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The finest judges money can buy, and other forms of judicial pollution, download ebook

by Charles R Ashman

The finest judges money can buy, and other forms of judicial pollution, download ebook
ISBN:
0840213166
ISBN13:
978-0840213167
Author:
Charles R Ashman
Publisher:
Nash Pub (1973)
Language:
Pages:
309 pages
ePUB:
1901 kb
Fb2:
1389 kb
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Rating:
4.5

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Charles Ashman's welldocumented dissection of the third branch of Government provides a perceptive and rare closeup of the inner sanctum of judicial life. Ashman is a young law professor turned author with a taste for political irony and a highly sensitive flair for popular biography. Last year his irreverent sketch of our strangelovian Secretary of State ( Kissinger-the Adventures of Super Kraut ) amused and alarmed readers around the world.

Ashman, Charles R. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

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Judicial canons date back to Deuteronomy. This book describes over seventy examples of judicial pollution and mentions a few (. ). One of the common offences among judges is income tax evasion (. Examples are Oklahoma, New Jersey, New York, and Illinois

Judicial canons date back to Deuteronomy. Examples are Oklahoma, New Jersey, New York, and Illinois. Chapter One is the "Black-Robed Mafia" and lists eight judges. Chapter Two is "The High Cost of Justice" and lists sixteen judges. Chapter Four is "The Sensuous Judge" and lists six judges. Chapter Five is "Court Jesters" and lists seven judges.

And Other Forms of Judicial Pollution. by Charles R. Ashman.

by Charles R.

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Los Angeles, Nash Pub.

More by Charles R.

book by Charles R. More by Charles R. Charles R. Ashman, Robert J. Wagman.

The Finest Judges Money Can Buy, and Other Forms of Judicial Pollution By Charles R Ashman 1973 Hardcover
Reviews:
  • Kupidon
How wonderful to review this great book in this time of a political judiciary. The urging of the political correct is not to question a judge, which itself is purely political. This book factually by date, time, name, type of corruption, other criminal conduct, and resolution lists judges and the locale of their crimes. From single judges (state and federal), to five Oklahoma Supreme Court judges at the same time taking bribes, to a U.S. Supreme Court Justice forced to resign (Abe Fortas) these crooks over 100 years to the time of the books writing in 1973 engaged in their corruption while on the bench. I, as a government employee, was involved in two judicial corruption cases while the judges were on the bench in California. One was selling decisions and the second was making book in the courthouse and removed from the bench. Three months later he was reappointed to another Judicial District and involved in asking for bribes and selling influence. Most judges earn respect but too many at all levels of the judiciary are corrupt. The corrupt Oklahoma Supreme Court justices influenced case outcomes over 20 years directly in perhaps a thousand cases and in thousands of cases due to stare decisis. This book demands careful scrutiny of the judiciary the same as we should not consider any government employee above reproach. The subject is very serious but the manner and style of the author is easy reading.
  • Ielonere
The Finest Judges Money Can Buy, Charles R. Ashman

The author graduated Cumberland University Law School in Tennessee, taught constitutional law and served as Asst. State Attorney-General. He appeared on many radio and TV shows. This 1973 book began as a research project. It tells about crooked judges taking bribes, kickbacks, and payoffs, or selling justice by appointing relatives or friends as receivers and executors. These are not new problems. The `Prologue' says there is a "pattern of conflicts of interest, chronic bribery, profound abuse of office, loathsome nepotism, infamous sexual perversions and pernicious payoffs". Is there an effective way to select judges? Election by the public, or appointment by elected officials (p.4)? Judicial canons date back to Deuteronomy. This book describes over seventy examples of judicial pollution and mentions a few (p.5). One of the common offences among judges is income tax evasion (p.6). Examples are Oklahoma, New Jersey, New York, and Illinois.

Chapter One is the "Black-Robed Mafia" and lists eight judges. Chapter Two is "The High Cost of Justice" and lists sixteen judges. Chapter Four is "The Sensuous Judge" and lists six judges. Chapter Five is "Court Jesters" and lists seven judges. Chapter Six is "The Corrupters" and lists ten judges. Chapter Seven is "Current Bench Warmers" and lists nine judges. Chapter Eight is"The Chicago Three". Otto Kerner had a distinguished reputation as US Attorney, county judge, Governor of Illinois in 1960, and a justice in the US Court of Appeals in 1967. In 1973 he became the first federal judge to be indicted, tried, and convicted while still in office (p.202). He bought racetrack stock at giveaway prices and gave racetrack owners favorable treatment. It shows the fallibility of granting lifetime judgeships (p.206). Journalists first uncovered this scandal from court records and other public documents.

Chapter Nine tells about three Supreme Court Justices. Samuel Chase was impeached for misconduct for injudicial conduct, coercing a grand jury, and political haranguing a jury. [Was he suffering from senility?] Abe Fortas was one of the most brilliant lawyers, and good friend of Lyndon Baines Johnson who appointed him to the Supreme Court in 1965. His nomination to Chief Justice led to Senate Hearings and an investigation into his actions (p.213). Fortas was paid for lectures from funds that came from friends and associations. Then they learned of a yearly donation from a corporate raider (p.215). He resigned. William O. Douglas was a young and liberal Justice. In 1969 they learned of an annual fee from foundations whose money came from Las Vegas (p.221). [Organized crime?] The House subcommittee found Douglas innocent (p.223).

Chapter Ten discusses the claim that lifetime appointment keep judges out of politics, yet these jobs are examples of patronage! These judgeships are awarded solely by friendship [or bought by the wealthy?]. There are examples (p.227). Appointment of political allies goes back to the original intent when Federalists tried to remain in power that way. Judges make policy decisions, and so politics make judges (p.232). The Department of Justice influences judicial promotions (p.233). The cure is "the election or rotation of all federal appointed judges" (p.235). Originally, state judges were appointed by the governor with approval by the legislature. From 1832 on judges were elected by universal suffrage in most states. [The flaw in the "merit plan" is its hidden control by the ruling class, and it ignores the effect of an unelected District Attorney.' The merit selection system only removes the voters from the process, which is anti-democratic. [It is more important to have fixed terms for review and renewal.] These pages criticize the "merit plan" since judicial decisions reflect a judge's legal and political philosophies (pp.242-245). They also establish precedents. Only election by the voters insures government by the people (p.246). There is no proof that a "merit system" works!