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The Colony: The Harrowing True Story of the Exiles of Molokai download ebook

by John Tayman

The Colony: The Harrowing True Story of the Exiles of Molokai download ebook
ISBN:
074323300X
ISBN13:
978-0743233002
Author:
John Tayman
Publisher:
Scribner (January 9, 2006)
Language:
Pages:
432 pages
ePUB:
1873 kb
Fb2:
1699 kb
Other formats:
lrf lit docx rtf
Category:
Medicine
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.7

The Colony: The Harrowing True Story of the Exiles of Molokai.

The Colony: The Harrowing True Story of the Exiles of Molokai.

I had known stories about the colony on Molokai since I was a little ki.

I had known stories about the colony on Molokai since I was a little kid. The story of St. Damien was well known in my Catholic school. I learned so much from reading this book, however. It is a story that deserves to be better known and this is a good place to start. Tayman provides insights into the decision-making process, the panic of the time, and the personal suffering of the victims who were essentially sent away to die even though they had committed no crime and were blameless for their conditions. I highly recommend this book.

Here, for the first time, John Tayman reveals the complete history of the Molokai settlement and its unforgettable inhabitants

Here, for the first time, John Tayman reveals the complete history of the Molokai settlement and its unforgettable inhabitants. It's an epic of ruthless manhunts, thrilling escapes, bizarre medical experiments, and tragic, irreversible error.

Tayman points out the great irony of leprosy: it's not a particularly contagious disease, and only a small percentage of the total population is even genetically susceptible to it. But fear and misunderstanding (including misinterpretation of related Old Testament injunctions) resulted in a terrible toll on those who were sent to Kalaupapa. Dil: İNGİLİZCE Kategori: TARİH Çeviren: E-kitap hakkında daha fazla bilgi.

John Tayman, has marvelously succeeded in this sweeping history of the exiles of Molokai

John Tayman, has marvelously succeeded in this sweeping history of the exiles of Molokai. It bears tragic witness to the banishment of the victims of Hansen's disease to a hostile isolated island beginning in 1866 with twelve men and women and one stowaway child and continuing for over a century. Along the way we are confronted with legislative debates such as, "Is it a crime to be afflicted with leprosy?" and although the necessary answer is no, it is a disease, in actual fact these people were treated as criminals.

The cover photograph Tayman has chosen is not of the cliffs of Molokai, but of a coastline in Italy. The book begins with the story of Kaluaikoolau (known as Koolau), who had leprosy, his wife, Piilani, and their flight from the law and exile to Kalaupapa. The first superintendent of Kalaupapa National Historical Park, Henry Law, discovered this discrepancy. According to Tayman, Awaiting him there, was a life sentence of unspeakable horror. The paragraph proceeds to recount in graphic detail the rumors about what happened to patients at Kalaupapa.

He has produced a great book for the casual reader accustomed to the descriptive "sound-bite," but one that is disappointing for the historian trying to fit the colony into Hawaiian history. Most disturbing is the book's portrayal of the early colony as a place of misery, imprisonment, and lawlessness, with "epic battles erupting over food, water, blankets, and women" (p. 2). This colonial image is revitalized by omitting or committing to footnotes the evidence that contradicts it.

Colony: The Harrowing True Story of the Exiles of Molokai Tayman John Random House (USA) 9781400102273 : In the bestselling tradition of In the Heart of the Sea, The Colony reveals the untold. 2006 Язык: ENG Размер: 1. 5 x 1. 7 x . 9 cm Поставляется из: США Описание: In the bestselling tradition of In the Heart of the Sea, The Colony reveals the untold history of the infamous American leprosy colony on Molokai and of the extraordinary people who struggled to survive under the most horrific circumstances.

In the bestselling tradition of "In the Heart of the Sea," "The Colony" reveals the untold history of the infamous American leprosy colony on Molokai and of the extraordinary people who struggled to survive under the most horrific circumstances. In 1866, twelve men and women and one small child were forced aboard a leaky schooner and cast away to a natural prison on the Hawaiian island of Molokai. Two weeks later, a dozen others were exiled, and then forty more, and then a hundred more. Tracked by bounty hunters and torn screaming from their families, the luckless were loaded into shipboard cattle stalls and abandoned in a lawless place where brutality held sway. Many did not have leprosy, and most of those who did were not contagious, yet all were caught in a shared nightmare. The colony had little food, little medicine, and very little hope. Exile continued for more than a century, the longest and deadliest instance of medical segregation in American history. Nearly nine thousand people were banished to the colony, trapped by pounding surf and armed guards and the highest sea cliffs in the world. Twenty-eight live there still. John Tayman tells the fantastic saga of this horrible and hopeful place -- at one time the most famous community in the world -- and of the individuals involved. From the very first exile -- a gentle part-time lawyer trapped in an unjust ordeal beyond his imagination -- to the last remaining residents, the narrative is peopled by presidents and kings, cruel lawmen and pioneering doctors, and brave souls who literally gave their lives to help. A stunning cast includes the martyred Father Damien, Robert Louis Stevenson, Jack London, Mark Twain, Teddy Roosevelt, John Wayne, and more. The result is a searing tale of survival and bravery, and a testament to the power of faith, compassion, and heroism.
Reviews:
  • you secret
I was recently fortunate enough to travel to Hawaii. While there, it had been one of my goals to visit the former leper colony on Molokai (which is now a National Park). This turned out to be considerable more difficult than I expected and I was unable to make the journey; however, in advance of my hoped-for trip, I read this book. In it, Mr. Tayman has provided a detailed, yet readable, history of leprosy in Hawaii.

