUB:
1163 kb
Fb2:
1641 kb
Other formats:
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Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

George Stewart's history of the Donner tragedy was a wonderful book when it was first published in 1936.

George Stewart's history of the Donner tragedy was a wonderful book when it was first published in 1936. but through this book I learned that it was a series of bad choices, some not their fault. having NO IDEA what was to come.

Ordeal by Hunger book. Among Americans anyway, you only have to say, ‘the Donner party’ and the immediate association is cannibalism.

George Rippey Stewart. Stewart's books about . highways were based on his cross-country drives of 1924, 1949 and 1950. 1895-05-31)May 31, 1895. Ordeal by Hunger, Pickett's Charge, and other works are examinations of American history, but are unusual in their probing of the interaction of human beings with their physical and social environments. His greatest achievement as a novelist, Earth Abides, takes somewhat the same perspective, but in the context of a collapse of civilization, in which everything formerly taken for granted about civilization and the situation of human beings in their environment can no longer be assumed.

Ordeal by Hunger - George R. Stewart. For information about permission to reproduce selections from this book, write to Permissions, Houghton Mifflin Company, 215 Park Avenue South, New York, New York 10003.

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by. Stewart, George Rippey, 1895-1980. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on June 21, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

by George R. The tragedy of the Donner party constitutes one of the most amazing stories of the American West. In 1846 eighty-seven people - men, women, and children - set out for California, persuaded to attempt a new overland route.

Published by Pocket Books, New York (1960). Stewart, George R (revisor). Published by Pocket Books, New York NY (1971). ISBN 10: 0671445987 ISBN 13: 9780671445980.

See page 41 for report on the epic poem, Snow Covered Wagons dealing with the same subject. It's a tragic and dramatic chapter in American history, and seems within the past year, to have caught the imagination of writers

See page 41 for report on the epic poem, Snow Covered Wagons dealing with the same subject. It's a tragic and dramatic chapter in American history, and seems within the past year, to have caught the imagination of writers.

Reviews:
  • Winasana
Great book of the American west a must read
  • Onaxan
I enjoyed this book! It is about history I won't spoil it, but definitely a good read and it does contain some gore! The title says it all.
  • Gavinrage
This book presents an account of the Donner Party, a wagon train of about eighty-seven people who in July 1846 started off for California via a new, untried route through the Sierras. Unfortunately, this particular wagon train of pioneers would go down in history due to the horror and tragedy that it was to meet along its way. Stranded in the Sierras amidst its harshest winter in years, with unparalleled snowfall and frigid temperatures, only little more than half, mostly women and children, were to survive their unbelievable deprivation and suffering.

This wagon train was a loose confederation of strangers who originally were part of another wagon train, but who collectively branched off by consensus to try a new, though untried and unproven, overland route through the Sierras that was alleged to be shorter. Their decision to take this new route was one that would haunt them for the rest of their journey, as it was not what it was purported to be. The inexperience of these travelers, the poor decisions that were sometimes made, and their seeming inability to truly unify as one entity contributed to their ultimate debacle. They were, after all, representative of humanity at large. Some of them were good, brave, and unselfish. Some were people with whom one would not wish to shake hands.

Beleaguered by thirst as they trekked across a desert, marauded by Indians along the way, plagued by the loss of necessary oxen and cattle, beset by accidents and personal squabbles that would sometimes turn deadly, they would finally reach the Sierras and begin their perilous crossing, only to find themselves snowbound at the summit while within sight of the pass that they needed to cross to be home free. Trapped by the weather in early November, they would set up a make-shift camp, never thinking about just how long their encampment would last. With minimal food supplies at their disposal, these intrepid, westward-ho emigrants would find themselves trapped for months, facing incredible hardships that would tax them beyond human endurance. Some would resort to cannibalism in order to survive.

This is a riveting story about survival of the fittest, about personal sacrifice, and human foibles. It is a story not only of those ill-fated pioneers but of those who would attempt to rescue them, often at great personal cost. It is a story that reflects the human spirit, both good and bad, in time of crisis. It is a story of often selfless heroism. It is also a story of greed and craven opportunism. While some of the book is politically incorrect, it is reflective of the times in which these pioneers lived, as well as that of when this book was first written.

It is, however, remiss that the maps included in this book do little to illustrate the deadly journey undertaken by these pioneers. Still, the lack of comprehensive maps does not unduly detract from the powerful impact that this story has on the reader. Moreover, although the book was published in 1936, the author, a trained historian, added a supplement in 1960, which is included in this edition of his book. This supplement serves to correct errors, as well as incorporate additional relevant material not available at the time of original publication.

Those who enjoy tales of survival will, undoubtedly, find this gripping tale well worth reading.
  • Kirinaya
This book presents an account of the Donner Party, a wagon train of about eighty-seven people who in July 1846 started off for California via a new, untried route through the Sierras. Unfortunately, this particular wagon train of pioneers would go down in history due to the horror and tragedy that it was to meet along its way. Stranded in the Sierras amidst its harshest winter in years, with unparalleled snowfall and frigid temperatures, only little more than half, mostly women and children, were to survive their unbelievable deprivation and suffering.

This wagon train was a loose confederation of strangers who originally were part of another wagon train, but who collectively branched off by consensus to try a new, though untried and unproven, overland route through the Sierras that was alleged to be shorter. Their decision to take this new route was one that would haunt them for the rest of their journey, as it was not what it was purported to be. The inexperience of these travelers, the poor decisions that were sometimes made, and their seeming inability to truly unify as one entity contributed to their ultimate debacle. They were, after all, representative of humanity at large. Some of them were good, brave, and unselfish. Some were people with whom one would not wish to shake hands.

Beleaguered by thirst as they trekked across a desert, marauded by Indians along the way, plagued by the loss of necessary oxen and cattle, beset by accidents and personal squabbles that would sometimes turn deadly, they would finally reach the Sierras and begin their perilous crossing, only to find themselves snowbound at the summit while within sight of the pass that they needed to cross to be home free. Trapped by the weather in early November, they would set up a make-shift camp, never thinking about just how long their encampment would last. With minimal food supplies at their disposal, these intrepid, westward-ho emigrants would find themselves trapped for months, facing incredible hardships that would tax them beyond human endurance. Some would resort to cannibalism in order to survive.

This is a riveting story about survival of the fittest, about personal sacrifice, and human foibles. It is a story not only of those ill-fated pioneers but of those who would attempt to rescue them, often at great personal cost. It is a story that reflects the human spirit, both good and bad, in time of crisis. It is a story of often selfless heroism. It is also a story of greed and craven opportunism. While some of the book is politically incorrect, it is reflective of the times in which these pioneers lived, as well as that of when this book was first written.

It is, however, remiss that the maps included in this book do little to illustrate the deadly journey undertaken by these pioneers. Still, the lack of comprehensive maps does not unduly detract from the powerful impact that this story has on the reader. Moreover, although the book was published in 1936, the author, a trained historian, added a supplement in 1960, which is included in this edition of his book. This supplement serves to correct errors, as well as incorporate additional relevant material not available at the time of original publication.

Those who enjoy tales of survival will, undoubtedly, find this gripping tale well worth reading.