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Patrick Henry: First Among Patriots download ebook

by Thomas S. Kidd

Patrick Henry: First Among Patriots download ebook
ISBN:
046500928X
ISBN13:
978-0465009282
Author:
Thomas S. Kidd
Publisher:
Basic Books; 1 edition (November 22, 2011)
Language:
Pages:
320 pages
ePUB:
1633 kb
Fb2:
1176 kb
Other formats:
lrf lrf lit lrf
Category:
Leaders & Notable People
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

Thomas Kidd is especially compelling on why Henry's life-long devotion to liberty could never move him to free his own slaves and why that same devotion led him to OPPPOSE the United States Constitution of 1787.

Thomas Kidd is especially compelling on why Henry's life-long devotion to liberty could never move him to free his own slaves and why that same devotion led him to OPPPOSE the United States Constitution of 1787. Kirkus Kidd's biography awakens us to the depths of Henry's devotion to liberty and small government

Table of Contents Also by Thomas S. Kidd Title Page Dedication . And here he was again-a man first among patriots, denounced as a turncoat.

Table of Contents Also by Thomas S. Kidd Title Page Dedication Introduction Chapter 1 - IF YOUR INDUSTRY BE ONLY HALF EQUAL TO YOUR GENIUS Chapter 2 - THE INFATUATION O. The Nefarious and Highly Criminal Patrick Henry Patrick Henry in American Memory. The vote over ratification was an epochal moment in the history of human liberty, Henry declared.

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As historian Thomas S. Kidd shows, Henry cherished a vision of America as a. .In Patrick Henry, Kidd pulls back the curtain on one of our most radical, passionate Founders, showing that until we understand Henry himself, we will neglect many of the Revolution's animating values. Kidd shows, Henry cherished a vision of America as a virtuous republic with a clearly circumscribed central government. These ideals brought him into bitter conflict with other Founders and were crystallized in his vociferous opposition to the . PATRICK HENRY: First Among Patriots. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus.

Kidd sets out to examine whether Henry can indeed be considered one of.

Kidd sets out to examine whether Henry can indeed be considered one of the leading Founding Fathers, regardless of the role that he played igniting the war for American independence, since he exerted strenuous efforts to defeat Virginia’s ratification of the Constitution in 1788.

Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was an American attorney, planter, and orator best known for his declaration to the Second Virginia Convention (1775): "Give me liberty, or give me death!"

Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was an American attorney, planter, and orator best known for his declaration to the Second Virginia Convention (1775): "Give me liberty, or give me death!" A Founding Father, he served as the first and sixth post-colonial Governor of Virginia, from 1776 to 1779 and from 1784 to 1786. Henry was born in Hanover County, Virginia, and was for the most part educated at home.

Most Americans know Patrick Henry as a fiery speaker whose pronouncement Give me liberty or give me death!" rallied American defiance to the British Crown. But Henry's skills as an orator,sharpened in the small towns and courtrooms of colonial Virginia,are only one part of his vast, but largely forgotten, legacy. As historian Thomas S.

Patrick Henry: First Among Patriots (Basic Books, 2011). The Healing of Mercy Wheeler: Illness and Miracles among Early American Evangelicals,' William and Mary Quarterly, 3d se. 63, no. 1 (Jan. 2006), 149-70. God of Liberty: A Religious History of the American Revolution (Basic Books, 2010). American Christians and Islam: Evangelical Culture and Muslims from the Colonial Period to the Age of Terrorism (Princeton University Press, 2008). The Great Awakening: The Roots of Evangelical Christianity in Colonial America (Yale University Press, 2007). The Great Awakening: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford Books, 2007).

First Among Patriots. A deeper look at Patrick Henry. Henry was a true radical, and his give me liberty or give me death speech perfectly illustrated his politics and his struggle for liberty and religious freedom. Moved by the Great Awakening, he agreed with the evangelical preachers who railed against the tax-supported Anglican Church. While he never moved away from the established church, he took up the cause of religious freedom and fought to include it in the Bill of Rights.

Most Americans know Patrick Henry as a fiery speaker whose pronouncement “Give me liberty or give me death!” rallied American defiance to the British Crown. But Henry's skills as an orator—sharpened in the small towns and courtrooms of colonial Virginia—are only one part of his vast, but largely forgotten, legacy. As historian Thomas S. Kidd shows, Henry cherished a vision of America as a virtuous republic with a clearly circumscribed central government. These ideals brought him into bitter conflict with other Founders and were crystallized in his vociferous opposition to the U.S. Constitution.

