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Shadow of the Scorpion download ebook

by Asher Neal

Shadow of the Scorpion download ebook
ISBN:
033047877X
ISBN13:
978-0330478779
Author:
Asher Neal
Publisher:
Pan Macmillan (2010)
Language:
ePUB:
1273 kb
Fb2:
1723 kb
Other formats:
doc txt azw mobi
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

Читать онлайн Shadow of the Scorpion. She could have uploaded a recording of the book straight to her crystal mind, so Cormac guessed this was all for show.

Читать онлайн Shadow of the Scorpion. Shadow of the scorpion. A Novel Of The Polity.

SHADOW OF THE SCORPION A Novel Of The Polity Neal Asher. As they flew above it, it raised its front end off the ground and waved its antennae at them, then raised one armoured claw as if to snip them out of the sky. A giant iron scorpion. For Caroline, as always. What's that?" he asked, supposing it some excavating machine controlled by the AI. With a frown his mother replied, "War drone," then put the gravcar back on course and took them away.

Even though Neal Asher's "Shadow of the Scorpion" (first published in 2008) was the 9th book he wrote in his "Polity Universe" (begun in 2001), in book time, it's currently the 2nd book in the series and is a prequel to his "Agent Cormac" sub-series

Even though Neal Asher's "Shadow of the Scorpion" (first published in 2008) was the 9th book he wrote in his "Polity Universe" (begun in 2001), in book time, it's currently the 2nd book in the series and is a prequel to his "Agent Cormac" sub-series. Essentially, it covers a segment of Cormac's childhood and his first, formative, missions as he enters Polity service. Except for what appears to be his standard two entirely spurious, fairly graphic (but short), sex scenes, it's a fine book written in the same style and quality as the other books.

Asher Neal - скачать бесплатно все книги автора. Книги 1-14 из 14. Brass Man. Жанр: Космическая фантастика. The knight errant Anderson is hunting a dragon on the primitive Out-Polity world of Cull, little knowing that far away a man - more technology than human flesh - has resurrected a brass killing machine to assist in a similar.

In Neal Asher's Shadow of the Scorpion, Cormac is haunted by childhood memories of a sinister scorpion-shaped war . Shadow of the Scorpion isn’t a very big book, compared to other entries in the Polity series.

In Neal Asher's Shadow of the Scorpion, Cormac is haunted by childhood memories of a sinister scorpion-shaped war drone and the burden of losses he doesn’t remember. In the years following the war he signs up with Earth Central Security, an "Ian Cormac was raised to adulthood during the end of the war between the human Polity and the vicious arthropoid race, the Prador. She turned and gazed at Cormac for a moment.

Shadow of the Scorpion. Raised to adulthood during the end of the war between the human Polity and a vicious alien race, the Prador, Ian Cormac is haunted by childhood memories of a sinister scorpion-shaped war drone and the burden of losses he doesn’t remember

Shadow of the Scorpion. Publisher: Night Shade Books, 2008. Raised to adulthood during the end of the war between the human Polity and a vicious alien race, the Prador, Ian Cormac is haunted by childhood memories of a sinister scorpion-shaped war drone and the burden of losses he doesn’t remember. Transformation, book one. Neal asher. An imprint of start publishing. Polity Agent. First published in the United Kingdom by Tor, an imprint of Pan Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited.

Neal Asher divides his time between Essex and Crete, mostly at a keyboard and mentally light-years away. Also set in the same world of the Polity are these standalone novels: Hilldiggers, Prador Moon, Shadow of the Scorpion and The Technician. His full-length novels are as follows. The Transformation trilogy is also based in the Polity: Dark Intelligence, War Factory and Infinity Engine. Set in a dystopian future are: The Departure, Zero Point and Jupiter War, while Cowl takes us across time.

Though this is the fifth Ian Cormac book, it is a prequel to the rest of the series

Though this is the fifth Ian Cormac book, it is a prequel to the rest of the series. It follows 23-year-old Earth Central Security soldier Cormac on his very first mission, to the planet of Hagren, which has been devastated in an attack by the implacable crab-like Prador aliens. Despite some infelicities of prose, The Shadow of the Scorpion skilfully combines graphic action and sensitive characterisation and is Asher's most accomplished novel to date.

