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Death Walks the Woods (A Francis Pettigrew Mystery) download ebook

by Cyril Hare

Death Walks the Woods (A Francis Pettigrew Mystery) download ebook
ISBN:
0060921366
ISBN13:
978-0060921361
Author:
Cyril Hare
Publisher:
Perennial (November 1, 1991)
Language:
Pages:
201 pages
ePUB:
1104 kb
Fb2:
1309 kb
Other formats:
txt docx docx mbr
Category:
Mystery
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

Start by marking Death Walks the Woods (Francis Pettigrew, as Want to Read . That Yew Tree's Shade' - originally published in 1954 - is a Francis Pettigrew mystery, and was published in the US as 'Death Walks the Woods'.

Start by marking Death Walks the Woods (Francis Pettigrew, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Francis Pettigrew, a former barrister and sometimes amateur detective, is plucked out of what promises to be a peaceful retirement in the Home Counties to deputise for the County Court judge. The proceedings offer him some unexpec 'That Yew Tree's Shade' - originally published in 1954 - is a Francis Pettigrew mystery, and was published in the US as 'Death Walks the Woods'.

Death Walks the Woods Paperback – 1981. Lawyer Francis Pettigrew, now retired, has been fortunate in his marriage. by. Cyril Hare (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Wife Eleanor, his wartime Pin Control secretary, young, intelligent, and infinitely resourceful, continues to surprise him. Only after marriage did he learn she was an accomplished violinist and the great-niece of a baronet. In the five Pettigrew novels the mystery plots are organically integrated with Pettigrew's life and career to the point that it would be impossible to imagine one without the other. Pettigrew is a modest, unassuming character.

Cyril Hare The Yew Tree's Shade - originally published in 1954 - is a Frances Pettigrew mystery, and was published in the US as Death Walks the Woods

Cyril Hare The Yew Tree's Shade - originally published in 1954 - is a Frances Pettigrew mystery, and was published in the US as Death Walks the Woods. The proceedings offer him some unexpected insights into the lives of the new neighbours that he has - until now - only observed through his field glasses. When the body of a penniless widow known for her good works is found on Yew Hill, a famous local.

Items related to Death Walks the Woods (A Francis Pettigrew Mystery). Cyril Hare Death Walks the Woods (A Francis Pettigrew Mystery). ISBN 13: 9780060921361. Death Walks the Woods (A Francis Pettigrew Mystery). The picturesque village of Yew Hill, Markshire becomes an idyllic retreat for Francis Pettigrew and his wife until Francis is suddenly summoned to sit in as the County Court Judge and an elderly neighbor is brutally murdered. Shipping: FREE Within .

Alfred Alexander Gordon Clark (4 September 1900 – 25 August 1958) was an English judge and crime writer under the pseudonym Cyril Hare. Gordon Clark was born in Mickleham, Surrey, the third son of Henry Herbert Gordon Clark of Mickleham, Surrey Hall, a merchant in the wine and spirit trade, Matthew Clark & Sons being the family firm. The socialist politician Susan Lawrence was his aunt. He was educated at St Aubyn's, Rottingdean and Rugby.

A Francis Pettigrew Mystery.

Francis Pettigrew's holiday turns to nightmare when he stumbles across a body on Boulter's Tussock – a rather alarming body at that, given to vanishing and reappearing in unexpected places. Untimely Death aka He Should Have Died Hereafter. A Francis Pettigrew Mystery.

The picturesque village of Yew Hill, Markshire becomes an idyllic retreat for Francis Pettigrew and his wife until Francis is. .Death walks the woods, by.

The picturesque village of Yew Hill, Markshire becomes an idyllic retreat for Francis Pettigrew and his wife until Francis is suddenly summoned to sit in as the County Court Judge and an elderly neighbor is brutally murdered. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

Reading Length provides a calculation for the word count of this book, find out how .

Reading Length provides a calculation for the word count of this book, find out how long it will take you to read! . The average reader will spend 3 hours and 21 minutes reading Death Walks the Woods (A Francis Pettigrew Mystery) at 250 WPM (words per minute).

death of a blackmailer the old flame as the inspector . Clark, Alfred Alexander Gordon Writing under the pseudonym: Hare, Cyril.

death of a blackmailer the old flame as the inspector said. 1 of 10 for author by title). Gordon Clark's pseudonym was a mixture of Hare Court, where he worked in the chambers of Roland Oliver, and Cyril Mansions, Battersea, where he lived after marrying Mary Barbara Lawrence (see Lawrence baronets, Ealing Park) in 1933.

