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The Fates Of Nations - A Biological Theory Of History download ebook

by Paul Colinaux

The Fates Of Nations - A Biological Theory Of History download ebook
ISBN:
0140225161
ISBN13:
978-0140225167
Author:
Paul Colinaux
Publisher:
Pelican / Penguin Books (1983)
Language:
Pages:
272 pages
ePUB:
1471 kb
Fb2:
1937 kb
Other formats:
mbr lrf doc lit
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

Paul Colinvaux's The Fates of Nations is such a book But beyond that, the book was written in 1979, so the even more astounding realization was that everything his theory predicts has borne out perfectly since the book's publication!

Paul Colinvaux's The Fates of Nations is such a book. Even so, the book's premise, that the rise and fall of all of the great empires of history has been the result of success at breeding and an overcrowding of societal "niche space," was preposterous enough that I was HUGELY skeptical from the first page. And then I started reading. But beyond that, the book was written in 1979, so the even more astounding realization was that everything his theory predicts has borne out perfectly since the book's publication!

The Fates Of Nations book.

The Fates Of Nations book. In this book, Paul Colinvaux develops an interesting ecological theory - which I try to summarize in the next paragraph – that he then uses to explain the rise and fall of the Greek and Roman empire, the success of the Mongol empire under Genghis Khan, the colonization of America by Europeans, the independence of the US from Europe and the empire-building endeavors of.

How Biological Is Human History?: Kant’s Use of Biological Concepts and Its Implications for History as Moral Anthropology. Economics and History: Books II and III of the Wealth of Nations. E. J. Harpham - 1999 - History of Political Thought 20 (3):438-455

How Biological Is Human History?: Kant’s Use of Biological Concepts and Its Implications for History as Moral Anthropology. Liesbet Vanhaute - 2011 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 14. American History in a Global Age1. Johann N. Neem - 2011 - History and Theory 50 (1):41-70. After Eden: History, Ecology, and Conscience. Michael Tobias - 1985 - Avant Books. Harpham - 1999 - History of Political Thought 20 (3):438-455. Edmund Burke's Ideas on Historical Change.

Pour history through an ecological sieve and you get what you might expect: some kernels of truth but a lot left ou. Some of the military history is fun, if derivative. On the whole, however, the book is pretentious, repetitive, and, to iterate, full of holes. Pub Date: Aug. 18th, 1980.

Pour history through an ecological sieve and you get what you might expect: some kernels of truth but a lot left out. For zoologist Colinvaux (Ohio State Univ. the rise and fall of selected states-is a function of a biological imperative: ""our unchanged breeding strategy.

New Biological Books. The Fates of Nations. A Biological Theory of History. Jane Oppenheimer, "The Fates of Nations. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Rethinking the Theoretical Foundation of Sociobiology. Wilson et al. A Symbiotic View of Life: We Have Never Been Individuals. Gilbert et al. The Conceptual Ecology of the Human Microbiome.

The Fates of Nations: A Biological Theory of History is a 1980 book by Paul Colinvaux, professor of ecology at. .

The Fates of Nations: A Biological Theory of History is a 1980 book by Paul Colinvaux, professor of ecology at Ohio State University. The book is a theory of history from an ecologist's perspective, arguing that the fundamental structure and constraints of human breeding habits can explain much of the ebb and flow of human history. Published 17 years before Guns, Germs, and Steel (and now out of print), it is broader in scope and more politically incorrect, dealing with and explaining such issues as the prevalence of infanticide throughout human history, and the rise of religion

The Fates of Nations: A Biological Theory of History is a 1980 book by Paul Colinvaux, professor of ecology at Ohio State University. The book is a theory of history from an ecologist's perspective, arguing that the fundamental structure and constraints of human breeding habits can explain much of the ebb and flow of human history

Release Date:January 1983. Publisher:Pelican, Penguin Books.

Release Date:January 1983. 42 lbs. You Might Also Enjoy. To Kill a Mockingbird.

The fates of nations. Published 1983 by Penguin in Harmondsworth. War and civilization. Originally published, New York, Simon & Schuster, 1980.

