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At War with PTSD: Battling Post Traumatic Stress Disorder with Virtual Reality download ebook

by Robert N. McLay MD PhD

At War with PTSD: Battling Post Traumatic Stress Disorder with Virtual Reality download ebook
ISBN:
1421405571
ISBN13:
978-1421405575
Author:
Robert N. McLay MD PhD
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press; 1 edition (April 16, 2012)
Language:
Pages:
216 pages
ePUB:
1289 kb
Fb2:
1918 kb
Other formats:
mobi docx lrf rtf
Category:
Medicine
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.7

by Robert N. McLay MD PhD (Author). At War With PTSD provides yet another enlightening perspective. Hopefully Virtual Reality (VR) methods of PTSD treatment will be developed much further and incorporated into general treatment programs

by Robert N. ISBN-13: 978-1421405575. Hopefully Virtual Reality (VR) methods of PTSD treatment will be developed much further and incorporated into general treatment programs. VR tools seem sensible and with the proper upfront investment will probably prove quite cost effective.

At War with PTSD book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

At War with PTSD book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

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As a practicing psychiatrist who works with Veterans and civilians coping with PTSD, McLay had known for years before the September 11, 2001, attacks that effective treatments for the condition were elusive. When active duty called, he met the challenge, becoming the primary investigator on PTSD treatment projects that had Service Members face the ghosts of war in a computer simulator.

Navy psychiatrist Robert N. McLay has been at the forefront of these efforts. This is his story of using virtual reality to treat Service Members and Veterans with PTSD

Navy psychiatrist Robert N. This is his story of using virtual reality to treat Service Members and Veterans with PTSD. As a practicing psychiatrist who works with Veterans and civilians coping with PTSD, McLay had known for years before the September 11, 2001, attacks that effective treatments for the condition were elusive.

Symptoms may include disturbing thoughts, feelings, or dreams related to the events, mental or physical distress to trauma-related cues, attempts to avoid trauma-related cues, alterations in how a person thinks and feels, and an increase in the fight-or-flight response. This is his story of using virtual reality to treat Service Members and Veterans with PTSD

Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. War play: Video games and the future of armed conflict.

Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. Rizzo, . Difede, . Rothbaum, . Reger, . Spitalnick, . Cukor, J. and Mclay, R. (2010) Development and early evaluation on the Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan 27. Mil-bot fetishism: The pataphysics of military robots TOPIA: The Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies (23-24): 286-303.

Virtual Reality (VR) delivered exposure therapy for PTSD has been used with reports of positive outcomes. The aim of the current paper is to present the rationale and brief description of a Virtual Iraq PTSD VR therapy application and present initial findings from its use with PTSD patients. Thus far, Virtual Iraq consists of a series of customizable virtual scenarios designed to represent relevant Middle Eastern VR contexts for exposure therapy, including a city and desert road convoy environment.

The Spartans called it The Trembler; recent history has seen it termed shell shock, combat fatigue, soldier’s heart, and Vietnam Syndrome. Whatever the name, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has always been with us. With 20 percent of the Veterans of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq exhibiting PTSD symptoms, the United States military has a strong interest in combating the condition. Navy psychiatrist Robert N. McLay has been at the forefront of these efforts. This is his story of using virtual reality to treat Service Members and Veterans with PTSD.

As a practicing psychiatrist who works with Veterans and civilians coping with PTSD, McLay had known for years before the September 11, 2001, attacks that effective treatments for the condition were elusive. When active duty called, he met the challenge, becoming the primary investigator on PTSD treatment projects that had Service Members face the ghosts of war in a computer simulator. After using this new form of exposure therapy on the home front, McLay and his team believed they had found a promising way to work with warriors broken by combat, so in 2008 they took it to the front line in Fallujah, Iraq, with the First Marine Expeditionary Force.

Several years into the project, McLay recounts openly and with bleak honesty the successes, failures, and limits of virtual reality treatment for PTSD. Filled with poignant firsthand accounts of war and its psychological aftermath, At War with PTSD explains the difficulties of using this specialized technology in the field and discusses such challenges as helping people who refuse to believe in PTSD, including those diagnosed with it. So far, the virtual reality program shows more promise than traditional therapies. And although McLay remains unsure why or how, his experiences hold out hope for those suffering from this devastating disorder.

