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A Man Without a Country download ebook

by Kurt Vonnegut

A Man Without a Country download ebook
ISBN:
081297736X
ISBN13:
978-0812977363
Author:
Kurt Vonnegut
Publisher:
Random House Trade Paperbacks (January 16, 2007)
Language:
Pages:
160 pages
ePUB:
1614 kb
Fb2:
1279 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf docx rtf
Category:
Arts & Literature
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

2. Authors, American-20th century-Biography. 3. United States-Politics and government-2001

2. I think I must have done it accidentally at first, just accidentally made a pun that stopped the conversation, something of that sort. And then I found out that a joke was a way to break into an adult conversation. I grew up at a time when comedy in this country was superb-it was the Great Depression. There were large numbers of absolutely top comedians on radio. And without intending to, I really studied them.

A Man Without a Country (subtitle: A Memoir Of Life In George W Bush's America) is an essay collection published in 2005 by the author Kurt Vonnegut. The essays that make up this book deal with topics ranging from the importance of humor, to problems with modern technology, to Vonnegut's opinions on the differences between men and women.

A Man Without a Country book.

It retains Vonnegut's mix of compassion, rage, despair, and humor about the state of humanity. Some of it is dated (his belief that we will soon run out of oil in 2006), but some of it is prescient (that we are destroying the planet)

A Man Without A Country is Kurt Vonnegut's hilariously funny and razor-sharp look at life, art, politics, himself and the condition of the soul of America today

A Man Without A Country is Kurt Vonnegut's hilariously funny and razor-sharp look at life, art, politics, himself and the condition of the soul of America today. It is illustrated throughout with Vonnegut's trademark artwork

As a kid I was the youngest - Do you know what a twerp is? -. - Here is a lesson in creative writing - I'm going to tell you some news - Okay, now let's have some fun - I have been called a Luddite - I turned eighty-two on November 1. .

As a kid I was the youngest - Do you know what a twerp is? -. - Here is a lesson in creative writing - I'm going to tell you some news - Okay, now let's have some fun - I have been called a Luddite - I turned eighty-two on November 11 - Do you know what a humanist is? -. - Do unto others - A sappy woman from Ypsilanti - Now then, I have some good news - I used to be the owner and manager of an automobile dealership - Requiem. In a collection of brief autobiographical essays, the renowned novelist offers his views on art, politics, and everyday life in America.

No, I am not running for President, although I do know that a sentence, if it is to be complete, must have both a subject and a verb. Nor will I confess that I sleep with children. Nor will I confess that I sleep with children hough: My wife is by far the oldest person I ever slept with.

Whimsically illustrated by the author,A Man Without a Countryis intimate, tender, and brimming with the scope of Kurt Vonnegut’s . Thank God, Kurt Vonnegut has broken his promise that he will never write another book

Whimsically illustrated by the author,A Man Without a Countryis intimate, tender, and brimming with the scope of Kurt Vonnegut’s passions. For all those who have lived with Vonnegut in their imaginations. this is what he is like in person. Filled with usual contradictory mix of joy and sorrow, hope and despair, humor and gravity. Thank God, Kurt Vonnegut has broken his promise that he will never write another book. In this wondrous assemblage of mini-memoirs, we discover his family’s legacy and his obstinate, unfashionable humanism.

