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Mad as Hell:: The Life and Work of Paddy Chayefsky download ebook

by Shaun Considine

Mad as Hell:: The Life and Work of Paddy Chayefsky download ebook
ISBN:
0679408924
ISBN13:
978-0679408925
Author:
Shaun Considine
Publisher:
Random House; 1st edition (July 26, 1994)
Language:
Pages:
426 pages
ePUB:
1799 kb
Fb2:
1716 kb
Other formats:
azw lrf lrf lit
Category:
Arts & Literature
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.9

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That Paddy Chayefsky was the greatest writer ever to emerge from television's. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Shaun Considine has done us all a favor by writing an outstanding biography of Paddy Chayefsky, the brilliant . In many ways Chayefsky lived a sad and angry life - he was chronically depressed, his wife Susan was reclusive to the point of agoraphobia,and his son Dan emotionally troubled.

Shaun Considine has done us all a favor by writing an outstanding biography of Paddy Chayefsky, the brilliant television, play and screen writer whose legacy includes "Marty", "The Hospital" and "Network". In addition to his writing, Chayevsky is also remembered for his withering response to Vanessa Redgrave's anti-Semitic tirade at the Academy Awards ("A simple thank you would have sufficed. Yet Chayevsky life's was also exciting, productive and successful.

If Considine's book seems to cover five parts career to one part life, it quickly becomes evident that this was how Chayefsky lived. A psychological portrait emerges of a deeply divided man with an unhappy wife and a troubled son. Only after a horrible experience with what would be his last film, Altered States, did Chayefsky finally began to integrate his personality and find some peace, only to die as he turned to new work. An exceptional book that, it is hoped, will prompt a reappraisal of the entire range of Paddy Chayefsky's writing.

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Shaun Considine New York. The writer is the author of "Mad as Hell: The Life and Work of Paddy Chayefsky. Continue reading the main story. Go to Home Page . news.

In his biography Mad as Hell, author Shaun Considine says that Chayefsky had a "dual personality". Chayefsky's "Paddy" persona had "character, caprice; it appealed to his sense of swagger" and gave him confidence to stand up for his rights

In his biography Mad as Hell, author Shaun Considine says that Chayefsky had a "dual personality". Chayefsky's "Paddy" persona had "character, caprice; it appealed to his sense of swagger" and gave him confidence to stand up for his rights Chayefsky was under psychoanalysis for years, beginning in the late 1950s, to deal with his volatile behavior and rage, which at times was difficult to control.

a b c Considine, Shaun. American Screenwriters: Second Series. All His Jazz: The Life and Death of Bob Fosse, Da Capo Press (1990) pp. 170–171. Paddy Chayefsky papers, 1907–1998 (bulk 1952–1981), held by the Billy Rose Theatre Division, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. The Angry Man WNYC: On The Media audio profile of Paddy Chayefsky, October 27, 2006.

Applause Books has done an enormous service in compiling this set of Chayefsky's work, most of which has been long out of print. Through Peter Finch, Chayefsky has bequeathed us the immortal line, "I'm mad as hell, and I'm not going to take it any more. Two volumes are devoted to his screenplays, including the film classics Marty (1955), The Goddess (1958), Network (1976), and The Hospital (1971). Fans of the film will notice this script contains some extra dialogue and one brief scene, all of which was probably shot, but which the great director Sidney Lumet saw fit to cut. It won the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay in 1976.

The footstone of Paddy Chayefsky. Paddy and Susan Sackler Chayefsky's son Dan was born six years after their 1949 marriage. Mad as Hell: The Life and Work of Paddy Chayefsky, Random House, 1995. Despite an alleged affair with Kim Novak, Paddy and Susan Chayefsky remained married until his death. Chayefsky died in New York City of cancer in August 1981 at the age of 58, and was interred in the Sharon Gardens Division of Kensico Cemetery in Valhalla, Westchester County, New York.

An anecdotal biography of Paddy Chayefsky follows the life, film career, and personal relationships of the legendary screenwriter, from his humble beginnings in the Bronx through his three Academy Awards for Marty, Network, and Hospital.
Reviews:
  • Ddilonyne
Shaun Considine has done us all a favor by writing an outstanding biography of Paddy Chayefsky, the brilliant television, play and screen writer whose legacy includes "Marty", "The Hospital" and "Network". In addition to his writing, Chayevsky is also remembered for his withering response to Vanessa Redgrave's anti-Semitic tirade at the Academy Awards ("A simple thank you would have sufficed.") Fascinating from start to finish, the book contains a plethora of lively anecodates, and is populated by a large cast of notable characters from the 50's, '60's & '70's -- Burt Lancaster, Bob Fosse, Kim Novak, Arthur Miller, Marilyn Monroe, George C. Scott, Sidney Lumet, George C. Scott, and Nancy Marchant, to name a few.

