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Viruses Vs. Superbugs: A Solution to the Antibiotics Crisis? (Macmillan Science) download ebook

by T. Häusler,Thomas Häusler

Viruses Vs. Superbugs: A Solution to the Antibiotics Crisis? (Macmillan Science) download ebook
ISBN:
0230551939
ISBN13:
978-0230551930
Author:
T. Häusler,Thomas Häusler
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan (January 1, 2006)
Language:
Pages:
298 pages
ePUB:
1455 kb
Fb2:
1592 kb
Other formats:
azw lrf mbr mobi
Category:
Medicine
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Phage therapy, like passive immunization, is a great "back to the future" medical story. It has gotten some attention from science journalists but, to date, everybody has just told part of the story.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In the US alone some 90, 000 people die from superbugs-bacteria that have grown immune to antibiotics. Officials agree that this problem will only get worse with time and new alternatives must be found. Thomas Hausler, in writing "Viruses vs Superbugs", has filled out the story and offers a persuasive case for phage therapy's continued relevance.

Authors: Häusler, . Häusler, Thomas. This book is scientific journalism at its best. Thomas Häusler paints a vivid and engaging picture of the larger-than-life characters who committed themselves to the development of phage therapy.

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T. Häusler; Thomas Häusler Viruses Vs. Superbugs: A Solution to the Antibiotics Crisis? (Macmillan Science). ISBN 13: 9781403987648. Viruses Vs. T. Häusler; Thomas Häusler.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 261-292) and index

Includes bibliographical references (p. 261-292) and index. At the limits of medicine - Invincible microbes - The wild pioneer era - The renaissance of phages during the war - A parallel universe - Keepers of the grail in peril - Resurrection - What's the future of phage therapy? -. - Append. 1. A short list of bacteria - Append. 2. The advantages and disadvantages of phage therapy.

Each year thousands of people die from bacteria resistant to antibiotics.

book by Thomas Hausler. In the US alone some 90,000 people die from superbugs-bacteria that have grown immune to antibiotics. Each year thousands of people die from bacteria resistant to antibiotics. Alternative drugs are urgently needed. A surprising ray of hope from the past are viruses that kill bacteria, but not us. Award-winning science journalist Thomas Häusler investigates how these long-forgotten cures may help sick people today.

I was reading a book on bacteria phages aka viruses that attack bacteria and they mentioned that in countries that used phages (. Soviet Russia due to a lack of antibiotics), the sewage plant is the first place they would go to look for phages to combat intestinal diseases. There were large amounts of the offending bacteria so it was a prime place to find viruses that had evolved to fight them. Fresh book recommendations delivered straight to your inbox every Thursday.

Mobile version (beta). Superbugs: A Solution to the Antibiotics Crisis? Thomas Hausler. Download (pdf, . 9 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Viruses vs. Superbugs book. Award-winning science journalist Thomas Hausler investigates how these long-forgotten cures may help sick people today.

item 2 Macmillan Science: Viruses vs. superbugs: a solution to the . superbugs: a solution to the antibiotics crisis? -Macmillan Science: Viruses vs. superbugs: a solution to the antibiotics crisis? £. 5. He has won several awards for his journalistic work, including one for an article about phage therapy in the world-renowned German weekly Die Zeit. Country of Publication.

Each year thousands of people die from bacteria resistant to antibiotics. Alternative drugs are urgently needed. A surprising ray of hope from the past are viruses that kill bacteria, but not us. Award-winning science journalist Thomas Häusler investigates how these long-forgotten cures may help sick people today.
Reviews:
  • Chillhunter
Phage therapy, like passive immunization, is a great "back to the future" medical story. It has gotten some attention from science journalists but, to date, everybody has just told part of the story. Thomas Hausler, in writing "Viruses vs Superbugs", has filled out the story and offers a persuasive case for phage therapy's continued relevance. The history chapters are especially fascinating. I was not previously aware of the extent to which epidemiological studies had been conducted.
  • spacebreeze
Even though I have done a fair amount of study of bacteriophages this book informed me of much I didn't know. For example, the use of phages during an epidemic in Los Angeles in the '40's. Well written and highly recommended for anyone intrested in the history of this subject.
  • Gindian
It is a very good book. Bacteriophages, Enterophages, Enterofagos, Align Probiotics, and much etc. to those type of lines. Great book.
  • Gigafish
This is mostly a history of bacteriophage therapy with an emphasis on the pioneering work of French bacteriologist Felix d'Herelle beginning before World War I. Much of the early work was done during the Great War in places like the Soviet Union to combat bacterial infection associated with battlefield wounds. D'Herelle himself went to such places as India to study cholera phages and was able to save the lives of many people.

Bacteriophages are viruses that exclusively attack bacteria much the same way other viruses attack our cells by invading and taking over the DNA machinery to reproduce themselves. After getting the bacterium to produce perhaps as many as a thousand or more viruses the phages burst open the bacteria cells walls with enzymes and flow out to attack other bacteria. With such a multiplier effect it doesn't take long to infect and destroy billions of bacteria. Typically there are some bacteria that are immune to the particular phage but their numbers are so small that our immune systems finish them off. Some of the cures in the book have been spectacular. Hausler reports on dying patients up and feeling fine in a day or two.

Over the years there were many such successes. However, because the actual studies and experiments were conducted with less rigor than modern standards require and because there were dosage problems and unsubstantiated claims, bacteriophage therapy has had a checkered history. When penicillin and other antibiotics came into widespread use in the forties, phage therapy was all but forgotten. Now with bacteria becoming more and more resistant to antibiotics, interest in phage therapy has returned. Hausler devotes a significant portion of the book to describing the problems and promises of phage therapy and explains why progress toward using phages against resistant bacteria has been so slow.

Where it seems likely that new successes will occur (and are occurring) is in veterinarian medicine. Until it becomes easier (and cheaper) to get phage products through the FDA in the US, most of the work will probably be with animals, especially those animals like cows, pigs, and chickens that become our food. With part of the problem of bacteria becoming resistant to antibiotics due to their use in animal feed, using phage therapy instead, or in combination with antibiotics, could become widespread.

While it is true that bacteria evolve and become resistant to their phages, it is also true that phages themselves can evolve to bypass bacterial resistance. In other words there is a primordial "arms war" going on between phages and bacteria of which we can take advantage. One method microbiologists use to find phages that work against specific bacteria is to take water from sewers where the bacteria have been excreted from people or animals and search that water for phages. There will be found the phages that have evolved to attack the bacteria that have evolved!

The book has plenty of endnotes and a good index. Of special interest perhaps are the appendices, one listing common bacteria and what they do to us, and the other detailing the advantages and disadvantages of phage therapy.

All and all this is a good introduction to an exciting and promising area of medical science. But note well the question mark at the end of the book's subtitle: "A Solution to the Antibiotic Crisis?" It would appear that phage therapy will not solve the crisis by itself, but will most likely allow us to rely less on antibiotics, thereby allowing some antibiotics to be used for longer periods of time before bacterial resistance sets in.