Reviews:
  • Vetitc
Even though Neal Asher's "Shadow of the Scorpion" (first published in 2008) was the 9th book he wrote in his "Polity Universe" (begun in 2001), in book time, it's currently the 2nd book in the series and is a prequel to his "Agent Cormac" sub-series. Essentially, it covers a segment of Cormac's childhood and his first, formative, missions as he enters Polity service. Except for what appears to be his standard two entirely spurious, fairly graphic (but short), sex scenes, it's a fine book written in the same style and quality as the other books in the series I've read. If you've read any of the books in the series and enjoyed it, then this one is for you. I'm rating it at a Very Good 4 stars out of 5.
  • Clandratha
Prequels released late to capitalize on the popularity of the series, and being essentially historical backfill? We've all read/seen the trend, but Asher makes it happen without lightening the plot load, and produces a stimulating psychological profile of Agent Cormac. Whether you consider the work to be a war satire, character biography, or a gritty sharp backhand techno-military adventure--you will be satiated in all things Polity. Asher sez war is hell on MANY levels...sure 'nuff--powerfull stuff.
  • Unde
I'm chalking my review score of "Shadow of the Scorpion" which is 4 out of 5 stars up to pure selfishness. Did I love this prequel to one of the most badass Syfy heroes I have ever read; hearing about how the infamous Ian Cormac came to be? Hell yeah. Getting the back-story on how and why Ian ended up joining the ECS, his stint with the Sparkind, and his fated meeting with his sick weapon `Shuirken,' all made this work a prized read that I devoured with every opportunity I had to sneak my kindle out of my purse. The villains were devious, the spacecraft AI was brilliantly unique (the Sadist was an intriguing vessel. While not in the same league as the Occam Razor, it did handle business) and tech was mind-blowing. But... this book was not thick enough!!!

Shadow of the Scorpion introduces a viciously, complex and utterly awesome scorpion war drone by the name of `Amistad,' who possesses information regarding Ian's deceased father. And while through ninety percent of the book, others (namely Ian's mother and ECS) prevent Amistad from sharing his secrets with the young Cormac, when you the reader hear what Amistad has to confess (and especially if you are a rabid Asher fan) you will wonder where the other 300 pages of the book are.

I mean let me honest, the parts about his early life with his mother and brother are cool, Ian's early training bits were cool, and his first missions--well they were mighty impressive, but the abrupt end of the book left me with the knowledge that there was something much more massive that the author wasn't showing us. You kind of get the message early that machines and AI have more emotions and depth than most humans (Ian included) but the finality of the ending proves that in spades! I was actually shaken by the chill of it.
Still...Neal Asher rules...he just needs to do another Cormac novel...After he wraps up the Owner series...
  • Macill
In Shadow of the Scorpion, we get a look back at the childhood and early adult years of our good friend Ian Cormac. Every chapter starts with a few pages of young Ian's life with his mother and brother, then skips to the events that led to Cormac becoming an ECS agent. As always, Asher gives us further depth and detail in describing his Polity universe, and provides not only a well-paced, rousing story but a number of interesting characters and a good bit of insight into Cormac's character itself, during its formative years. The book also fills in some background about Ian Cormac, and answers some questions about how things came to be.

A danger/pitfall in writing prequels is the fact that we have read stories that take place after the events in the prequel, possibly taking away the suspense and fear we might have for the primary character. There is none of this in Shadow of the Scorpion - it's certainly a page turner and a wild ride. My only criticism lies in the obviousness of one of the plot points - something revealed in the last few pages was obvious about a third of the way through the book.

I highly recommend it for any Asher/Ian Cormac fan. I woudn't read it out of sequence - if you're new to the Cormac novels, by all means read them in order of publication.
  • Djang
Enjoyed this "prequel" to Gridlinked very much. I found the content dealing with Ian Cormac's childhood a little slow-paced and occasionally tedious but overall the story was interesting and made me want to keep going. I had read several of the other "Agent Cormac" books before this one. While I enjoy Asher's plots quite a bit, character-wise I find his Cormac kind of "opaque" and somewhat unsympathetic. Shadow of the Scorpion did not illuminate Cormac all that much more for me. Never the less, SotS is an entertaining read.