As a Catholic, I was initially interested in the recently canonized saints, Damien and Marianne Cope, who spent decades working with the exiles on Molokai. Certainly, Mr. Tayman gives them their due. Fr. Damien, who was only meant to spend a few months on the island, is thrust into fame, and spends the rest of his life there, eventually contracting the disease himself. Sr. Marianne, on the other hand, leads a group of nuns to the island and works for decades before succumbing to old age.

However, Mr. Tayman has much more to tell us than the story of two saints. He describes the origin of the colony in the nineteenth century and the struggle of making it even barely functional in its early years. He recounts its rise to prominence/infamy with famous visitors like Mark Twain, Jack London, and Robert Lewis Stevenson. He also takes the time to describe the disease itself: it two types, the rarity of being able to develop the disease even when infected, the progress of the disease, and the efforts made to understand and combat it.

And yet, in the end, the most important thing in this book is probably his stories of the native Hawaiian who were horribly impacted by the existence of the colony. They were systematically rounded up and forced to live in this substandard place because of misunderstanding and fear of leprosy. For many years, until the disease was better understood, a number of people without the disease were exiled. Most shocking of all, perhaps, is the fact that this colony was kept in use until very recently, late into the twentieth century. Even now, people who were once exiles, continue to live there (which is why visiting is restricted).

I had known stories about the colony on Molokai since I was a little kid. The story of St. Damien was well known in my Catholic school. I learned so much from reading this book, however. It is a story that deserves to be better known and this is a good place to start.
  • Hunaya
This is a great accounting of life on Molokai during the outbreak of leprosy on the islands. Leprosy, being a devastating disease left many people in a state of shock and confusion. Families were torn apart, hope dashed, but for a handful of people who rallied around, the people of the island regained their self esteem and lived a good life, not by rich standards, but by necessity of living life with what they had. It's well written with illustrations that define the life on Molokai during the leprosy invasion.
  • Maximilianishe
John Tayman's book is a fascinating account of a little known bit of Hawaiian history and the disgraceful treatment of victims of a horrible disease as if they were criminals. Panicky over what was mistakenly believed to be a highly contagious disease, leprosy, the government of the Kingdom of Hawaii banished, or exiled, persons diagnosed (often mis-diagnosed) with the disease to the Kalaupapa Peninsula on Molokai. Tayman provides insights into the decision-making process, the panic of the time, and the personal suffering of the victims who were essentially sent away to die even though they had committed no crime and were blameless for their conditions. I highly recommend this book.
  • Gravelblade
A fascinating and well-written account of a little-known event in American history (unless you happen to be Catholic and knew all about Father Damien, as I did!). For decades, people with leprosy (known known as Hansen's Disease) were rounded up like criminals and forced to live in squalid conditions on the Hawaiian island of Molokai until they died. This was because of the mistaken belief that leprosy was highly contagious (it's not, except in its earliest stages). Tayman paints detailed portraits of both the inmates and their "jailers" so they become like characters in a horror story.
  • Amhirishes
Overall I liked this book. I think the author largely achieved what he set out to, which was to tell the story of the lepers of Molokai and tell it in a way that could hold your attention throughout the book.

This book was not however perfect. My main criticism was the constant flow of characters coming in/out of the story, especially all the outsiders (IE members of the board of health). I was often left with questions such as "who was this person again?". I must admit I read this somewhat sporadically over a months time, so that could have had some to do with it, but I did find the sheer number of people presented a bit over the top. This criticism aside, I still found it to be an enjoyable read and would recommend it to anyone who has an interest in this kind of story.
  • Little Devil
Our book club broke it into assigned parts after each of us reported being overwhelmed by the confusing chronology and massive information. Alas....we all came to appreciate the book in doing so with several of us going back and reading a part or two. Felt like the author could have edited down so much of his material and given us a better "flow".
  • nadness
This book tells the true story of some American history that is very troubling. The book is well written and I hung on every word. The author has the ability to draw you in and tell a story that needs to be told. It also makes me want to revisit the island if Molokai.
Excellent and informative book. I saw the old church from a boat when I was out on the ocean in Maui. Having seen the area that the book is set in, it really carried me back. So sad what they went through. Highly recommend this book.