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The Lady in the Palazzo: At Home in Umbria download ebook

by de-blasi-marlena

The Lady in the Palazzo: At Home in Umbria download ebook
ISBN:
1844082733
ISBN13:
978-1844082735
Author:
de-blasi-marlena
Publisher:
Virago Press Ltd (2007)
Language:
Pages:
384 pages
ePUB:
1423 kb
Fb2:
1211 kb
Other formats:
docx doc lrf lrf
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

Umbria, de Blasi contends, differs from other Italian provinces because it touches neither the sea nor another country. To this end The Lady in the Palazzo was a good book to read about Umbria, with lots of fun anecdotes about the towns and culture of the region

Umbria, de Blasi contends, differs from other Italian provinces because it touches neither the sea nor another country. Its central location gives it characteristics of both north and south. Despite Umbria's singular physiography, Orvietans are even more guarded and distant than the neighboring Tuscans. To this end The Lady in the Palazzo was a good book to read about Umbria, with lots of fun anecdotes about the towns and culture of the region. However the writing is run-of-the-mill and at times awkward. For example, in the middle of the book two chapters are devoted to the back stories of the novel's supporting characters.

Do not read any Marlena de Blasi book while hungry. The descriptions of feasts – humble to extravagant – will make your stomach rebel and your mouth salivate. Lady in the Palazzo has all the ingredients that made her other books such delicious reading experiences

Do not read any Marlena de Blasi book while hungry. Lady in the Palazzo has all the ingredients that made her other books such delicious reading experiences. Foremost of course is the food (if you want to be inspired, if you lost the joy in cooking or eating (gasp!) hers are the books you need to read). Just take this simple meal, for instance: "We are served a deep basin full of pale, yellow Do not read any Marlena de Blasi book while hungry

Do not read any Marlena de Blasi book while hungry. Just take this simple meal, for instance: "We are served a deep ba Do not read any Marlena de Blasi book while hungry

Marlena di Blasi seduced readers to fall in love with Venice, then Tuscany, with her popular and critically acclaimed books A. .

Marlena di Blasi seduced readers to fall in love with Venice, then Tuscany, with her popular and critically acclaimed books A Thousand Days in Venice and A Thousand. She and her husband find an ideal place, an apartment in what was once the grand palazzo of the Ubaldini family - a home dating back to medieval times. Unfortunately, the apartment had been sitting vacant for 13 years and was in dire need of restoration. They could not live in their home during the construction.

Аудиокнига "The Lady in the Palazzo: At Home in Umbria", Marlena de Blasi. Читает Laural Merlington. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

With a voice full of wonder, de Blasi brings to life these engagingly quirky people and the aloof, almost daunting society that exists in Umbria

With a voice full of wonder, de Blasi brings to life these engagingly quirky people and the aloof, almost daunting society that exists in Umbria. Not since Peter Mayle's A Year in Provence has a writer so convincingly captures the essence of a singular place and created a feast for readers of all stripes. Vivid writing and an affectionate appreciation of the sounds, scenes and flavors of Italy. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

Book Shelf Tour/Book Collection!

Book Shelf Tour/Book Collection!

Marlena di Blasi seduced readers to fall in love with Venice, then Tuscany, with her popular and critically acclaimed . Now she takes readers on a journey into the heart of Orvieto, an ancient city in the less-trodden region of Umbria.

Marlena di Blasi seduced readers to fall in love with Venice, then Tuscany, with her popular and critically acclaimed books "A Thousand Days in Venice" and "A Thousand Days in Tuscany.

When Marlena moves with her husband to the small town of Orvieto to renovate a dilapidated medieval palazzo, she knows that the fastest way into the hearts and homes of her new neighbours is through their stomachs. In her third memoir about life in Italy, Marlena de Blasi returns with all of the sumptuous prose and delectable descriptions of the place she calls home, the food that she prepares, and best of all, the people she meets.
Reviews:
  • Landamath
There are a number of wonderful things about De Blasi's book and one somewhat irritating aspect. I'll kill off the irritating one first. For some reason, she uses a mechanism that works in speech but, for my taste, fails in writing. She ends a sentence and then finishes the thought in the next sentence without using a connecting word or phrase. An example: "Like the ladies up in Buon Respiro, we forage, too. For wild asparagus...or pirates beard...or the silky transparent cress..." At times, I found myself falling out of the enchantment of the writing as my brain searched for the connector. Shaking my head in irritation. (I'm sorry. Couldn't help it...)

