cerkalo
» » Death and the Dolce Vita: The Dark Side of Rome in the 1950s

Death and the Dolce Vita: The Dark Side of Rome in the 1950s download ebook

by Stephen Gundle

Death and the Dolce Vita: The Dark Side of Rome in the 1950s download ebook
ISBN:
1847676553
ISBN13:
978-1847676559
Author:
Stephen Gundle
Publisher:
Canongate Books; Main edition (May 3, 2012)
Language:
Pages:
416 pages
ePUB:
1709 kb
Fb2:
1744 kb
Other formats:
doc mbr rtf lrf
Category:
True Crime
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

Dolce Vita casts fascinating light on the myriad colours and contradictions of Rome in the 1950s. Stephen Gundle brilliantly portrays the Rome of romance, luxury and glamour; the Rome of flowers, fountains and Vespas.

Dolce Vita casts fascinating light on the myriad colours and contradictions of Rome in the 1950s. It is Rome as a film set- embodied by Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck in Roman Holiday. But the murder of Wilma Montesi exposed the other side of this beautiful city: carnal crimes, sex, drugs, corruption and endless cover-ups. Stephen Gundle picks his way through the evidence to expose the foul underbelly of Rome in the 1950s – a place of bitter hearts and broken dreams. Stephen Gundle is an historian with specialist interest in modern Italy. His books include Bellissima: Feminine Beauty and the Idea of Italy and Glamour: A History. Professor of Film and Television Studies at the University of Warwick, he has also lived for many years in Italy, and is a contributor to History Today, Radio 4's Night Waves and the Italian press.

The author uses the Montesi case to explore "the dark side" of Rome in the years just after the end of World War II.

Ian Thompson Guardian). The author uses the Montesi case to explore "the dark side" of Rome in the years just after the end of World War II.

So what about la dolce vita of the title? This is his other idea: that the Montesi case was the authentic background to Fellini’s film of 1960. Gundle has already recounted the various points of reference along the way and that was enough

So what about la dolce vita of the title? This is his other idea: that the Montesi case was the authentic background to Fellini’s film of 1960. Gundle has already recounted the various points of reference along the way and that was enough. On page 305 he admits there is no direct connection between the Montesi scandal and Fellini’s La Dolce Vita.

Published by Canongate Books Ltd. 3 May 2012. Death and the Dolce Vita: The Dark Side of Rome in the 1950s. From the publisher: On 9 April 1953 an attractive twenty-one-year-old woman went missing from her family home in Rome. Other Titles of Interest. From the publisher: Stephen Gundle explains what glamour is, where it came.

Suddenly Italy, and Rome in particular, was the most glamorous place on. .Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Rome in the 1950s is remembered for the glamour of the dolce vita – the high life.

Suddenly Italy, and Rome in particular, was the most glamorous place on earth. But the murder of Wilma Montesi exposed a darker side of Roman life - a life of corruption, cover-ups and carnal pleasures. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

By the 1950s Italy, in the wake of Mussolini's brutal Fascist government, was in the process of reinventing itself

By the 1950s Italy, in the wake of Mussolini's brutal Fascist government, was in the process of reinventing itself. Suddenly Italy, Rome in particular, was the most glamorous place on earth. But the murder of Wilma Montesi exposed a darker side of Roman life-a life of corruption, cover-ups and carnal pleasures. Book Description: The true story of Italy's most infamous murder, and the scandal that rocked the country

The Dark Side of Rome in the 1950s. Dolce Vita casts fascinating light on the myriad colours and contradictions of Rome in the 1950s. Books related to Death and the Dolce Vita. The Inheritance of Rome.

The Dark Side of Rome in the 1950s.

Paperback Books Stephen Hunter 1950-1999 Publication Year. His books include Bellissima: Feminine Beauty and the Idea of Italy and Glamour: A History

Paperback Books Stephen Hunter 1950-1999 Publication Year. On 9 April 1953 an attractive twenty-one-year-old woman went missing from her family home in Rome. Country of Publication.

