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Colonial Voices: The Anglo-African High Romance of Empire download ebook

by Gerald Monsman

Colonial Voices: The Anglo-African High Romance of Empire download ebook
ISBN:
1889431559
ISBN13:
978-1889431550
Author:
Gerald Monsman
Publisher:
University Press of the South; First edition (February 15, 2010)
Language:
Pages:
286 pages
ePUB:
1740 kb
Fb2:
1522 kb
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Rating:
4.4

Gerald Monsman, a specialist in British and Anglo-African literature, Bertram Mitford is being rediscovered. But Monsman has gone further! He has written a couple of detailed overviews of the African romance.

Gerald Monsman, a specialist in British and Anglo-African literature, Bertram Mitford is being rediscovered. Mitford wrote many African romances that were extremely popular following the success of Haggard's KSM, but today he may as well have never existed.

The anglo-african high romance of empire. The role of the Anglo-African Writers' Club as an ideological center of journalistic opinions and literary narration is highlighted here. University of Arizona, USA). Gathering at monthly dinners in the Grand Hotel, London, these writers adopted the twin ideals of dispelling British ignorance about colonial life while stimulating literary activity in the colonies.

Krebs, Gender, Race and the Writing of Empire; Gerald Monsman, Colonial Voices: The Anglo-African High Romance of Empire (New Orleans: University Press of. .

Krebs, Gender, Race and the Writing of Empire; Gerald Monsman, Colonial Voices: The Anglo-African High Romance of Empire (New Orleans: University Press of the South, 2010). 16. Wendy R. Katz, Rider Haggard and the Fiction of Empire: A Critical Study of British Imperial Fiction (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987). Monsman, H. Rider Haggard on the Imperial Frontier: The Political and Literary Contexts of His African Romances (University of North Carolina at Greensboro: ELT Press, 2006), . oogle Scholar. 118. Morton Cohen, Rider Haggard: His Life and Works (London: Hutchinson & C. 1960), 18.

The German colonial empire (German: Deutsches Kolonialreich) constituted the overseas colonies, dependencies and territories of Imperial Germany. Unified in the early 1870s, the chancellor of this time period was Otto von Bismarck. Short-lived attempts of colonization by individual German states had occurred in preceding centuries, but crucial colonial efforts only began in 1884 with the Scramble for Africa.

Presents a comprehensive overview of African colonial and postcolonial history. Show all. Table of contents (52 chapters). Provides an invaluable reference for students and scholars of history and African studies. Includes fifty-two chapters from emerging and established across numerous disciplines in African history and African studies. Demonstrates how the field of modern African history has evolved and expanded since the mid-twentieth century.

Professor Monsman places Haggard's imaginative works both in the context of colonial fiction writing and in the framework .

Professor Monsman places Haggard's imaginative works both in the context of colonial fiction writing and in the framework of subsequent postcolonial debates about history and its representation. Like Olive Schreiner, Haggard was an Anglo-African writer straddling the moral divide of mixed allegiances-one empathetically African, the other quite English. The context for such Haggard tales as King Solomon's Mines and She was a triad of extraordinary nineteenth-century cultures in conflict-British, Boer, and Zulu.

Professor Monsman places Haggard s imaginative works both in the context of colonial fiction writing and in the framework .

Professor Monsman places Haggard s imaginative works both in the context of colonial fiction writing and in the framework of subsequent postcolonial debates about history and its representation. Like Olive Schreiner, Haggard was an Anglo-African writer straddling the moral divide of mixed allegiances one empathetically African, the other quite English. The context for such Haggard tales as King Solomon s Mines and She was a triad of extraordinary nineteenth-century cultures in conflict British, Boer, and Zulu.

Professor Monsman places Haggard's imaginative works both in the context of colonial fiction writing and in the framework of.

The book has scholarly value for the colonialist attitudes that Haggard . a b Gerald Monsman (e., King Solomon's Mines, Broadview Press, 2002.

The book has scholarly value for the colonialist attitudes that Haggard expresses, and for the way that he portrays the relationships between the white and African characters. Haggard portrays some African characters as barbarians, such as Twala and Gagool, but their barbarity has more to do with their roles as antagonists in the story than with their African heritage. He also presents the other side of the coin, showing some black Africans as heroes and heroines (such as Ignosi), and showing respect for their culture.

Five Books aims to keep its book recommendations and interviews up to date. Africa History Books Regional and National History Colonialism & Empire. Five Books interviews are expensive to produce.