The picturesque village of Yew Hill, Markshire becomes an idyllic retreat for Francis Pettigrew and his wife until Francis is suddenly summoned to sit in as the County Court Judge and an elderly neighbor is brutally murdered
Reviews:
  • Zeli
Lawyer Francis Pettigrew, now retired, has been fortunate in his marriage. Wife Eleanor, his wartime Pin Control secretary, young, intelligent, and infinitely resourceful, continues to surprise him. Only after marriage did he learn she was an accomplished violinist and the great-niece of a baronet. Now she has inherited a small village house in Yewbury from an aunt he never met. Yewbury is known for its woodland scenery and for the Victorian poet who made its yew trees famous in his day. Without the aunt's unexpected legacy, Pettigrew would have retired where he last practiced, in the town of Markhampton, but the Yewbury cottage and its setting were irresistible. Lifelong urbanite Pettigrew is developing a new taste for nature.

In his career Pettigrew had been less successful. His ambition to become a judge was never fulfilled, which left him feeling frustrated. Now at last he has an opportunity to sit on the bench, filling in for an ailing Markshire county judge, first in Didford, the market town nearest Yewbury, and continuing as long as he's needed. His first day as a judge is not satisfying, however. With postwar demand for housing still very high, he hears many cases involving possible evictions, in which he must decide whether to leave some landlord furious or some unfortunate family homeless. In one case particularly, that of widowed Mrs. Pink, who rents a cottage near Pettigrew's own, he is troubled by a sense that the whole truth did not come out in court.

As the court moves on from town to town throughout Markshire, Pettigrew begins to enjoy his new duties. A judge's work is always challenging and never boring. Returning home by train for the Easter break, he shares a railroad carriage with a prosperous looking man who seems vaguely familiar. He's an infamous financial criminal just out of prison for cheating investors out of many thousands of pounds, and he too is on his way to Yewbury, to visit a lady friend, Mrs. Ransome. Just a few days later, on Good Friday, the body of poor Mrs. Pink, a good woman known and respected for her selfless devotion to the church and other worthy causes, is discovered on a yew-covered hillside, her skull smashed by some sort of blunt object.

Cyril Hare wrote only nine mystery novels, but they are among the most perfectly realized of the Golden Age or any age. In the five Pettigrew novels the mystery plots are organically integrated with Pettigrew's life and career to the point that it would be impossible to imagine one without the other. Pettigrew is a modest, unassuming character. Hare, who was himself a lawyer and a judge, depicts Pettigrew's world as it appears before Pettigrew's own eyes and in his thoughts, conscious and subconscious. Pettigrew's special gift is for understanding how the subtler sort of criminal mind can actually tailor its crimes in order to use the law to its advantage, or at least try.
  • Dakora
THAT YEW TREE'S SHADE is known in the States as DEATH WALKS THE WOODS, but it seems it';s only available now under its original title, which might please the late Cyril Hare if he cared about such things. And since he used a pseudonym to mask his own real name, who knows how he would feel? Another novel featuring Francis (whom his wife Eleanor calls "Frank") Pettigrew, THAT YEW TREE'S SHADE is very much a Golden Age Detective special as it is so built on cracking the multiple alibis proffered by the chief suspects in a very English crime.

And it's also about finding the occluded motive hidden by one of the others and, if you ask me, that's pretty much the only bit of detection Francis Pettigrew manages in this novel, which is delightful in other ways of course.

The little village of Didford in mid-Markshire is arranged at the base of a steep yew covered hill, and Francis and Eleanor's new house has a grand view of the majestic scenery all the way up to the top. Hare's descriptions are a little confusing--when it comes to nature, he's no DH Lawrence and he's certainly not up to standards of John Cowper Powys--but apparently three paths lead to a central concavity halfway up the hill where the county constabulary is thinking of installing a trash barrel to put a spike in the increase in picnickers' trash strewn about. The villagers appear one by one--Mrs. Pink, the best woman in town and the church lady of the village--Mrs. Ransome, a divorcee who scandalizes the village with her wanton ways and her new houseguest, the notorious Humphrey Rose, newly released from a prison term give to him for his massive defalcation of the funds of hundreds of strangers--he's like the Ken Lay of England, but with a strange, mysterious charm Ken Lay never had. There's Godfrey Ransome, the 17 year old schoolboy in whom Frank takes first a fatherly, then a brotherly, then what seems like an amative interest. There's Todman and there's Wendon, who I don't have the time to tell you about.

Hare is great at establishing character, and I love what he's done with these people. The story itself isn't wonderful, and Hare makes us think that he's going to make much more use of a Thomas Hardy slash George Meredith figure whose memory haunts the Didford hillside. There's a Henry Spicer Museum that has some of the gloomy gus's relics in it, but Hare missed the kind of chance Robert Barnard would not have, to satirize the Victorians, and the novel suffers from a kind of bifurcated split in what's supposed to be funny, and what's supposed to be horrid.