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Hidden Journey a Spiritual Awakening download ebook

by Andrew Harvey

Hidden Journey a Spiritual Awakening download ebook
ISBN:
0747509042
ISBN13:
978-0747509042
Author:
Andrew Harvey
Publisher:
Trafalgar Square (June 6, 1991)
Language:
Pages:
240 pages
ePUB:
1751 kb
Fb2:
1363 kb
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Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

Hidden Journey: A Spiritual Awakening Paperback – April 1, 1992

Hidden Journey: A Spiritual Awakening Paperback – April 1, 1992. by. Andrew Harvey (Author). Hidden Journey reminds me of the Joan Osborne song "If God Were One Of U. It tells the story of Andrew Harvey's nine years of spiritual growth while a pupil of Mother Meera, an woman who claims to be an incarnation of God on Earth. He meets Meera at the Aurobindo ashram in Pondicherry at the end of 1978 when he is 27 and she is 18. She has been brought there by Mr. Reddy, an Indian who had been seeking the Mother Goddess his whole life and discovered Meera when she was an 11 year old servant in his in-laws' home.

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Hidden journey : a spiritual awakening. Harvey, Andrew, 1952-. Harvey, Andrew, 1952-, Meera, Mother, 1960-, Spiritual life, Spiritual biography. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by booksale-cataloger7 on September 26, 2011.

Andrew Harvey has a gift for spiritual experiencea-an openness and attunement to the surprising manifestations of the Divine in. .

Andrew Harvey has a gift for spiritual experiencea-an openness and attunement to the surprising manifestations of the Divine in the contemporary world-and also the rare ability to render it as real in his writing. We learn in his new book, Hidden Journey, that Harvey’s dramatic spiritual awakening began several years before he met the Rinpoche; that in fact he believes he was led to the Tibetan master through the guidance of an even more powerful guru who he made no mention of in A Journey in Ladakh because she was still too profound a mystery to. me to begin to speak of her.

At the age of 25, Andrew Harvey abandoned a career at Oxford to return to his native India.

I love the detailed and specific ways in which Andrew Harvey writes about his experiences on a spiritual journey which appears to be aided by his guru, Mother Meera: but see the later autobiographical work, Sun at Midnight, to get another perspective on Meera.

Hidden journey: a spiritual awakening. Harvey's astonishing journey will make readers envious. Born in India and abandoned by his mother at six, Harvey was sent to boarding schools in India and England

Hidden journey: a spiritual awakening. Born in India and abandoned by his mother at six, Harvey was sent to boarding schools in India and England. His experience as an Anglo-Indian.

Andrew Harvey (born 1952) is a British author, religious scholar and teacher of mystic traditions, known primarily for his popular nonfiction books on spiritual or mystical themes, beginning with his 1983 A Journey in Ladakh

Andrew Harvey (born 1952) is a British author, religious scholar and teacher of mystic traditions, known primarily for his popular nonfiction books on spiritual or mystical themes, beginning with his 1983 A Journey in Ladakh. He is the author of over 30 books, including, The Hope, A Guide to Sacred Activism, The Direct Path, the critically acclaimed Way of Passion: A Celebration of Rumi, The Return of the Mother and Son of Man. He was the subject of the 1993 BBC documentary "The Making of a Modern Mystic" and is the founder of the. Sacred Activism movement.

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item 7 HIDDEN JOURNEY : A SPIRITUAL AWAKENING by Harvey, Andrew Paperback Book The -HIDDEN JOURNEY : A SPIRITUAL AWAKENING by Harvey, Andrew Paperback Book The. £. 9.

At book's end, ""Ma"" has settled with a few followers in Thalheim, Germany; Harvey continues as a faithful, albeit .

At book's end, ""Ma"" has settled with a few followers in Thalheim, Germany; Harvey continues as a faithful, albeit struggling, devotee. Absolutely mind-boggling revelations by acclaimed novelist and travel writer Harvey (Burning Houses, 1986; A Journey in Ladakh, 1983, et. of his secret religious life as a devotee of ""the Divine Mother. More exactly-as Harvey explains in a voice that quivers with emotion-he worships a lovely young Indian woman named Meera, who, Harvey says, happens to be an incarnation of the Divine Mother and a harbinger of ""the coming great transformation.

