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Tying Down the Wind: Adventures in the Worst Weather on Earth download ebook

by Eric Pinder

Tying Down the Wind: Adventures in the Worst Weather on Earth download ebook
ISBN:
1585420603
ISBN13:
978-1585420605
Author:
Eric Pinder
Publisher:
Tarcher; First Edition edition (September 4, 2000)
Language:
Pages:
280 pages
ePUB:
1599 kb
Fb2:
1169 kb
Other formats:
lrf rtf lrf mbr
Category:
Environment
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.7

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. On the summit of New Hampshire's Mount Washington, "Home of the World's Worst Weather," snow can fall in the height of summer and hurricane-force winds blow more than 100 days each year.

Tying Down the Wind book. Most of the adventures in this book are from his post on Mount Washington or the place where worst weathers on earth are found

Tying Down the Wind book. Most of the adventures in this book are from his post on Mount Washington or the place where worst weathers on earth are found. This fact stays true until the end of the book where a new record is set. Eric Pender's writing is somewhat poetic, it is Tying down the wind is a aphy kind of book that tells of Eric Pender on his weather post on top of Mount Washington. He is a meteorologist which means that he studys weather, this also means that he knows what he is talking about.

Weather, Science, Nature, Nature, Field Guide Books, Nature/Ecology, Washington, Mount (. Nature, General, Meteorology, General, Climate. New York : Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on May 14, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Where can you find the worst weather on earth? .

Where can you find the worst weather on earth? The surprising answer in Tying Down the Wind is: everywhere! . or car. Drawing on the author’s experiences at the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire’s White Mountains, Tying Down the Wind revisits the devastating Northeast Ice Storm of 1998, takes readers on a snow-blind walk through a Berkshire blizzard, and describes the impact of a 54,000-degree lightning bolt just a few yards away.

Tying Down the Wind: Adventures in the Worst Weather on Earth. Tying Down the Wind takes readers on a voyage of discovery through the atmosphere, a swirling ocean of air that surrounds and sustains life. The journey begins in a sunny New England woodlot and ends atop the polar ice of Antarctica-where we learn, remarkably, that the two extremes are not so different. What triggers changes in the weather? How are tornadoes, thunderstorms, heat waves, and blizzards all related?

Where can you find the worst weather on earth? . The same forces are at work in your own backyard.

Where can you find the worst weather on earth? This book's surprising answer is: everywhere. You don't need to climb Mount Everest or voyage to the icy desert of Antarctica to witness both the beauty and the destructiveness of weather.

Adventures in the Worst Weather on Earth. What triggers changes in the weather? How are tornadoes, thunderstorms, heat waves, and blizzards all related?

Adventures in the Worst Weather on Earth Tying Down the Wind is the sort of book that takes you on a journey

Adventures in the Worst Weather on Earth. Narrated by: Patrick Cullen. Eric Pinder, certified observer at Mount Washington Meteorological Observatory, takes listeners on a voyage of discovery through the atmosphere, a swirling ocean of air that surrounds and sustains life. Tying Down the Wind is the sort of book that takes you on a journey. Similar to Carl Sagan's Cosmos in some respects, it reminds us of the beautiful, lonely and epic forces of nature that are all around us. Published 2000 by Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam in New York. Mount Washington (. There's no description for this book yet.

A fascinating tour of the worst weather can do begins in a sunny New England field and travels as far afield as the Antarctic ice cap in search of tornados, thunderstorms, heat waves, blizzards, and much more. 17,500 first printing.
Reviews:
  • Bradeya
This book was written with no table of contents in mind. It rambles. Seriously rambles. Some of his anecdotes are entertaining but you can literally open this book at any page and begin reading there. There is no beginning, middle, or end. After a while, it just stops. At least two thirds of this book has nothing to do with Mt. