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Brute: The Life of Victor Krulak, U.S. Marine download ebook

by Robert Coram

Brute: The Life of Victor Krulak, U.S. Marine download ebook
ISBN:
0316758469
ISBN13:
978-0316758468
Author:
Robert Coram
Publisher:
Little, Brown and Company; 1st edition (November 10, 2010)
Language:
Pages:
374 pages
ePUB:
1645 kb
Fb2:
1939 kb
Other formats:
doc rtf azw docx
Category:
Leaders & Notable People
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.7

Victor Brute Krulak is arguably the most important officer in the history of the .

Victor Brute Krulak is arguably the most important officer in the history of the . Coram's masterful portrayal of Krulak's complex personality accurately depicts a leader who drove both himself and his Marines to excel, no matter what the cost. ―Colonel Jon T. Hoffman, USMCR(Ret), author of Chesty: The Story of Lieutenant General Lewis B. Puller, USM. "A great book, a compelling and insightful look at one of America's greatest heroes.

Victor Krulak's story and accomplishments teach us a good deal: About learning from the experiences and setbacks of the past . Coram, Robert (2010). Brute: The Life of Victor Krulak, .

Victor Krulak's story and accomplishments teach us a good deal: About learning from the experiences and setbacks of the past; About being open to take ideas and inspiration from wherever they come; and. About overcoming conventional wisdom and bureaucratic obstacles thrown in one's path The Brute Krulak Center for Innovation and Creativity (BKCIC) at the Marine Corps University is named after Victor Krulak. Little, Brown & Co. ISBN 978-0-316-75846-8. Hove, Duane T. (2003).

Coram, Robert (2010). Krulak, General Charles C. (USMC Commandant of the Marine Corps) (1998-05-16). "Legacy of Valor: FMF Corpsmen and Medical Personnel", Commencement Remarks for the Uniformed Services University at the DAR Constitution Hall". Archived from the original on 2008-01-06.

BRUTE: A biography of Lt Gen Victor Brute Krulak by Robert Coram. Victor Krulak was an unlikely candidate for the Naval Academy. His family were of Russian Jewish stock ( a fact he hid all of his life) and he only stood 5’4 tall and weighed in at 116 lbs. Technically too short and too light weight for the academy. A great book, objective, critical, and true to the historical information of the life of General Krulak who's son would later in the 1990s become the Commandant of the Marine Corps. May 20, 2017 Gregg Brewer rated it liked it.

The military historian Robert Coram captures General Krulak’s striding march across the Marine Corps, and across the American century, in Brute: The Life of Victor Krulak, . It’s a work of popular military history that’s at times ragged and hectoring, but always plainspoken and absorbing. He was posted to Shanghai as an intelligence officer during the Japanese incursions of the 1930s, and during World War II he led a battalion on a daring raid in the Solomon Islands, though his soldiers were vastly outnumbered. Some of the men were rescued in a PT boat skippered by John F. Kennedy. He was a mastermind of the Okinawa invasion.

If Victor "Brute" Krulak hadn't lied about his Jewish roots and obsessively covered up his background in. .at the core of journalist and historian Robert Coram's new biography, Brute: The Life of Victor Krulak, .

From the earliest days of his thirty-four-year military career, Victor "Brute" Krulak displayed a remarkable facility for applying creative ways of fighting to the Marine Corps. He went on daring spy missions, was badly wounded, pioneered the use of amphibious vehicles, and masterminded the invasion of Okinawa. In Korea, he was a combat hero and invented the use of helicopters in warfare.

Автор: Coram Robert Название: Brute: The Life of Victor Krulak, . Robert Coram finally brings to light the remarkable story of a man who polarized all who knew him, but who left a legacy that will influence the military - and all of America - for decades to come.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Brute: The Life of Victor Krulak, .