Электронная книга "Death and the Dolce Vita: The Dark Side of Rome in the 1950s", Stephen Gundle

Электронная книга "Death and the Dolce Vita: The Dark Side of Rome in the 1950s", Stephen Gundle. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Death and the Dolce Vita: The Dark Side of Rome in the 1950s" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

On 9 April 1953 an attractive twenty-one-year-old woman went missing from her family home in Rome. Thirty-six hours later her body was found washed up on a neglected beach. Some said it was suicide; others, a tragic accident. But as the police tried to close the case, darker rumours bubbled to the surface. Could it be that the mysterious death of this quiet, conservative girl was linked to a drug-fuelled orgy, involving some of the richest and most powerful men in Italy?
Reviews:
  • Jum
This is a rare work of social history that's as elegantly written, absorbing and suspenseful as a first-rate mystery novel. In it the author explores in fascinating detail the circumstances surrounding the death, in April of 1953, of an attractive, 21-year-old Roman girl named Wilma Montesi, whose semi-clothed corpse was found on a deserted stretch of beach at Torvaianica, south of Ostia. But this wasn't just another insignificant death--the case quickly escalated into a nation-wide Italian obsession known as "the Montesi affair." As if Wilma's body were a rock dropped into a deep, dark pool, the impact of it rippled outward to involve increasing numbers of prominent people in the complex world of post-war Italian politics, in Church circles, and in the demimonde of the arts.

Although Wilma's furiously respectable, lower middle class family clung to the image of the girl as an angelic innocent, rumors began to circulate that she may have been quite different from the picture her family offered. Why would a nice girl from the northern part of Rome have gone by public transportation all the way south to Ostia on a cold, blustery day? How had her body wound up even further south, at Torvaianica? Where were the rest of her clothes? Had she drowned by accident, or was she murdered? And why were the police eager to close the case? Had the girl been perhaps involved in illicit activities with people so important the police knew better than to pursue them?

The author uses the Montesi case to explore "the dark side" of Rome in the years just after the end of World War II. The 1950s, often presented as Italy's inspiring decade of post-war resurgence, was also a time when criminal activity flourished, and when Rome became the world capital of "la dolce vita," the sweet life that was another name for decadence, drug use, and every kind of illicit sexual activity. This was the life led by the rich and their hangers-on, along with eccentrics, artists, movie stars and young women hoping to become stars, and flaunted in the cafés and nightclubs lining the famous Via Veneto.

But it also went on in private, in luxurious apartments and secluded villas, such as one called Capocotta, located near where Wilma's body was found. A shady entrepreneur, property speculator, seducer and pseudo-aristocrat named Ugo Montagna rented Capocotta, and he had a far-flung network of connections that included not only denizens of Via Veneto, but that also went deep into the political structure of Italy, and Rome in particular. Once the Montesi story touched Montagna, the popular press was all over the case, and lurid tales of orgies involving prominent political figures began circulating. Had Wilma been part of that scene?

Efforts to resolve the Montesi case went on for years, and the author takes us on a vivid journey through that process, a journey that includes a look at the less than sweet aspects of "la dolce vita," and that reveals the persistence of class prejudices in Italy, as well as pervasive official corruption that makes the present Berlusconi circus seem pretty tame. Gundle has his own, well-reasoned theory about what really happened to Wilma Montesi, but I won't spoil the ending by revealing it.
  • Maximilianishe
A young woman is found dead on a deserted beach. The obvious question is whether her death was the result of accident, suicide or homicide. Suicide was unlikely and accident was absurd. Nevertheless, through thick and thin, the authorities clung to accident. Homicide is most plausible, but why and who remain elusive. The mystery was played out in a city where official corruption, moral depravity and greed were rife. The author skillfully blends a murder mystery with colorful social history to produce a compelling story. His proffered solution is plausible but lacks evidentiary support.
  • Hirah
This is more than just a 'true crime' book. It is a fascinating picture of post-war Italy during the period captured by Fellini in his famous film about the high life in Rome. Any reader familiar with more recent Italian life and politics will discern striking resonances with the worst of the Berlusconi era. A terrific read.
  • lubov
The other reviews say it very well. This is a compelling piece of work, executed with cinematic brilliance. From the lonely death of one Roman shopgirl, the author illuminates the entire world of post-war Italy. Absolutely riveting.
  • Awene
arrived in brand new condition
  • Winn
This is an interesting book. It's 1953 in Italy, and a young woman is found dead on a beach. Murder? Suicide? Accident? The police must investigate. Before you know it, her death and the ensuing media frenzy become a brilliant metaphor for post-war Italian society, politics, religion, and culture.

It takes a while for us to get all the way to Fellini and his "La Dolce Vita" film, but we do get there, and it's a fascinating journey. There are very detailed discussions of politics, religion, film, wealth, and celebrity worship, The author makes his points and they come across as totally valid.

There are two good sections of pictures. Sometimes, I had to guess at the meanings of the British slang. And I had no idea that "span" is the archaic past tense of "spin" (picture captions after p. 148), but I wonder why our author felt the need to use it. We are told (p. 280) that Ava Gardner was born in Ohio. Nope, She was born in North Carolina. So with an error like that, I wondered if everything else given as fact was really correct. But still, this is a great read that unfolds like a good police drama. I can fully recommend it to anyone who wants a detailed look at life in Rome after World War II.