Otherwise, this is a beautiful book. I was expecting another thin offering written by an enthusiastic ex-pat with marginal writing skills and was pleasantly surprised to get pulled into a skillfully crafted narrative. In short, the author and her husband search for a home in Umbria and find it, but the struggle to make it their own is long one. Along the way they bring together a set of people from different classes of Umbrian society and ply them with food, color, and music. Also, along the way, the author did just what a good author should—she made me want to be there.

De Blasi is a first class observer of people and her descriptions of them are rich and earthy. She, herself, comes across as mildly eccentric and happy about it. She is willing to reveal some of her own personal insecurities, but does not dwell on them, which i found to be an endearing trait. As the work progresses, she introduces other mild eccentrics, each with their own beauty, scars, and weaknesses. In the end, she brings the reader to a dinner party in their remodeled home (the ancient ballroom of a noble family near the duomo in Orvieto) and seats them around a table with pineapple legs. Around that table are a collection of persons that she was warned could not be brought together in Umbria...ooops.

All in all, a good read.
  • Ghile
A delightful romp through the nuances of the rich (and to me, not famous) families of Orvieto. Having visited the "rock" several times for long periods, it was a very fun read. The beautiful city and surrounding countryside came to life in Ms de Blasi's tale of moving to and renovating a home in Umbria.
Moving on to her earlier book about Venice.
  • Steelcaster
These books are all very easy reading, particularly if you've been to Italy. You'll recognize the basic elements of the culture she describes, but be enlightened by her education in the regional ways of thinking, living, and cooking. She transports you to each region n which she lives. Magical! Occasionally her metaphors and adjectives get a litte blowy, so you have a hard time understanding her meaning, but that issue is completely outweighed by all pleasure you'll get from her. Prose,mthe evident live she has for the people, the food, the culture of Italy.
  • Gosar
When I travel, I enjoy reading novels about the place I'm going to - it adds an extra dimension to all of the new sights and cities. To this end The Lady in the Palazzo was a good book to read about Umbria, with lots of fun anecdotes about the towns and culture of the region. However the writing is run-of-the-mill and at times awkward. For example, in the middle of the book two chapters are devoted to the back stories of the novel's supporting characters. While flashbacks like this can be an interesting literary device, these chapters seemed like they were just randomly and clumsily pasted into the middle of the novel. What's more, the books finale seemed like it was more for the author's benefit than for the readers (I won't spoil it).
  • Mbon
Everything di Blasi writes is wonderful if you like food and have a genuine desire to know what it's like to become part of the places where she and her blueberry-eyed Venetian husband, Fernando, travel. They worm their way into the bosom of each community in which they live (one per book), making friends, making a new home, and cooking whatever is fresh and ready to become a mouth-watering lunch or dinner. I highly recommend each of her books, of which this is the fourth. They can be read out of order but I think the reader will get more out of them if they're read in chronological order.
  • Cordabor
I agree with everyone who says this book is de Blasi's best yet. She seems to have settled into marriage with Fernando. In Venice and Tuscany everything seemed tinged with a lustful haze, but now they are working things out together, caring for each other - much more seemly behavior for a middle-aged couple!

I was totally captivated by Marlena's struggle to fit in with her new neighbors. Fernando seems to provide minimal assistance. Also thrilled that Barlozzo appears in this book - he is such an endearing character!

This book brought me to tears several times. Few books compel me to keep reading without a break until they are over. This was definitely one of those books. Days later I can close my eyes and picture scenes from the book, her writing is so vivid. My guess is that Marlena and Fernando will make another move before too long - they are both restless characters. Even if they stay put for a while, surely the story will be just as riveting. I eagerly look forward to the next chapter in their journey
  • Kifer
This book is a beautifully and masterfully written memoir about living in Umbria. Any Italophile will relish this book and delight in its sensory indulgences.
Wonderful, very personal story. Marlena de Blasi.writes beautifully. This book will make you want to travel to Orvieto.