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The Chomsky Reader download ebook

by Noam Chomsky

The Chomsky Reader download ebook
ISBN:
0394559568
ISBN13:
978-0394559568
Author:
Noam Chomsky
Publisher:
Pantheon; 1 edition (September 12, 1987)
Language:
Pages:
492 pages
ePUB:
1242 kb
Fb2:
1406 kb
Other formats:
lrf docx mobi lrf
Category:
Mystery
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

The Chomsky Reader brings together for the first time the political thought of American's leading dissident intellectual- arguably the most important intellectual alive ( The New York Times ). At the center of practically every.

The Chomsky Reader brings together for the first time the political thought of American's leading dissident intellectual- arguably the most important intellectual alive ( The New York Times ). At the center of practically every major debate over America's role in the world.

Most recent titles: The Responsibility of Intellectuals. In wide-ranging discussions with David Barsamian, his longtime interlocutor, Noam Chomsky asks us to consider the world we are leaving to our grandchildren : one imperiled by climate change and the growing potential for nuclear war. If the current system is incapable of dealing with these threats, he argues, it’s up to us to radically change it.

The Chomsky Reader book. At the centre of pratically every major debate over America?s role in the world, one finds Noam Chomsky?s ideas - sometimes attacked, sometimes studiously ignored, but always a powerful presence.

Chomsky’s role as a public intellectual has placed him at the forefront of the . Support Open Culture. We're hoping to rely on our loyal readers rather than erratic ads.

Chomsky’s role as a public intellectual has placed him at the forefront of the left-anarchist fight against neoliberal political economy and the . foreign and domestic policies that drive it. Whether those policies come from nominally liberal or conservative administrations, Chomsky asserts time and again that they ultimately serve the needs of elites at the expense of masses of people at home and abroad who pay the very dear cost of perpetual wars over resources and markets. Today we offer a collection of Chomsky’s political books and interviews free to read online, courtesy of Znet.

This is a list of writings published by the American author Noam Chomsky. The Chomsky-Foucault Debate: On Human Nature (with Michel Foucault). New York: The New Press, distributed by . What Kind of Creatures Are We?. Columbia University Press. See a full bibliography on Chomsky's MIT homepage. Logical Structure of Linguistic Theory

The Chomsky Reader brings together for the first time the political thought of American's leading dissident intellectual . NOAM CHOMSKY is Institute Professor (Emeritus) in the . Department of Linguistics and Philosophy.

The Chomsky Reader brings together for the first time the political thought of American's leading dissident intellectual . Chomsky is the author of many best-selling books, including the New York Times bestseller Hegemony or Survival, Failed States, Imperial Ambitions, What We Say Goes, and Hopes and Prospects.

We all know what Noam Chomsky is against.

You can only have more for yourself by giving it away to others We all know what Noam Chomsky is against.

To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

From Library JournalFrom the 1960s to the present, linguist Chomsky has been a prominent critic of American foreign policy, influential in radical and scholarly circles. This collection offers a broad sampling of Chomsky’s best writing on the subject. The essays are typical Chomsky: long, analytical, probing, and controversial. Some have appeared in earlier collections; others are expanded transcripts of recent lectures. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Noam Chomsky's Core Works. There are broadly speaking two types of books by Chomsky: books purposefully written as books with chapters that sustain an argument, and books that are made up of essays, lecture transcripts and interview transcripts. The following list of core works prioritises the former kind. If you're having problems reading Chomsky, you might want to switch to the latter to begin with. American Power and the New Mandarins (1969).

Talking About a Revolution: Interviews with Michael Albert, Noam Chomsky, Barbara Ehrenreich, bell hooks, Peter Kwong, Winona LaDuke, Manning Marable, Urvashi Vaid, and Howard Zinn.

547 Kb. Grammatical Theory in the United States: From Bloomfield to Chomsky (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics). Talking About a Revolution: Interviews with Michael Albert, Noam Chomsky, Barbara Ehrenreich, bell hooks, Peter Kwong, Winona LaDuke, Manning Marable, Urvashi Vaid, and Howard Zinn.

Political essays examine topics including equality, Soviet-American relations, the Vietnam War, and the conflicts in Central America
Reviews:
  • Swift Summer
It has been some years since I've read "The Chomsky Reader". I've read most everything Noam Chomsky has written over the years. I find his intellect penetrating and his methodology nearly inimitable. This copy was purchased by me, not for me, but for a young, (20 year old) friend at work. I had it sent directly to him. I don't know if anyone before has invested in his education in a similar way but I felt it an inexpensive effort to make him aware of something he might not find on his own. My own little "butterfly wing effect". Perhaps there will be no significant result but I doubt it will hurt. Maybe we might all consider gifting those we encounter in our lives, who might be receptive, with those authors, we find perspicacious and right minded. Noam Chomsky is a tweak to the intellect to those who are willing to venture an attempt. I trust that is how my young friend will respond. Perhaps in some small way, he will interact with the world differently as a result of my intervention and just maybe, this world will be a bit kinder to my grandchildren as a result, just maybe.
  • Yainai
The problem with these essays is that some of them were written a long time ago. The essay on the Palestinians dates from 1983, so its copious detail is almost irrelevant to current conditions.