From the earliest days of his thirty-four-year military career, Victor "Brute" Krulak displayed a remarkable facility for applying creative ways of fighting to the Marine Corps. He went on daring spy missions, was badly wounded, pioneered the use of amphibious vehicles, and masterminded the invasion of Okinawa. In Korea, he was a combat hero and invented the use of helicopters in warfare. In Vietnam, he developed a holistic strategy in stark contrast to the Army's "Search and Destroy" methods-but when he stood up to LBJ to protest, he was punished. And yet it can be argued that all of his these accomplishments pale in comparison to what he did after World War II and again after Korea: Krulak almost single-handedly stopped the U.S. government from abolishing the Marine Corps.
Reviews:
  • Dynen
Robert Coram is a national treasure and the recent release of BRUTE confirms his position as one of America's premier military biographers. Mr. Coram took the straight and true method of portraying a genuine great man, but not in absence of his humanity. As Norman Maclean observes in his classic A River Runs Through It, man is a "damned mess;" even the great and the hero has flaws, and General Krulak was no exception. Coram correctly observes in the Acknowledgements:

"Some aspects of Brute Krulak's early years are disturbing. I elected to take an explanatory stance toward those years. Some will say I should have replaced the frail reed of sympathy with the righteous sword of judgement. But my sins as a young man were scarlet, and they were many. I do not consider those green actions the defining moments of my life and if I am to be measured, let it be by the deeds of my later years. Here I afforded Brute Krulak what I would ask for myself."

Wow! It would be nice if more biographer's used such a perspective; as a great man once said to me, "It is not how you start, it is how you finish."

General Krulak did his Corps proud and sometimes it was not pretty, but he held a passionate love for his country and his Corps. Mr. Coram presents a man of single minded purpose, who kept his Corps relevant because he knew that is what America wanted and continues to need. Mr. Coram traces the life story of a man driven to achieve and contribute. From General Krulak's contributions to the development in the years leading up to WWII of amphibious warfare as a core competency to his largely rejected ideas of counterinsurgency warfare in Vietnam, Mr. Coram paints the portrait of a man of substance, intellect, and passion. Our country needs more senior officers who have the courage of their convictions and tell the truth to their civilian leaders---especially when what needs to be said isn't pleasant.

I read BRUTE in two sittings and enjoyed it thoroughly.

If you enjoyed Mr. Coram's biographies of John Boyd and Bud Day, get this book and read it! Highest recommendation!!
  • Painwind
I preface by saying this is a very biased review having served under General Krulak in the 60's. I kindly refer you to my review of Krulak's earlier book, "First to Fight." Updating my comments, I cannot state just how important General Krulak was in keeping the Marine Corps intact. Had not for him, the Army would have abolished the Corps; the Air Force would have consumed our air wings, and the Navy would have gladly dropped us on Iwo Jima again.

The organization I am presently affiliated with, the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Correspondents Association, knows all too well how mercurial and tenuous the Corps' future can be. Our WWII predecessors, comprised of distinguished newsmen and cameramen -- including Norm Hatch who is still active, altered public opinion and Congress to support the Marine Corps. And Krulak's presence was notably felt.

Frank Lee
Vice President, L.A. Chapter
National Board Member
USMC Combat Correspondents Assn
  • Phalaken
Brute was on an add for my Kindle. We'd never heard of Victor (Brute) Krulak and my husband thought I must be mistaken about it being
a biography until we Googled for more information. Also, the first chapter or so made me think I did not like the man. However, the
more I read, the more I admired his work in and for the USMC, the men under his command, and for our country in general. Brute had
a good mind, was interested in "what works" from his work on landing craft to the use of choppers to aid in reconnaissance.

As he rose through the ranks, Brute learned how to position himself with the people in power in orde to present his good ideas and
earnest philosophies. It might be said that the USMC could have been disbanded had it not been for his efforts.

Robert Coram has written a fine history of the Unithed States Marines while telling us about Colonel Krulak. Since my serendipitous
discovery, a number of our friends with a military background have enjoyed this book. We had to get a couple of hard copies to share!
  • Beahelm
A most important book that provides historical information for all U.S. Marines and any person interested in the Military History. "Brute" was a force to be reckoned with - successfully managing (though unintentionally) to peeve of LBJ for his handling of the Vietnam War in the micromanagement style - his suggestions of handling the Vietnam War were later adopted by General David Patreaus in handling both the Surge in Iraq and later Afghanistan. The additional importance here for me is the proof of how the popular books of the days during the Vietnam War are successfully countered by a more true and accurate account of lesser known authors because of the stance they took against the so called "counter culture" of the day.

A great book, objective, critical, and true to the historical information of the life of General Krulak who's son would later in the 1990s become the Commandant of the Marine Corps.