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “For all those who have lived with Vonnegut in their imaginations . . . this is what he is like in person.”USA Today In a volume that is penetrating, introspective, incisive, and laugh-out-loud funny, one of the great men of letters of this age–or any age–holds forth on life, art, sex, politics, and the state of America’s soul. From his coming of age in America, to his formative war experiences, to his life as an artist, this is Vonnegut doing what he does best: Being himself. Whimsically illustrated by the author, A Man Without a Country is intimate, tender, and brimming with the scope of Kurt Vonnegut’s passions.Praise for A Man Without a Country“[This] may be as close as Vonnegut ever comes to a memoir.”Los Angeles Times“Like [that of] his literary ancestor Mark Twain, [Kurt Vonnegut’s] crankiness is good-humored and sharp-witted. . . . [Reading A Man Without a Country is] like sitting down on the couch for a long chat with an old friend.”–The New York Times Book Review “Filled with [Vonnegut’s] usual contradictory mix of joy and sorrow, hope and despair, humor and gravity.”Chicago Tribune “Fans will linger on every word . . . as once again [Vonnegut] captures the complexity of the human condition with stunning calligraphic simplicity.”The Australian “Thank God, Kurt Vonnegut has broken his promise that he will never write another book. In this wondrous assemblage of mini-memoirs, we discover his family’s legacy and his obstinate, unfashionable humanism.”–Studs Terkel
Reviews:
  • Silvermaster
KV creates by 'running off at the mind'. He has a great imagination, so everything around him prompts a response - some funny, or not, or prophetic, or insightful - just something. KV's always thinking - about literature, the arts, environmental problems, war, the family, the country, capitalism - and more, much more. "Running off at the mouth", we know, is not praiseworthy, but 'running off at the mind', a la KV, I'd say, is. KV has written here a nice little book. R. Amos, Severn MD
  • Foxanayn
Incredible book that will have to serve as a semi-memoir for a great man. This is the only book I've read by Vonnegut, but it was so good, I took my family to visit his memorial library in Indiana. My daughter read the book out loud on the way home. We were all very moved.
  • Xisyaco
Short, whimsical book. I happen to agree with Vonnegut on most things, so I found it enjoyable. It gives a picture of life in a simpler time, having to actually go out of your house to meet people and have conversations where manners matter. He describes himself as a humanist. I like that. Insightful, lighthearted read with some wisdom thrown in. I think this brief book is way overpriced, though.
  • Corgustari
Not as good as Wampeters, Foma, and Granfalloons, but it reminds me somewhat of a very loosely written version of it. It reads like an old friend* telling you stories you've already heard, if you've read any Vonnegut at all.

That said, it was a quick, enjoyable read and had some good parts, especially about fictional structure. It would be about the last place I would start if new to Vonnegut, though.
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*And by "old friend," I mean both one whom you have known for a long time and who is old.
  • Thomand
I think I've always given Kurt Vonnegut books 5 stars, but this is the only one I couldn't get into. A bit rambling; at times I felt as if he was writing down his thoughts and didn't go back to edit them before publishing it.
  • MarF
Anyone who writes or appreciates good writing marvels at Vonnegut's economy, humor and insight. I'd not read any Vonnegut for thirty years, but saw these essays on sale and found the master hadn't lost his touch even into his 80s. Short, heartfelt and resonating with humanity.
  • Love Me
"A husband, a wife and some kids is not a family. It's a terribly vulnerable survival unit." This is just one of the examples from "A Man Without a Country" that proves Kurt Vonnegut's brilliance. In just this topic - the demise of community and extended family - he captures much of what is wrong in our consumer-society of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

Kurt Vonnegut has long been an observer and commentator of the human condition through some of the most well-crafted prose ever written; and the latest happenings in a world that seems to have gone a bit mad have fueled a fire many of us thought retired at 84 and waiting for death (I seem to remember an interview where he mentions this). But, I am now convinced that our own self-inflicted injuries as a society have at least given us one bright hope...that Kurt Vonnegut might continue to live a long a productive life for a good deal longer. It is obvious that the current state of affairs in the world have Mr. Vonnegut mad - hopping mad - and he is writing about it.

While pointing out how messed up we are, Mr. Vonnegut is also telling us to lighten up. This book is hard to sum up in a short review, but I think that I will let one last quote from this fantastic book do the job for me: "We are here on Earth to fart around. Don't let anybody tell you any different."

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A Guide to my Book Rating System:

1 star = The wood pulp would have been better utilized as toilet paper.
2 stars = Don't bother, clean your bathroom instead.
3 stars = Wasn't a waste of time, but it was time wasted.
4 stars = Good book, but not life altering.
5 stars = This book changed my world in at least some small way.
As a long time Vonnegut fan, I found this somewhat interesting,
but it largely lacks the humor which makes his novels so successful. As he himself admits toward the end of the book, he has lost his sense of humor and become "grumpy." It consists largely of a long rant against humans, the American government, and especially George Bush and his administration.