This does not gainsay Chomsky's originality and superiority as a thinker. There is no one like him.
  • Jesmi
When I was a graduate student, I had read quite a bit in Chomsky's thinking about media, but not much further. I had certainly heard and read sound bites about his other opinions, but never got around to reading more of his work. When I came across The Chomsky Reader, it seemed like a good chance to remedy the lack and also to get a sense of what, if any, further reading I wanted to do in his body of work.

It also seemed like a good book for trains, planes and cars-- essays and pretty dense essays at that. I thought it had a good chance of lasting me for quite a while while traveling.

My reaction to the work was mixed. As always, I enjoyed the interview with which Peck prefaces the work. I also enjoyed the selections of essays on the Responsibilities of Intellectuals and Interpreting the World. In general, however, I got a lot less out of it than I expected and was honestly left with a lingering sense of disappointment.

Chomsky spends much of his political essays dissecting writers with whose points he is in disagreement. This is a normal trope, and not necessarily a bad one. When I read, say, Arendt discussing other writers on revolution I am interested in what she has to say even if I don't know the other texts as intimately as she does. But there's something about the way Chomsky goes about it that brings the Dutch idiom "ant neuker" (look it up) to mind. He seems much more interested in being right then he is in anything so banal as the interests of the reader. He often doesn't bother to draw his larger conclusions out again for examination, and contents himself with arguing with the absent author line-by-line. If I knew that author or the subject matter well, I suppose that it would be a valuable dialogue. But even though I have read a fair amount about, for example, the Spanish Civil War, I am not up for a blow-by-blow argument about what POUM did at precisely what point. This reaction may say more about me than it does about him, dunno. It feels kind of ironic since a lot of what he writes about is against the culture of academics and experts and for engagement of the normal thinker in political issues. The normal thinker may see Chomsky's welcome mat, but that barrier to entry is pretty darned high.

What bothered me more is that I was less impressed with his logical reasoning this time around. I had always admired his rigorous rationality. What I realize now is that I mistook the fact that he irritated everybody for evidence of truth and objective analysis. I noticed in these essays that the structure frequently went:

complex argument. subtle reference to past thinker that I have to look up. final summation: "So and so says such and such, but he's wrong. It isn't true."

Next paragraph.

He may be right that such and such isn't true, but he frequently doesn't build his assertion under with anything more than a smart tone and a flat conclusion. Also not terribly helpful for the reader.

This makes it sound as though I didn't get anything out of the essays. He's a smart guy, so-- of course-- I did. And none of my criticisms mean that he isn't right-- just means that he annoyed me, didn't convince me, and reminded me of a particularly obnoxious ex-boyfriend. YMMV.

(The fact that I would be reminded of an ex-boyfriend while reading Chomsky automatically disqualifies me from the club of people smart enough to read him, I believe.)
  • Vichredag
I hope you have plenty of necessary and emotionally powerful illusions to cling to my friend. Chomsky is a national treasure, whether one agrees with him or not. Where do they make people who can't see that?
  • NiceOne
There is no plot, this is a non-fiction book. Chomsky is a critic of our society, and is usually worth reading.
  • Nagor
Chomsky never asks you to take his word for it. He challenges existing beliefs and paradigms and refutes them, providing evidence of his assertions. You, as the reader, are invited to read what he writes, agree or disagree. Chomsky invites readers to question what information they are given and exercise simple reason and skepticism in evaluating that information.
The introduction to this collection of essays (and informative interview) is excellent. It provides a basic overview of Chomsky's philosophy (if you could call it that.) I felt that this book was basic reading, particularly for those who are new to Chomsky's works. In the introduction Peck writes that freedom and the process of indoctrination go hand in hand... and in America freedoms exist "within an ideological consensus that limits debate and protects powerful interests in ways all too similar to those in which obviously repressive societies operate." The entire book (and Chomsky's many other works) provide evidence of these statements. Chomsky is meticulous in combing for details and wants readers to release themselves from the mindlessness of taking information (or veracity of readily available information) for granted. Conventional media are seemingly free from having a burden of proof and need not provide any evidence to support their claims. This is not only the fault of media outlets. The media do what they can get away with. Discriminating, thoughtful readers seeking information should not accept that.
One of the most apt analogies Chomsky makes in the interview is that professional sports, as an example, are one means for deflecting attention from real and important issues. The layperson can argue and analyse football to death and feel comfortable making his/her own analysis of athletics. However, these same people see world affairs and politics as out of the realm of their experience and expertise and do not even attempt to learn about it. Naturally something is to be said for the fact that many Americans so not have interest in these affairs and are more interested in sports... but it is a cyclical and indoctrinated response. From a young age, Americans are indoctrinated to focus on what their favourite team is doing as opposed to what is happening in another part of the world.
An interesting thought to ponder (at least for me), though, is that in reading the older essays, Chomsky discussed the lack of access to unbiased information. I wonder if this has changed or even been revolutionised by access to electronic publications and communication and technology in general? Or is this just wishful thinking?