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Poison, Detection and the Victorian Imagination (Encounters) download ebook

by Ian Burney

Poison, Detection and the Victorian Imagination (Encounters) download ebook
ISBN:
0719073766
ISBN13:
978-0719073762
Author:
Ian Burney
Publisher:
Manchester University Press; 1 edition (June 15, 2007)
Language:
Pages:
224 pages
ePUB:
1133 kb
Fb2:
1472 kb
Other formats:
mbr rtf lrf lrf
Category:
Medicine
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

Start by marking Poison, Detection and the Victorian Imagination as Want to Read . The investigation commences with an overview of the practice of toxicology in the Victorian This fascinating book looks at the phenomenon of murder and poisoning in the nineteenth century

Start by marking Poison, Detection and the Victorian Imagination as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The investigation commences with an overview of the practice of toxicology in the Victorian This fascinating book looks at the phenomenon of murder and poisoning in the nineteenth century. Focusing on the case of William Palmer, a medical doctor who in 1856 was convicted of murder by poisoning, it examines how his case baffled toxicologists, doctors, detectives and judges.

and others published Poison Detection and the Victorian Imagination. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2006.

Request PDF On Apr 1, 2008, Angus McLaren and others published Poison Detection and the Victorian Imagination. Article in Journal of Interdisciplinary History 38(4):595-596 · April 2008 with 7 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

In this short, thought-provoking book, Ian Burney argues that murder by poisoning occupied a special place in the mid-Victorian cultural and psychic landscape, and that as a result, the detection of poison enjoyed a privileged position as well, for a brief period in the 1850s. Using the 1856 William Palmer case as focus, prism, and touchstone, Burney explores "criminal poisoning and the social, cultural, legal and scientific responses it elicited" (p. 3). To address these various spheres, Burney launches a truly interdisciplinary investigation in which medical, legal, philosophical,.

We also have Ian Burney’s Poison, Detection, and the Victorian Imagination, a brief but detailed examination of the historical, cultural, and literary facets of poison in the mid-19th century

We also have Ian Burney’s Poison, Detection, and the Victorian Imagination, a brief but detailed examination of the historical, cultural, and literary facets of poison in the mid-19th century. The book opens with a bang, telling us that in 1827, throat cutting might have been seen as the honest way of killing, but by 1859 Victorians had begun to recognize the delights of ‘a good poisoning case’, in which the criminal ‘moves through circumstances of mystery. nd keeps brains puzzling, and hearts throbbing, and betting books going, until the verdict is given

Poison, detection and the Victorian imagination Encounters MUP. Jeremy Deleo.

Poison, detection and the Victorian imagination Encounters MUP.

Encounters: Cultural Histories. Jennifer Tucker, "Ian Burney, Poison, Detection, and the Victorian Imagination. " The Journal of Modern History 80, no. 3 (September 2008): 646-648. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Going for an Indian : South Asian Restaurants and the Limits of Multiculturalism in Britain. Mistakes and Myths: The Allies, Germany, and the Versailles Treaty, 1918–1921.

Here Ian Burney shows how the extraordinary case of a doctor, hanged in 1856 for allegedly poisoning an acquaintance, threw up deep-rooted anxieties about poison, detection, and professionalism in Victorian society. I am innocent of poisoning Cook by strychnine'. With these words the doctor William Palmer went to the scaffold, convicted of having perpetrated the very crime he denied to the last.

Poison, detection and the Victorian imagination more. Ian Burney has just completed his P. in History at the University of California at Berkeley. Publication Date: Jan 1, 1999. Publication Date: Jan 1, 1994.

This fascinating book looks at the phenomenon of murder and poisoning in the nineteenth century. Focusing on the case of William Palmer, a medical doctor who in 1856 was convicted of murder by poisoning, it examines how his case baffled toxicologists, doctors, detectives and judges. The investigation commences with an overview of the practice of toxicology in the Victorian era, and goes on to explore the demands imposed by legal testimony on scientific work to convict criminals. In addressing Palmer's trial, Burney focuses on the testimony of Alfred Swaine Taylor, a leading expert on poisons, and integrates the medical, legal and literary evidence to make sense of the trial itself and the sinister place of poison in wider Victorian society. Ian Burney has produced an exemplary work of cultural history, mixing a keen understanding of the contemporary social and cultural landscape with the scientific and medical history of the period.