In Patrick Henry, Kidd pulls back the curtain on one of our most radical, passionate Founders, showing that until we understand Henry himself, we will neglect many of the Revolution's animating values.

Reviews:
  • Whitebeard
I really enjoyed this book. For the most part, I found it to be very balanced and well done. There are some places where I felt like Prof. Kidd fell into some modern, politically-correct type analysis that I don't find all that helpful. For example, Prof. Kidd seems to occaisionally accept the prevailing "wisdom" that the American War for Independence was only about money and taxes. Much could be said on this, but it will suffice here to note that this requires us to ignore the words of the Declaration of Independence itself, which talks about a lot more than money. Were all of the Founders just liars who were only concerned about finances but clothed this little financial dispute with the motherland in grandiose language about liberty, freedom, and tyranny? I find such a proposition untenable, but I realize that makes me a distinct minority and probably disqalifies me from being an intellectual due to my audacity to take these people at their word. (Further, lest there be any misunderstanding, I think that economic freedom is enormously important. Right up there with religious and political freedom, as they all go hand-in-hand. Sort of like "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness," which undoubtedly included the pursuit of property.)

However, overall, and with that said, I found the book well-written, historically accurate, fair, and engaging. As an example, he doesn't hid Henry's great talents as an orator, his devotion to the Christian faith, or his penchant for land speculation. He shows Henry as a man dedicated to freedom, and he fairly presents his opposition to the Constitution. He notes that many of Henry's fears regarding the Constitution have come to pass, and, in a particularly well done chapter at the end of the book, he endeavors to tell us what he thinks Henry would think about our current situation. Here is a sample: "[I]t is no great leap to imagine that Patrick Henry would fundamentally object to nearly every feature of today's titanic national government. This statement is not to place Henry on either side of today's political spectrum: he would disapprove equally of the massive, top-down social programs championed by the Left, the globetrotting military power championed by the Right, and the bailouts of financial companies championed by a majority of politicians in 2008. Unlike many of his Christian conservative admirers today, he would not approve of America's recent ventures associated with the War on Terrorism . . . . Henry would probably find that today's America has almost nothing in common with the republic of liberty he envisioned in 1776. On the other hand, the national government has seemingly burst all bounds of power on the domestic and international stages, and on the other, the notion of a virtuous republic has been almost entirely abandoned in favor of what people of Henry's age would have called "license." To him, consolidated political power and ethical license historically triggered the loss of true liberty and the rise of moral and political tyranny." (p. 252-253.) That paragraph certainly shows the fairness of the treatment of Henry and the modern situation!

I heartily recommend this book.
  • Meztisho
This biography of Patrick Henry has a couple outstanding features. First, Thomas Kidd is a master of writing the English language. This may sound trite until you read biographies by writers who are not this fluent. The transitions in the book are excellent; the story of Henry’s life reads very smoothly. Context is woven seamlessly into the flow of the narrative and the context given in the book is always relevant. There is no filler. Chapters and divisions within chapters are divided in a way that allows the reader to follow the author’s points easily. Simply in terms of style, the book is excellent.

But Kidd also raises several points about Henry’s life that are largely unknown to most Americans today but that were critical to Henry’s thought. Somewhat like Sam Adams, Patrick Henry was deeply influenced by the Great Awakening, the religious fervor that spread across the colonies in the late 1600’s and the first part of the 1700’s. Kidd makes a strong point that Henry’s childhood and adolescent exposure to the preaching of the Awakening formed his view of the absolute importance of individual freedom to find one’s way in life. But, even more importantly for understanding the man, it was the style of the preaching – the combination of high emotion and eloquence – that gave Henry his legendary speaking skills. When he gave his speeches, it was Patrick Henry transferring the style of the preachers he heard to the Revolutionary environment. And he was very good at it. Other Founders like Madison were frequently both awed and afraid of him. To Madison emotion did not constitute sound policy but he knew the power of Henry’s oratory to sway legislatures and crowds. Kidd details both the early friendship and later animosity between Henry and Madison and especially between Henry and Jefferson. In his later life Henry’s zeal for liberty caused him to be one of the strongest opponents of the Constitution because he thought it made the central government too powerful and endangered liberty. And Kidd does a nice job of showing how the man who espoused Christian virtue so eloquently often failed in his own personal life to live up to that.

This is a first-rate biography of one of the Founders that we know relatively little about. I highly recommend it.