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Frostworld and Dreamfire download ebook

by John Morressy

Frostworld and Dreamfire download ebook
ISBN:
0445043768
ISBN13:
978-0445043763
Author:
John Morressy
Publisher:
Warner Books; First Edition edition (February 1979)
Language:
ePUB:
1848 kb
Fb2:
1244 kb
Other formats:
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Subcategory:
Rating:
4.7

Frostworld and Dreamfire illustrates the struggle of the Native vs. Progress, Corporations vs. Freedom and .

Frostworld and Dreamfire illustrates the struggle of the Native vs. Freedom and a little bit of Mysticism vs. Science. I really enjoyed the alien point-of-view of Hult and his struggle for survival. In a brief 186 pages, author John Morressy touches on the plight & culture of indigenous peoples, the arrogance of imperial overreach, and the mythic dimensions of existence in a vast & uncaring universe. Nowadays this would probably be hundreds of pages long, possibly stretching over more than one volume - and it wouldn't gain anything.

Frostworld and dreamfire. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station02. cebu on August 12, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

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Frostworld And Dreamfire (Paperback). Published May 1st 1980 by New English Library. Paperback, 176 pages. Author(s): John Morressy. ISBN: 0450046222 (ISBN13: 9780450046223). Book in the Del Whitby Series). Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780445043763. Release Date:February 1979.

John Morressy’s moving SF epic Frostworld and Dreamfire (1977) is set in the Del Whitby sequence (1972-1983) of novels which explore conflict and colonialism (humans and humanoid aliens) within the loose human Sternverein polity

John Morressy’s moving SF epic Frostworld and Dreamfire (1977) is set in the Del Whitby sequence (1972-1983) of novels which explore conflict and colonialism (humans and humanoid aliens) within the loose human Sternverein polity. Morressy has a clear, unobtrusive style and a knack for finding thoughtful sci-fi donnees

Frostworld and dreamfire. Morressy has a clear, unobtrusive style and a knack for finding thoughtful sci-fi donnees. As in the promising Under A Calculating Star (1975), enterprising arrogance is pitted against apparent backwardness. The scene is a forbidding semi-barbarian ""frostworld"" with synchronous days and years. The last survivor of the strange, metamorphosing ""Onhla"" species is struggling to rebuild his race, unaware that both the Onhla and an unfortunate human faction are headed on a collision course with the schemes of intergalactic traders and ruthless rulers. Authors: Morressy, John. We hope you enjoy your book and that it arrives quickly and is as expected. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Frostworld and Dreamfire by John Morressy (Paperback, 1980). Pre-owned: lowest price.

Reviews:
  • Shem
Great story continuing Morressy's Sternverein galaxy series of books, and good as a stand-alone story as well.

Retro Sci-fi: Faster-than-Light ships combined with low tech surroundings, gun-powder pistols and swords. The story is focused on people and situations rather than the tech. Frostworld and Dreamfire illustrates the struggle of the Native vs. Progress, Corporations vs. Freedom and a little bit of Mysticism vs. Science. I really enjoyed the alien point-of-view of Hult and his struggle for survival.

As a fan of the Sternverein story, this book foreshadows the development of that organization from a well-intentioned 'Protection of Merchants' theme toward the 'Scary Police State Enforcers' that they end up...
  • Gardall
"On the desolate frostworld of Hraggellon, the inscrutable Onhla tribe -- half human, half animal -- has flourished for centuries. Then, suddenly, a mysterious plague wipes out the entire Onhla population, leaving only one survivor, a youth named Hult.

"But is Hult really the last of his kind?"

This text from the inner flap gives the basic plot of this fine, neglected science-fiction novel, but it can't convey the harsh beauty & richness of the story. In a brief 186 pages, author John Morressy touches on the plight & culture of indigenous peoples, the arrogance of imperial overreach, and the mythic dimensions of existence in a vast & uncaring universe. Nowadays this would probably be hundreds of pages long, possibly stretching over more than one volume -- and it wouldn't gain anything. Too many writers have forgotten the virtues of the economical, concise narrative ... which ironically often offers more depth & complexity than any bloated "epic" or "saga" ever could.

That's certainly the case here. Morressey gives us a compelling story set against a distinctly realized background. More -- he offers emotional power in a conclusion that never fails to move me, no matter how many times I read it. Does it really deserve 5 out of 5 stars? Objectively speaking, it's probably 4 stars -- but for me, it's a very personal & subjective 5 stars all the way for an unjustly forgotten gem. If you're looking for a solid, gripping story with more than its share of lonely & haunting wonder, I heartily recommend this book!