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DNA: The Secret of Life download ebook

by James D. Watson,Andrew Berry

DNA: The Secret of Life download ebook
ISBN:
0375710078
ISBN13:
978-0375710070
Author:
James D. Watson,Andrew Berry
Publisher:
Knopf; Reprint edition (January 1, 2003)
Language:
Pages:
464 pages
ePUB:
1582 kb
Fb2:
1219 kb
Other formats:
lrf rtf lrf lit
Category:
Evolution
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

In his 2003 book "DNA: The Secret of Life" molecular biologist James D Watson gives the reader an in depth tour of genetics, it's history, where it stands today and . Andrew Berry's writing made this an interesting book.

In his 2003 book "DNA: The Secret of Life" molecular biologist James D Watson gives the reader an in depth tour of genetics, it's history, where it stands today and where it's going tomorrow. Watson's colleague, Francis Crick, wrote "An Astonishing Hypothesis" himself and it was a painful thing to read.

Download books for free. Fifty years ago, James D. Watson, then just twentyfour, helped launch the greatest ongoing scientific quest of our time. Having shown that the secret of life is chemical, modern genetics has set mankind off on a journey unimaginable just a few decades ago. Watson provides the general reader with clear explanations of molecular processes and emerging technologies.

Andrew Berry, James D. Watson. Matt Ridley, author of Genome "Only James Watson could have written this book: no one else knows DNA from so many er, scientific leader, author of one of the great scientific memoirs of all timeand no one else writes in such an utterly riveting and independent manner. DNA is a singularly lucid life story of a molecule and its determining role in human nature, society, medicine, and our future as a species. It is an important book and a delight to read. -Kay Redfield Jamison, P.

James . 1928DNA: the secret of life /James D. Watson, with Andrew Berry. Publisher Neil Patterson joined one of us, James D. Watson, in dreaming up a multifaceted venture including this book, a television series, and additional more avowedly educational projects.

Distributed by Random House, In. New York. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-375-41546-7 1. Genetics-Popular works. 2. DNA-Popular works.

By James D. Watson and Andrew Berry. JAMES D. WATSON was director of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York from 1968 to 1993 and is now its. By James D. WATSON was director of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York from 1968 to 1993 and is now it. ore about James D. ANDREW BERRY is a lecturer on Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University.

DNA: The Secret of Life was conceived over dinner in 1999. Under discussion was how best to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the discovery the double helix.

Having shown that the secret of life is chemical, modern genetics has set mankind off on a journey unimaginable just a few decades ago. He shows us how DNA continues to alter our understanding of human origins, and of our identities as groups and as individuals.

What makes DNA different from hordes of competitors purporting to help readers understand genetics is that it is written by none other than James Watson, of Watson. Tells the big picture. com User, March 21, 2006. This book was a lot of fun to read and I really felt like I learned a lot after I finished. The book talks about genetically modified food and how there was such an outcry by the public when it first came in to the market. People didn't want to eat "Frankestien food".

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Francis Crick and James Watson: And the Building Blocks of Life (Oxford Portraits in Science). DNA: The Secret of Life. Watson, Andrew Berry. 572 Kb. Watson, Tania A. Baker, Stephen P. Bell, Alexander Gann, Michael Levine, Richard Losick.

