cerkalo
» » In the Face of the Enemy: A Battery Sergeant Major in Action in the Second World War

In the Face of the Enemy: A Battery Sergeant Major in Action in the Second World War download ebook

by E.A. Powdrill

In the Face of the Enemy: A Battery Sergeant Major in Action in the Second World War download ebook
ISBN:
1844158500
ISBN13:
978-1844158508
Author:
E.A. Powdrill
Publisher:
Pen and Sword (April 21, 2009)
Language:
Pages:
160 pages
ePUB:
1126 kb
Fb2:
1679 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr rtf lrf
Category:
Leaders & Notable People
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

Start by marking In the Face of the Enemy: A Battery . In Part One Powdrill describes his experiences in France during the Phoney War and then their baptism by fire in May 1940, culminating in the evacuation from Dunkirk having left their disabled guns behind

Start by marking In the Face of the Enemy: A Battery Sergeant Major in Action in the Second World War as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In Part One Powdrill describes his experiences in France during the Phoney War and then their baptism by fire in May 1940, culminating in the evacuation from Dunkirk having left their disabled guns behind. Ernest was wounded but many of his colleagues were killed by ferocious German counter-battery fire. Part 2 tells a very different story in more detail.

Read "In the Face of the Enemy A Battery Sergeant Major in Action in the .

In Part One Powdrill describes his experiences in France during 'the Phoney War' and then their baptism by fire in May 1940 .

In Part One Powdrill describes his experiences in France during 'the Phoney War' and then their baptism by fire in May 1940, culminating in the evacuation from Dunkirk having left their disabled guns behind.

Battery Sergeant Major Ernest Powdrill describes the situation as the the . He was the senior NCO of a battery of Sexton self propelled guns.

Battery Sergeant Major Ernest Powdrill describes the situation as the the British forces pushed forward into the German lines. Twice on the 3rd August he abandoned the relative security of the the gun positions and went forward on foot to investigate the position in front. It was for these actions that he was awarded the Military Cross We stayed the night there in some trepidation, deep in enemy territory, literally surrounded by roaming German tanks and infantry.

Third in the all-action War series written by Len Levinson writing as Gordon Davis. The Road to Waterloo: a concise history of the 1815 campaign. In the Face of the Enemy: A Battery Sergeant Major in Action in the Second World War. . Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Decision on Corregidor: A Story of Courage, Determination and Sorrow.

Torrent details for "In the Face of the Enemy- A Battery . In Part One Powdrill describes his experiences in France during ‘the Phoney War’ and then their baptism by fire in May 1940, culminating in the evacuation from Dunkirk having left their disabled guns behind.

Torrent details for "In the Face of the Enemy- A Battery Sergeant Major in Action in the Second World War - [ FreeCo. By now a Sergeant Major in an armoured tracked regiment, the author fought through from the Normandy beaches to the River Maas.

In the Face of the Enemy: A Battery Sergeant Major in Action in the Second World Wa. Jack Swaab enlisted in the Royal Artillery on 10 September 1939.

In the Face of the Enemy: A Battery Sergeant Major in Action in the Second World War. E A Powdrill. He kept a war diary from December 1942 until August 1945, seeing action in Tunisia and Sicily before becoming a forward observation officer in the North West Europe campaign. He was Mentioned in Despatches and awarded the Military Cross.

Choose file format of this book to download . Powdrill, E. A. Personal Name: Powdrill, E. Corporate Name: Great Britain, Army, Gunners, Biography.

In Part One Powdrill describes his experiences in France during ‘the Phoney War’ and then their baptism by fire in May 1940, culminating in the evacuation from Dunkirk having left their disabled guns behind. He describes the near constant action in graphic terms

During the Civil War, regimental flags served as the rallying point for the unit, and guided the unit's movements. Gallantry in various actions during the rebellion.

During the Civil War, regimental flags served as the rallying point for the unit, and guided the unit's movements. Loss of the flag could greatly disrupt a unit, and could have a greater effect than the death of the commanding officer. Main article: Medal of Honor.

In Part One Powdrill describes his experiences in France during ‘the Phoney War’ and then their baptism by fire in May 1940, culminating in the evacuation from Dunkirk having left their disabled guns behind. Ernest was wounded but many of his colleagues were killed by ferocious German counter-battery fire. Part 2 tells a very different story in more detail. By now a Sergeant Major in an armoured tracked regiment, the author fought through from the Normandy beaches to the River Maas. He describes the near constant action in graphic terms. In the Face of the Enemy is a splendid soldier’s story full of understatement and atmosphere. Success is tinged with sadness for lost comrades and admiration for his fellow men.
Reviews:
  • Maldarbaq
BSM Powdrill saw action during the abortive BEF foray into Europe in 1939-40, but as he himself explains the situation was so confusing it was hard to give a sequence of events with any clarity. Nevertheless, he does describe a number of incidents which shed light on the campaign. Powdrill really hits his stride when writing from a soldier's eye view of the war in NW Europe during the 1944-45 campaign. This makes up the majority of the book, and as an account from the man on the spot is hard to beat.
  • Frdi
Awesome
  • Rolorel
Powdrill was a pre-war soldier. When the war started he was a gun sergeant with C Troop, 30/46 Battery of the 10th Field Rgt. The used 18/25 pounders, which were re-bored WW1 guns. In France they were part of 2nd Infantry Division. When the fighting started they fire plenty of support missions, that progressively start to reveal the collapse of the front. Remarkably, despite the chaos and some close calls with German mechanised forces, they maintain unit cohesion to the end. Interestingly, despite the collapse of supply lines he declines any opportunity to obtain food, as looting was severely punished! Just before the end he is wounded but fortunate in his treatment and evacuation. There were some interesting stories through here but the surprise to me was that when conducting a fire mission, there was no seeking cover from counter-battery fire! They kept at it and simply endured casualties.

Powdrill returns to France in June 1944 as a member of H Battery, 13th HAC Regt RHA , part of 11th Armd Div. This time he is WO2 BSM of ‘D’ Trp, commanding four Sexton self propelled 25 pounders. There are a host of fire missions, to the extent that they rarely get any rest. What time is found is utilised to maintain and supply their vehicles and weapons. Powdrill has a Bren carrier which he whips around in, doing whatever it took to obtain the huge amount of ammunition needed. They are strongly involved in Epsom and Goodwood. Here they were supporting 3RTR and are obliged to themselves traverse the infamous railway line that cut the battle field in half. The conditions are chaotic with masses of incoming shelling and shattered ground littered with destroyed tanks and dead. He writes that 11th Armd lost 191 tanks the first day. They themselves are caught in the midst of tank battles and at times are confronting German forces directly. Much of the time Powdrill is performing 4 jobs and the exhaustion is acute.

The remainder of Powdrill’s experiences relate to the ‘swan’ through France and the actions in Holland and into Germany. They suffer casualties but in many ways they are lucky. Shells just miss, a German patrol turns the other way or an ambush is imperfectly sprung. While comparatively safer than the infantry, it is still a hard war. Powdrill’s account is a good one and given he was in a mechanised regiment, he has a very interesting perspective. There is a degree of repetition due to the nature of the role. Though his fighting is often remote from the target, he still has stories of war horrors. This is not a sanitised account and the author seems to have been open with the details of his service. Recommended 3 ½ stars