At the age of 25, Andrew Harvey abandoned a career at Oxford to return to his native India. This is an account of the spiritual transformation of the author of "Journey in Ladakh", "Burning Houses" and "The Web".
Reviews:
  • Arcanefire
This is an amazing story of a dedicated spiritual seeker who is trying to figure out how to live in this world but not of it. I found it very inspirational. Having lived in both the Eastern and Western worlds, Andrew Harvey has a unique perspective on how to incorporate Eastern spiritual practices as a Westerner. As a member of a Religious Science community, this relates very much to my interests. I read "Dialogues With a Modern Mystic" first and had to come back and learn the beginning of the story. I highly recommend both of them.
  • Mettiarrb
I am always fascinated by details of the spiritual quest. Enjoyed the book very much. Very well written.
  • Mr.jeka
A good deal for the price.
  • Andromathris
An excellent book to read about a spiritual awakening. Reading it changed my life and encouraged me to travel to germany to meet Mother Mera
  • Delalbine
This reviewer is aware of the authors current equivocation about the book but believes that whatever private agreements or disagreements he and Ma may have is their personal business and do not belong in the review. The book speaks for itself as it was written.
I have looked at a sampling of his other autobiographical works and find that this one far and away outclasses them all. The others might as well not even exist in my mind. The author is a very curious and intense thinker and cannot resist the spiritual smorgasbord that this planet has to offer.
The author was born and raised in India and had in my view the great good fortune to have been guided to Pondicherry while attending Oxford classes as his first real immersion into a spiritual quest. There he joined other meditators from the Aurobindo ashram at Aurobindo's tomb.
After his meditations:
"Two nights before I left Mahabalipuram I was strolling at midnight along the moonlit curve of beach to the hotel, when all at once my mind split apart, like a coconut thrown against a wall, and everything, instead of being deliciously and warmly outside, was now inside. The wind was inside me and the sea pounding and the sand under my feet, and the whole wild softly pulsing creation was singing with one voice OM distinctly and unmistakably, a resounding horizon-to-horizon curling, vibrant, rich OM that was sounding within me. It took whatever scrap of mind I had left to remain standing, to stagger on. There was a complete separation between whatever consciousness I was now in, seeing and reveling in this vastness, and my body tottering on the sands, barely able to hold what it had been given. I had flowered far above and around and beyond my body and was connected to it by only the most fragile of threads, only just strong enough to drag it forward, like a piece of driftwood. I had enough mind left to gaze at the hulls of the boats around me, at the nets lying on the sands, at the sands themselves, at my feet; everything was still in its old shape, but shimmering with a soft milky light. I remember, absurdly, blinking again and again to see if the vision would go away, but the roaring OM went on, and the light kept breaking from my feet and the sands around them."