In many ways Chayefsky lived a sad and angry life -- he was chronically depressed, his wife Susan was reclusive to the point of agoraphobia,and his son Dan emotionally troubled. Yet Chayevsky life's was also exciting, productive and successful. Surrounded by devoted and talented friends, he lived large -- full of spit and vinegar, wit, egotism and brilliance.

Chayevksy knew his own worth as a writer; he didn't lack for confidence and he wasn't humble. Despite frustration after frustration, disappointment and betrayal, Chayevksy kept coming back with new ideas and projects. His failures are as interesting as his successes. After finishing the book, I want to go back and read the scripts that never made it to the screen.

Chaveysky was passionate about his writing and demanded artistic control over his work. In a world where writers were seen as paid lackeys, Chayevsky stood up for the rights of the screenwriter as no one else has. He was just good enough to get the concessions he demanded and in so doing, he paved the way for the writers who followed him. And as screenwriters go, I don't think anyone has ever surpassed him. Chayevsky remains the best example of "The Schreiber Theory", a belief that truly great films are created not by the directors or actors, who play supportive roles, but by the auteur.

In this book, Chayevsky comes across as a man of strong, immoveable convictions and towering humanity. His moral compass made him immune to the political flights of fantasy of his generation. An avowed critic of communism and political extremism of any ilk, he remained a defender of human rights and proud supporter of Israel.

You can't read "Mad As Hell" without concluding that Chayevsky was deeply flawed. He was self absorbed, controlling and prone to temper tantrums. And yet, having read this absorbing biography, I respect and love the man even more. He was both insightful and brutally honest with himself. As he said in his deathbed note to his wife Susan: "I tried...I really tried." (Note: They is a special circle in hell for director Ken Russell for his despicable treatment of Chayevksy during the filming of "Altered States", which may well have contributed to Chayevksy's premature death.)

Considine does a wonderful job of letting Chayevsky's family members, friends and colleagues tell the story of his remarkable life.
  • lifestyle
A thorough work on Paddy's life. A chance to get into his head without being a psychiatrist. This is also a good book about movies and stars and how the business works, even beyond just his life.
  • Neol
"...(Chayesfky) called a trusted friend at NBC, John Chancellor. He asked Chancellor if it was possible for an anchorman to go nuts on TV. 'Every day,' replied Chancellor."
Paddy Chayefsky wrote NETWORK. That would've been enough to put him in the top grade of all Hollywood screenwriters by itself. Twenty-five years after NETWORK hit the screens, there were dozens of articles that his script wasn't just a satire of the media, it was a genuine prophecy.
But Chayefsky has also done what no other writer has yet to do: he's won three Oscars for screenwriting (the other films were MARTY and THE HOSPITAL).
The man is definitely work reading about. Even if I didn't have an interest in screenwriting, I believe I would still find this book interesting for its look into the "Golden Age of Television" and the behind-the-scenes stories of Chayefsky's film career. The author has done a wonderful job of coming up with a lot of great details and fascinating anecdotes about everyone from Marilyn Monroe to Sam Peckinpah to Bob Fosse to Burt Lancaster.
Paddy Chayefsky was the real deal as a writer and I know his work will be praised and studied for decades to come. Shaun Considine has done everyone a favor by giving us a look into Chayefsky's life.
  • Blacknight
I was thinking about Paddy's body of work. Biographies are my favorite genre. So, I decided to purchase this tome.
Mr. Considine approaches Mr. Chayefsky as if he was his psychoanalyst, which can get a little plodding. Although, if you consider the title, in spite of it quoting one of Paddy's seminal works, this is appropriate.
I'm always amused when the biographer gets in the way of the biography. Full disclosure, Mr. Considine presents his case and methodology in his forward to this bio.
Consequently, I'm not really riveted and at this point about a month after downloading this I still haven't finished it or even gotten to the part about the title's story.
Also, there are many misspellings in this kindle version. Fortunately my spelling sucks so much it's not a restriction or incumberance of my comprehension of the material. I spell poorly but know a misspelled word when I see it.
Thank IPad for auto correct!