Fifty years ago, James D. Watson, then just twentyfour, helped launch the greatest ongoing scientific quest of our time. Now, with unique authority and sweeping vision, he gives us the first full account of the genetic revolution—from Mendel’s garden to the double helix to the sequencing of the human genome and beyond.Watson’s lively, panoramic narrative begins with the fanciful speculations of the ancients as to why “like begets like” before skipping ahead to 1866, when an Austrian monk named Gregor Mendel first deduced the basic laws of inheritance. But genetics as we recognize it today—with its capacity, both thrilling and sobering, to manipulate the very essence of living things—came into being only with the rise of molecular investigations culminating in the breakthrough discovery of the structure of DNA, for which Watson shared a Nobel prize in 1962. In the DNA molecule’s graceful curves was the key to a whole new science.Having shown that the secret of life is chemical, modern genetics has set mankind off on a journey unimaginable just a few decades ago. Watson provides the general reader with clear explanations of molecular processes and emerging technologies. He shows us how DNA continues to alter our understanding of human origins, and of our identities as groups and as individuals. And with the insight of one who has remained close to every advance in research since the double helix, he reveals how genetics has unleashed a wealth of possibilities to alter the human condition—from genetically modified foods to genetically modified babies—and transformed itself from a domain of pure research into one of big business as well. It is a sometimes topsy-turvy world full of great minds and great egos, driven by ambitions to improve the human condition as well as to improve investment portfolios, a world vividly captured in these pages.Facing a future of choices and social and ethical implications of which we dare not remain uninformed, we could have no better guide than James Watson, who leads us with the same bravura storytelling that made The Double Helix one of the most successful books on science ever published. Infused with a scientist’s awe at nature’s marvels and a humanist’s profound sympathies, DNA is destined to become the classic telling of the defining scientific saga of our age.From the Hardcover edition.
Reviews:
  • Naril
At the heart of every cell lies a collection of molecules that hold the key to biology's incredible diversity: DNA. In his 2003 book "DNA: The Secret of Life" molecular biologist James D Watson gives the reader an in depth tour of genetics, it's history, where it stands today and where it's going tomorrow. In the early 1950s Watson, along with Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins, codiscovered the hidden structure of DNA, for which they shared the 1962 Nobel Prize. That discovery is pretty well covered in "The Double Helix" so, if you've read that one, this book may be covering some familiar ground for you. But if you, like me, have not read TDH then DNA will serve as a good introduction to that era. Watson covers the early history of genetics starting in the early 19th century with Gregor Mendel and his work on heredity of the pea plants. The term "genetics" was coined about 1909 by a British biologist, William Bateson. But even before Mendel and Bateson people were thinking about heredity; theories like pangenesis and homunculus were popular for a time. Darwin proposed Natural Selection in 1859 but was troubled by not knowing a mechanism for his Theory of Evolution. Seven years later Mendel published his findings on pea plant heredity in an obscure Austrian/German journal but it took a long time before the two theories got together. The 20th century was a heady time for genetic research, competition between scientists reached an all time high as everyone searched for the correct molecular structure of DNA. Watson, having lived through those days, knew all those players in a professional, and sometimes personal, way. But when big business and the government got into the fray, things changed. With giant chemical companies investing millions into R&D, and expecting substantial profits in return, the days of free "exchange of knowledge" were over. Some scientists saw big business as an opportunity for unlimited research funding and for personal profit as well. Now the chemical companies, and some scientists, were seeking copyright patients on their discoveries so that anyone wishing to do additional research or even related research would have to pay-up first. Nowadays anything related to "genetics" is, for good or bad, in the public eye. Things like cloning, growth enhancement, GMO's in food and medicine are highly controversial for everyone; health care professionals, consumers, politicians and scientists as well. But no matter where you stand on these issues, you need to be well informed on the science involved and this book is a good starting point to that end. But there's more to genetics that the controversial issues mentioned above and Watson gives the reader an in depth look at the many different facets of this important science. Some of the topics covered are: the origin and evolution of life; medical research on human disease, genetic and otherwise; genetics in forensic law enforcement (like CSI); human evolution, how and when we came "out of Africa" and the Nature vs Nurture debate. Watson's writing is clear and informative, not to mention entertaining, and he gives a good overview of the history and workings of genetic research. You may not agree with everything the good professor has to say but after reading this book you'll have a clearer understanding of the issues. Filled with cutting edge science of the day DNA: The Secret of Life was scientifically up to date in 2003 but, like any science, a lot has changed since then. New findings and theories not withstanding this book is still as relevant and controversial as it was a decade ago. For the layperson reader DNA:SOL is a good jumping off place to newer publications and different authors in molecular biology and genetic research. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has a open, but skeptical, mind with some experience in reading science. I had no technical or formatting problems with this Kindle edition and, as far as I could tell, all the illustrations, charts and photos are included.

Last Ranger
  • Memuro
Great book on the story of the discovery of DNA, from Crick and Watson (the inside word as per Watson) including great background information to the genome project and how DNA is used today and its potential effects on society. Watson may be opinionated but gives a fair and balance overlook of the material. If you are looking for a college textbook description, this is not the book for you, but if you want to see the story behind one of the greatest discoveries in the 20th century (or maybe history), this is a great book.

And thank you to the 3rd party bookseller Aberg books - the book is out of print but was in perfect new condition.
  • Nilabor
I assigned this book to the students of an honors class I recently taught at Lake Superior State University, entitled "DNA: The Secret of Life". Not only was the name of this course the same as the book, but I closely matched the order of topics presented in the class to those found in the book. Because there are only 13 short chapters, this allowed for reading assignments of approximately one chapter per week to fill out a 14 week semester. The book not only covers some of the early history that led to the discovery of DNA as the genetic material, but it also examines the complex issues brought about by having an increased knowledge of the hereditary molecule. In addition to reading the book, our class also watched several episodes of the companion PBS documentary of the same name, thus enhancing the reading experience.

I found Watson's writing style easily approachable and targeted to the advanced high school or college educated reader. The interjection of personal stories and encounters that Watson had with various researchers provided insights that only one of the discoverers of the structure of this molecule could provide. Watson has often been viewed as a polarizing figure, and his writing pulls no punches on certain topics such as the ethical nature of genetic testing, evolution of humans, the race to describe the human genome, and genetically modified organisms (GMOs). While making clear his own views on these topics, he provides enough information that the critical reader is left with a feeling that many of the dilemmas presented by the DNA molecule are complex and have no "right" answer.
  • AnnyMars
Great book. I already had this book but i lost it when i went to the hospital for a chemo round. Didnt finish the book so i had to buy it to add to my library. Great book about how the discovery wemt about and technologies that came with it. You learn alot from this book.
  • Bluddefender
Andrew Berry's writing made this an interesting book. Watson's colleague, Francis Crick, wrote "An Astonishing Hypothesis" himself and it was a painful thing to read.
I can appreciate the difficulty of setting the scope for a subject that can expand in so many directions, but the focus of several chapters still seem less than completely coherent. The result is that those chapters felt out of place... but on the other hand they were interesting enough in themselves.
Oddly, Watson never tried to support his thesis that DNA is the secret of life, rather than one of the products of life.
On a subject as rapidly changing as the study of DNA, individual years make a difference in the content. The book I bought was a later edition than the one the local library had and it was noticeably updated.
  • Kekinos
One of my favorite books in relation to DNA. If you are planning on entering the field of biology, chemistry or biochem this book is a must read.
  • Yggfyn
Watson is a better scientist than writer.
I am 65 years old and have always been fascinated about the roll that DNA plays in our lives. So I'm a newcomer to this field and this is my first stepping stone to learn all can about the secrets that our DNA holds. A very good read.