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The Rabbi's Daughter download ebook

by Reva Mann

The Rabbi's Daughter download ebook
ISBN:
0385341423
ISBN13:
978-0385341424
Author:
Reva Mann
Publisher:
The Dial Press (October 30, 2007)
Language:
Pages:
368 pages
ePUB:
1580 kb
Fb2:
1309 kb
Other formats:
rtf lrf azw lit
Category:
Specific Groups
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.7

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I just finished reading The Rabbi's Daughter and I recommend it highly. I am Christian but have always been interested in learning about the Jewish religion

I just finished reading The Rabbi's Daughter and I recommend it highly. I am Christian but have always been interested in learning about the Jewish religion. Reva Mann's story gave me such an intimate look into the religion and I am grateful. That is life, most stories do not have perfect happy endings. But Ms. Mann grew so much during the book that I think there was closure because she was able to take from each of her lives and create a life that she felt good about.

The Rabbi's Daughter book. I kept wanting to tell her to grow a pair and not be so dependent on a man that she had to change her own identity. Having said that, Ms. Mann is a decent writer and her story was interesting enough that I wanted to keep reading. I just wish she had more kojones.

About The Rabbi’s Daughter. In this honest, daring, and compulsively readable memoir, Reva Mann paints a portrait of herself as a young woman on the edge-of either revelation or self-destruction. The daughter of a highly respected London rabbi, Reva was a wild child, spiralling into a whirlwind of sex and drugs by the time she reached adolescence. But as a young woman, Reva had a startling mystical epiphany that led her to a women’s yeshivah in Israel, and eventually to marriage to the devoutly religious Torah scholar she thought would take her to ever greater heights of spirituality.

Brutally honest, beautifully written, THE RABBI'S DAUGHTER is the compulsive story of a woman trying to find love, and struggling to make peace with her faith, her parents, and ultimately herself. Reva Mann was a wild child. When, years later, Reva decides she wants to return to her Jewish faith, she.

In this honest, daring, and compulsively readable memoir, Reva Mann paints a portrait of herself as a young woman on the edge-of either revelation or self-destruction. Ricocheting between extremes of rebellion and piety, she is on a difficult but life-changing journey to inner truth. The journey began with an unhappy childhood in a family where religion set the tone and deviations from it were not allowed.

The Rabbi's Daughter is an historical novel that takes us back to the years of Emperor Nero. But soon it becomes apparent that their visit may have a very different purpose. Peter and Paul have been executed in Rome. The Community of Jesus' Way is struggling. The two men come to Ephesus to interview Mary, who lives in the hills above the metropolis. The Rabbi's Daughter will give all readers a new appreciation and understanding of Mary, an extraordinary woman. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

An excerpt from The Rabbi's Daughter. I have been celibate for nine months now, and I am determined that the next time I engage in relations with a man it will be with my husband, God willing a Torah scholar, on my wedding night. But today, even though I try to concentrate on study, the pages blur in front of my eyes and memories force their way into my consciousness.

The angels call him the righteous ma. Get notified when The Righteous Man's Daughter: Book 1 is updated.

The angels call him the righteous man. The demons call him that too. Sam calls him a brother at least.