Bibliographic Citation. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1980. Adam Smith's "Theory" of Justice: Business Ethics Themes in the WEALTH of NATIONS . de Vries, Paul H. (1990-03). Related Items in Google Scholar.

Reviews:
  • Yndanol
Good prophetic book.
  • Shem
no comment
  • Awene
This book is a relatively undiscovered masterpiece (as are the other books by this ecologist). When it is published again it will be another masterpiece.
  • Zolorn
SOLD AS "FIRST EDITION" HAD REMAINDER MARK INDICATING THAT IT HAD BEEN RETURNED TO THE PUBLISHER AND WAS RESOLD.IT IS NOT AS ADVERTISED AND GROSSLY OVERPRICED. COLLECTORS DO NOT PURCHASE REMAINDER MARK BOOKS.
  • GawelleN
Once in a very great while, perhaps even just once or twice a decade, I will serendipitously stumble upon a book that hits me in the chest like a sledgehammer, and causes me to reevaluate everything I know about, well, everything. It is only the very rarest and most remarkable of books that can cause an actual paradigm shift in my core assumptions. Paul Colinvaux's The Fates of Nations is such a book.
It was recommended to me by a dear friend with whom I share many beliefs, political and historical. Even so, the book's premise, that the rise and fall of all of the great empires of history has been the result of success at breeding and an overcrowding of societal "niche space," was preposterous enough that I was HUGELY skeptical from the first page. And then I started reading. And I kept reading. And reading. And I could not stop.
Every objection I raised, EVERY SINGLE one was answered brilliantly, usually mere moments after the objection occurred to me. I tried, I really tried to disprove him. I couldn't. But beyond that, the book was written in 1979, so the even more astounding realization was that everything his theory predicts has borne out perfectly since the book's publication!
What's more, the book is written in an accessible, readable fashion, while putting forth points that made me question everything I have ever believed since I started thinking about such things.
Make no mistake, there is absolutely nothing politically correct or sugar-coated in Mr. Colinvaux's message; indeed, it is a very dark, at times even depressing one (possibly one of the reasons the book has fallen out of print). The contents are not for the squeamish. They are for the endlessly curious. Certainly for the historian. For those fascinated with war. And for those who desperately seek to understand our human condition.
This is one of the ten best non-fiction books I have ever read. I cannot, I truly cannot recommend it highly enough.
  • Hra
One of the most insightful and disturbing books I have read in recent years. Professor Colinvaux explains, in very lucid terms, exactly why the history of our species has unfolded the way it has, and why certain patterns have tended to repeat themselves. Ecological theory states that every species of animal has a specific profession or "niche", and only the human animal has figured out how to "change jobs" without becoming a different species altogether.The problem of mankind has always been how to improve and increase the professions of a nation's population while simultaneously packing in fresh job applicants through an unchanging breeding strategy of "make as many babies as you think you can afford". This dilemma, Colinvaux explains, has been precisely the cause of the conquests of Alexander, Caesar, Genghis, Napoleon, Hitler and the rest. The underlying problem has not gone away: the single greatest threat to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness is, according to the book, the continued overpopulation and impoverishment of the planet through the unchanging breeding habits of our species. As long as people keep having too many babies, the oppressions, pogroms, and great wars of history will unquestionably happen again and again. This is not a very happy or popular message for a politically-correct age (which is likely why the book is now out of print). It is however an important message, and one that is quite cleverly and convincingly delivered by Colinvaux. Anyone with an interest in history, science, and the future of the human race should make an effort to find and read this book.
  • grand star
Out of print, hard to come by. My library had it tucked away in their basement facility. But it is an important work. Any politician who has not understood the basic ecological laws driving human society, poverty and war--namely, continued population growth--should not be allowed to govern anyone. Colinvaux is thorough and drives his points home.
His treatment of the role of the Mongols alone is worth the read. Contrast this to the voluminous "Guns Germs and Steel" by liberal establishment darling Jared Diamond whose book was awarded, feted with a PBS special, yet contains NO REFERENCES to the Mongols!