Colonial Voices focuses on Anglo-African writers of the nineteenth- and early twentieth-centuries. There is a serious dearth of work on such late-imperial writers of popular romances and this study examines the history, cultural rituals, and beliefs that native-born and settler writers present in their novels and stories of Africa. It also brings an important and neglected figure back into the canon Bertram Miford (1855-1914). Such English fiction writers as Mitford, H. Rider Haggard, Olive Schreiner, W. C. Scully, John Buchan, Sol Plaatje, and others hold a unique position in English literature, inasmuch as their work engages with the conflicts between the indigenous and colonizing populations during the last great period of discovery and exploration. While sensitive to the controversies that arise when English writers utilize indigenous subject matter, this study makes a case for considering the perspectives of these colonial writers to be as valid, even if different from, the oral narratives of their indigenous counterparts. This look at the literary legacies of the departed British empire defines in a fresh way the social tensions of the imperial rise and decline. The role of the Anglo-African Writers' Club as an ideological center of journalistic opinions and literary narration is highlighted here. Gathering at monthly dinners in the Grand Hotel, London, these writers adopted the twin ideals of dispelling British ignorance about colonial life while stimulating literary activity in the colonies. Significantly, these goals express needs and themes that ominously presage the troubling issues of politics, love, and vocation that come to the fore in South African fiction of the later twentieth century. A growing interest in Africa over the last decade means that even the Anglo-imperialist speaking of and for indigenous Africans is no longer an unimportant voice from an insignificant corner of the globe. The aim here is to mainstream these writers so that in future they will be read alongside other Victorian/Edwardian novelists, not merely considered special-topic local colorists.
Reviews:
  • Ffan
There are all kinds of readers across the spectrum of the reading public. And many books and authors once in fashion drop from human consciousness altogether. In the 1880s, there were bestselling authors much as there are today, but human nature being what it is, before very long something like 95% of those authors were utterly forgotten. In other cases, they may not have been utterly forgotten ... just almost utterly forgotten. One such almost utterly forgotten bestseller was H. Rider Haggard. In the mid 1880s he had a couple of mega-hits--the African adventure novels KING SOLOMON'S MINES King Solomon's Mines and SHE She (Wordsworth Classics). During a 40-year career, Haggard wrote nearly 60 books. Then after about 1925, Haggard's name fell off the radar, though he wasn't totally forgotten because many public libraries usually kept copies of KING SOLOMON'S MINES and SHE laying about, and there were half a dozen or so movies based on these two works. However the grand irony of the existence of the movies is that it is the exceedingly and extraordinarily rare movie-goer who would be able to identify the author of the original novels!! And so it was for about 50 years, then in the mid-1970s, H. Rider Haggard enjoyed a minor revival and perhaps six or eight of his books became available from specialty publishers. At that time, some readers "discovered" Haggard and gravitated to his "romances," as exotic adventures were universally termed around the turn-of-the-century. This is of course wonderful, yet for every Haggard, a myriad of his contemporaries were forgotten. Some were very good writers.

Now, today, due to the efforts of Prof. Gerald Monsman, a specialist in British and Anglo-African literature, Bertram Mitford is being rediscovered. Mitford wrote many African romances that were extremely popular following the success of Haggard's KSM, but today he may as well have never existed ... except that Monsman has recently reissued many of his works, for example, the all Zulu saga THE KING'S ASSEGAI The King's Assegai: A Matabili Story), THE SIGN OF THE SPIDER The Sign of the Spider: An Episode (Valancourt Classics), and THE WEIRD OF DEADLY HOLLOW The Weird of Deadly Hollow, and others, all graced with informative serious and introductions that place Mitford into perspective in relation to Haggard and others of the day, such as John Buchan, along with discussions of the colonial politics contemporaneous with the romances of the day.

But Monsman has gone further! He has written a couple of detailed overviews of the African romance. The first was H. RIDER HAGGARD ON THE IMPERIAL FRONTIER: THE POLITICS & LITERARY CONTEXTS OF HIS AFRICAN ROMANCES. The wonderful followup to that enchanting study is the brand new COLONIAL VOICES: THE ANGLO-AFRICAN HIGH ROMANCE OF EMPIRE which compares and contrasts Haggard and Mitford with the spotlight on Mitford. For those who have already discovered Haggard, Bertram Mitford's books are must-reads. COLONIAL VOICES will cause you to discover who Mitford was and explain his role in Anglo-African literature at the turn-of-the-century. Discovering Mitford will be a day that you celebrate! As will be the day you discover COLONIAL VOICES. The sad fact s that history as recent as a century ago may as well be a nonexistent era on a nonexistent planet. So much changes so fast these days that history, literature, and historical perspective are utterly out of fashion. Gerald Monsman is bucking the tide with his passion and focus on Anglo-African literature, and bless him for this!
  • I love Mercedes
I've waited for just such an entertaining and convincing defense of the imperial adventure novel as this while teaching school for years in Canada and the U.S. This book is a fascinating vindication of such narratives looking at how words carry meanings in different contexts. With exeptional verbal panache "Colonial Voices" rehabilitates high romance by showing how conflicts and resolutions are character-based, not merely situationally controlled. "Voice," as everyone's first language, is more basic than "text." And so this book takes understanding these works toward a vastly more visceral level. Its writing style is complex yet supple, displaying a barely controlled impatience with the politically correct knee-jerk cult of academic self-righteous carping about the sins of our fathers. Oddly, it was the book's dramatic cover that first caught my attention, but its contents lived up to the image. The margins are generous and the blank end-sheet is perfect for notes (actually I found so many new ideas I could have used another sheet)! I believe the final pages, 267 to 286, present an incredibly charming analysis of the myth, "The Distribution of Animals," in which the "voice" of the Almightly is interpreted by both Zulu and colonial listeners, wonderfully illuminating the nineteenth-century world of my Boer (Uys) ancestors.