In this honest, daring, and compulsively readable memoir, Reva Mann paints a portrait of herself as a young woman on the edge—of either revelation or self-destruction. Ricocheting between extremes of rebellion and piety, she is on a difficult but life-changing journey to inner truth.The journey began with an unhappy childhood in a family where religion set the tone and deviations from it were not allowed. But Reva, a granddaughter of the head of the Rabbinic Council of Israel and daughter of a highly respected London rabbi, was a wild child and she rebelled, spiralling into a whirlwind of sex and drugs by the time she reached adolescence.As a young woman, however, Reva had a startling mystical epiphany that led her to a women’s yeshivah in Israel, and eventually to marriage to the devoutly religious Torah scholar who she thought would take her to ever greater heights of spirituality. But can the path to spiritual fulfillment ever be compatible with the ecstasies of the flesh or with the everyday joys of intimacy and pleasure to which she is also strongly drawn? With unflinching candor, Reva shares her struggle to carve out a life that encompasses all the impulses at war within herself.An eye-opening glimpse into the world of the ultra-Orthodox and their elaborately coded rituals for eating, sleeping, bathing, and lovemaking, as well as a deeply personal rumination on identity, faith, and self-acceptance, this is at its heart a universal story. For those of any faith who have grappled with their own spiritual longings, and for anyone fascinated by traditional religion and its role in modern society, Reva Mann’s chronicle of a journey toward redemption is an unforgettable read.
Reviews:
  • Sha
This book was written with a lot of insight into how one girl viewed her life as a Rabbi's daughter. The ups and downs of this position were shown with a lot of feeling. How the daughter rebelled, how her life turned out and how she dealt with it. She went from one fold of her religion to another. If I told you any more details, I might as well give away the entire story. I enjoyed this well-written story very much and would recommend it.
  • Bys
I honestly wish I hadn't read it, but I kept waiting for the author to go to a therapist and realize that she was as self-involved as her parents. That never happened. Instead at each stage she thinks she has her life all figured out and then, oops, she doesn't. I get that it's hard to figure out life and that it's hard being raised by emotionally unavailable parents. Her self-analysis was just grating to read about. You have problems? Go see a professional! The dedication was to a doctor. I hope he was a therapist.
  • BlackHaze
While I was eager to read this memoir, I was very disappointed in the language Reva Mann chose whenever she felt she needed to describe her sexual encounters. These sections not only turned me off, but also frequently disgusted me. On the other hand, Ms. Mann’s description of life, particularly marriage and the raising of children within the ultra orthodox Jewish community is accurate, so for those unfamiliar with both law and tradition, the book is quite informative. Her personal struggles with her rabbinic father, anxious mother, even more anxious husband, and her dear, disabled sister all indicate that anyone can face these life challenges, and not solely due to the demands and expectations placed upon members of the ultra orthodox Jewish community. One can find sympathy for the author , but establishing the respect she desperately sought was difficult for me to find due to her shocking sexual descriptions; these were so unnecessary in her effort to drive home her point.
  • Zulkishicage
I liked this book but there was a lot in it that shocked me. I am Jewish and found the parts about Hassidic customs to be fascinating. I just wondered what kind of mother Reva Mann was when she subjected her children to her sexual partner. The book was funny in spots, compelling in spots. I recommend this book. I think the author was a little too explicit.
  • Westened
I just finished reading The Rabbi's Daughter and I recommend it highly. I am Christian but have always been interested in learning about the Jewish religion. Reva Mann's story gave me such an intimate look into the religion and I am grateful. I felt the desire she had to be part of something and feel loved while at the same time feeling things were not quite right. The struggles she had with her family were so painful and I felt deeply for her. I was surprised at the negative reviews saying there was no closure with the book. That is life, most stories do not have perfect happy endings. But Ms. Mann grew so much during the book that I think there was closure because she was able to take from each of her lives and create a life that she felt good about. It took great strength to share her personal story so openly and I thank her for that.
  • Braendo
Spoilers are included.

This book is not memorable for it's literary style. The writing is mediocre. The story is one you hear more and more frequently, about life as a woman in the ultra Orthodox Jewish world. Most of them say pretty much the same things, and each tends to confirm the other's story. A woman's goal and value is in her ability to bear and raise children, and create a Torah home for her Torah student husband. The unfortunate representations of marital sexual relations do back up those nasty rumors that have been going around. Of course, all the Orthodox people who review the book say, "But that's not the way it is!" And maybe it isn't for everyone, but certainly often enough for it to be a common occurrence when people finally feel free to talk about it without having to make it pretty "for the goyim". (Non-Jews or, to the ultra Orthodox, Jews who are not ultra Orthodox) Also, as a memoir rather than a study of Judaism, remember that the impression of Judaism is the author's, and is not intended as a well rounded exploration of Judaism. It doesn't need to be; after all, it's a memoir. This concept seems to be difficult for some people to grasp.

Unfortunately, I had almost no ability to relate to the author. She's unlikable. Her expectations are unreal, and therefore doomed to fail. I was particularly dismayed by her apparent lack of concern about the effects of her behavior on her children, when those effects were not going unnoticed by her. She is a person who is stimulated by extremes and novelty, so the likelihood that she is going to find deep satisfaction in a religion based on structured minutia is a predictable failure. Yes, she went to an extreme form of Judaism, but the more extreme the Judaism, the more regimented it is.

Finally, I found it confusing. The Orthodox Judaism she describes her father practicing in England is not what I recognize as Orthodox Judaism in the USA. Too liberal for what I would have considered Orthodox, too conservative for what I'd understand as Conservative. Perhaps the era, or perhaps the categories are simply different. But the family observances seemed to conflict, which jarred me each time and made me unable to simply go along with the narrative.

Very explicit descriptions of sex and drug use.

In addition to "The Rabbi's Daughter", I have recently read "Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection of my Hasidic Roots", also a memoir, and "Hush", a novel based on the experiences of a Hasidic woman. They tell similar stories of girls and women in restrictive ultra Orthodox Jewish communities. Of the three, however, I strongly recommend "Hush" by Eishes Chayil. Although a novel, it paints the clearest and most well balanced portrait of a society which has serious, dangerous flaws, but also beauty. The writing is brilliant, and the story emotionally stunning. Spend your time with the five stars instead of the three.
  • Ungall
Masterfully written, this autobiography is so raw in its honesty. A person, a young person, a girl who has to go through so much in order to find her real calling - it's heartbreaking.
You can learn about tradition, customs of the orthodox Jews, and it is very interesting, to learn and understand a different culture. The Author writes in a nice, sophisticated language. I like this book very much.