Reviews:
  • Enditaling
As a Female Combat Veteran (three tours in Iraq from 2003-2006) and a former patient at the hospital where Dr. McLay works, I can say without a doubt that this is the best written book on Virtual Reality Therapy to date!
Having gone through Virtual Reality therapy myself, and having personally attended Doc's "Open Groups," I can promise that you'll be reading 100% honesty. No fluff, no BS.
Dr. McLay's contribution to the research and treatment of Active Duty service members (and veterans) has been revolutionary and heartfelt.
This book was informative, easy to digest (Not loaded with confusing Medical or Military jargon), and was hard to put down.
Thank you Doc: For your service in a combat zone, your advocacy for veterans, and for your continued hard work in helping PTSD sufferers like myself learn to 'silence the Beast' and find our New Normal.
  • Mot
My husband ordered this for a friend, and he and his wife both read the book and found it informative. Highly recommend this book.
  • ACOS
This book was very insightful and something that I think spouses and civilian clinicians should read. This book was easy to read and relate to as a military spouse.
  • Deodorant for your language
daughter of 16 ordered for report, book was very well written
  • Gholbimand
Since the Iraq War began on March 20, 2003, I've watched all the documentaries available and read many accounts from Americans that served there. At War With PTSD provides yet another enlightening perspective. The use of virtual reality technology in diagnosing and treating post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was really the secondary theme.

The book is a personal account and view from the author, Robert McLay, on what war does to combatants. McLay, a psychiatrist, gives a thoughtful analysis of the psychological toll of war on service men and women from being with them in the field. His presence in various places in Iraq alongside troops gives him gravitas and helps him to be engaging.

I found McLay's coverage of combat veterans' return home to be by far the most profound section. After everything the troops went through that already requires so much effort and even luck to be able to deal with, the homecoming adds a new set of problems. Returning troops have to deal with having fallen behind on everything in their lives due to having spent time at the front. The back home world has gone on without them and the world is indifferent.

Hopefully Virtual Reality (VR) methods of PTSD treatment will be developed much further and incorporated into general treatment programs. VR tools seem sensible and with the proper upfront investment will probably prove quite cost effective. While McLay is a good advocate for VR methods, his exploration of PTSD makes this book potentially a classic.
  • Mildorah
It has taken me months to get to this review. As a person who studied PTSD back in graduate and undergraduate school (during the Gulf War) I have always been very deep into the subject matter and the populations effected by PTSD.

This book does read more like a memoir than it does as practical advice for clinicians. However, I think that is by design. This is more a book of stories and vignettes and how technology has been instituted to assist those with PTSD. While virtual reality and PTSD is not completely new (I have seen this approach covered for the past 5 years at least) I don't think I have seen many first person accounts out there.

So, who is the correct audience for this book? The layperson who is interested in this approach and perhaps the practitioner who wants to understand a little bit more about VR and it's use for a disorder like PTSD.

This is a book of accounts and stories, it isn't a clinical handbook.

Still very, very fascinating.
  • Lonesome Orange Kid
I chose this book to review since 1) I am an Iraqi War veteran and 2) one of my friends is a clinical psychologist who works for the military. I wanted to learn more about what she hears every day from military personnel suffering from PTSD.

To my surprise, this book isn't so much a medical journal, it's more of the author's experiences as a Navy psychiatrist in Fallujah in 2008. He changes the names of his patients but the stories he tells all relate to brain injuries, deafening IEDs, and the trauma that both patient and survivors feel after the attack is over. Some of his observations are pretty graphic, and some of the deaths he mentions heartwretching.

I enjoyed the stories. The chapters are short and well-focused, but the longer I read them the more I wondered when the virtual reality (VR) would come in. VR doesn't come in till the end, as treatment to make patients realize they can overcome PTSD by taking on the demons from the start. This lack of in-depth VR is fine with me as I found the stories heartbreaking and varied (he clearly shows women can get PTSD, too), but I was expecting a more medically-focused narrative with big Latin words and lots of military jargon. His patients are varied with different issues, all to show how PTSD can manifest itself in people from varied backgrounds. He also shows how even the military can be its own enemy at attempting to treat its warriors with PTSD: there still is a stigma attached to those who seek medical help for this illness. I wonder if it's the military that is the "At War with" part of the title.

This is not a highly detailed nor very wordy book. It can be read in a day or two. And although McJay does quote medical research and other doctors, this is not a scholarly work. This is a layman's read and worth a read for anyone who knows anyone with PTSD. McLay mentions from the start that those with PTSD usually have other personality disorders that only are worsened from PTSD: bipolar disorder, depression, drug/alcohol addiction, etc. Many also have an underlying anger that has been festering from earlier events, most which began in childhood.

I enjoyed the writing style (5) but I also feel the title is misleading (3), making this a solid 4-star book worth reading.