He also met Jean-Marc Frechette, someone who spent a lot of time laughing at him and whose "gift to me--for which I will always be grateful--was to live the spiritual life before my eyes with such a happy simplicity I could not deny its truth. Jean-Marc had given up all `normal' life for a small room with a badly working fan by the sea in South India. He had almost no money, no job to go to, no ring of friends to sustain his choice--nothing, in fact, but his faith, his few books of Claudel, Rene Char, and Aurobindo, and the sound of the sea. Yet he was the clearest man I had ever known, spare, joyful, delight fully eccentric..." Jean-Marc had a sophistication that made for strong bond of fellowship. Later Jean-Marc would be the one to introduce him to Mother Meera (Ma) at the early age of 17 just as her guardian presented her to the public in 1978 at Auroville. (Now she now lives in Thalheim, Germany) She was born enlightened.. Because of his strong academic background and powerful ego, it took about 12 years for his awakening which is richly detailed in the book. The author became a friend of the family, specifically Mr. Reddy, her guardian and her friend and helper Adilakshmi.
"It was early evening. Darshan had been unusually long--two hours. Jean-Marc, I, and an American were standing outside the door of Meera's apartment putting on our shoes.
The door opened with a sharp clack. Still in the brilliant red sari she had worn for darshan, stood Meera alone. All around her, as she stood there gazing at us with a passion I had never seen before on her face, was a blaze of Light--white diamond Light--all the brighter for being in the darkness of the doorway. I began to tremble and perspire. The Light streamed from her; her skin was a deep fiery gold; her eyes blazed, vast and abstract, like two bonfires in the darkness. The Light was of the same pure, piercing whiteness that I had seen in the vision Aurobindo had given me the year before. I gazed at it around Meera, hardly able to believe what I was seeing. That it emanated from her and not from any other source was unmistakable; beyond any doubt I was seeing with open eyes the Divine Light and Meera burning in it.
We all three saw the Light, simultaneously, together, and were unable to move or say anything.
Slowly, with profound tenderness, Meera turned to each of us and transformed herself before our eyes. She turned to Jean-Marc and became immediately the Goddess of his inner dream--warm, sensuous, smiling, her head tilted slightly. She turned to the American and seemed to melt, visibly, into another shape--to grow taller, older, to become hieratic, and grave with the majesty I had seen in her when she appeared to my inner eye as the Queen of Heaven. Then she turned to me. Her face seemed to detach itself from her body and swim, burning, back and forth in the air before me. There was nothing but her face. I did not know whether it was separate from me or within me; all sense of distance was obliterated. The Light became more and more intense, so bright that it took all my strength to go on looking into it. The face was smiling--not gently as it had to Jean-Marc but with a tigerish, exultant smile, a smile of absolute triumph. She gazed deep into my eyes; my whole body filled with flame. In the seconds of that gaze I was only my eyes and this Fire.
The three of us had, as if in a dream, raised our hands to salute her. Meera became "herself" again and raptly saluted us each in turn. The humility of this gesture pierced me even more deeply than the glory of the smile she had given me. She was saluting, I realized, the divine Self in each of us. "You, too, are this Light that I am," her gesture told us. "You are Me and I am you and we are inseparable forever."
Then she bowed her head and closed the door quietly."
This is powerful stuff and the book is filled with such descriptions, particularly closer to the end. He recounts many personal dialogs he had with Ma and became her personal English tutor when she moved to Germany.
"I know in a poem everything would go beautifully and quickly. But real processes are not quite like that. There is a lot of crisscrossing and staggering and sheer error. You make an advance, then you fall back and hit your head on the floor again. You have a run of exquisite, perfect days, and then you repeat all the old rubbish. It takes time to get the hang of it. It's a little like playing a complicated piece of music. You have to practice bits of it at a time, over and over again, with discipline, then slowly put it together and play it all through several hundred times until it becomes as natural to you as breathing in and out, or taking a leak. Ma's is a revolutionary method and works fast. But don't think it is easy. Even if the Divine Light is beaming at you, sometimes you feel, I just can't take any more of this. I want to go out and get drunk. The ego holds on to its pleasures, its silly doomed pleasures, with a tenacity that would be touching if it were not so deadly."
In the book he clearly credits Ma as his inspiration and spiritual mentor and attributes his progress to his association with her, but she says:
"Humanity must work for that [evolutionary] leap. Humanity must become conscious. Aspiration is everything. Aspiration and work. My help is always given, my help and my light. But humanity must work....Humans want God to do everything. Humans have to do something."
He gives a hot log analogy of the value of a guru. "St. John compares the soul to a log of wood that has to be first penetrated by the fire and then consumed in it. The log is initially always dank and dirty and has first to be prepared by the fire before the Fire can enter it." Then he relates this to his personal experience.
"The Fire is a mirror in which all the cruelties and subtle madness of the ego are seen, with no possibility of evasion or consolation. I lived again through my long betrayal of Her, all the ways I still looked to use or evade her, the grief of my sexual and creative life, the sullen hypocrisies I had cherished in myself.
Throughout this agony I could never forget everything I knew of Her Mercy. I knew a power as loving as hers would never wound except to heal; would never strip me unless to clothe me in richness and splendor; would never make me cry out again and again in grief unless the death this brought was to prepare an infinitely wider life."
Meera makes no claims of exclusivity, in fact, "There are others who are also doing divine work....I am not interested in ashrams. I am not interested in founding a movement for people who do not want to work, who want only to sit around and think about what they think is God. I want people to work. People should go on living their ordinary lives. Family life is a very good place to do my work. It teaches people to be unselfish. I want people to be strong, self-reliant, unselfish, and to contribute to the world with whatever skills and gifts they have. I want them to work--with my light behind them....The important thing is to pray and to receive light. That in itself changes everything."
  • MrRipper
About 5 years ago I was on my way to Oregon spur of the moment, because my intuition was guiding me there. All I ever saw was Oregon plates and met people who talked about it so I figured it was a sign. During that point in my life my mind had been opened by some psychedelics and I was eager for truth after finding out religion was a fable. Anywho, I stopped in this random town, went straight to a thrift store, went straight to the middle bookshelf, and without looking at any books grabbed this one. I bought it and left. While chillin in Eugene I read it and was awakened to a whole new sense of life and myself. That was 5 years ago and I am so thankful to have been brought to this book by the Universe or I would have lost faith in humanity and given up a long time ago.
  • Qutalan
Hidden Journey reminds me of the Joan Osborne song "If God Were One Of Us." It tells the story of Andrew Harvey's nine years of spiritual growth while a pupil of Mother Meera, an woman who claims to be an incarnation of God on Earth. He meets Meera at the Aurobindo ashram in Pondicherry at the end of 1978 when he is 27 and she is 18. She has been brought there by Mr. Reddy, an Indian who had been seeking the Mother Goddess his whole life and discovered Meera when she was an 11 year old servant in his in-laws' home.

The book is more about Harvey's mystical journey, but people interested in Mother Meera will also find the book useful. He describes her silent meetings with followers (darshan) where she first holds the devotee's head in her hands and then looks into their eyes, supposedly imparting her grace in this process. Also her early life in India and Thalheim Germany are presented, but in a very subjective way through the practice of Mr. Harvey.

Since Mother Meera is silent during her public appearances, much of what we learn of her is from question and answer periods that Harvey held with her in private. However, even these are presented basically as leading questions by Harvey to which Meera agrees. The other method that Harvey uses to reveal her thoughts is through Mother Meera's voice in Harvey's head. He presents Meera as being able to communicate with him telepathically and many discussions in the book, presented in italics, are of this nature.

Another large portion of the book is devoted to the mystical gifts of visions and dreams that Harvey gets from Meera during his spiritual progress. Many of them are of glowing radiances, golden glows, and other lights. While these and other unusual occurences present a very lively and dramatic view of the mystical path, I found them repetative and skipped over a lot of them.

The book does present how an average human being with a fair share of personal problems can make spiritual progress through mystical practice. However, although Harvey made lots of progress, one gets the idea that he still has a way to go.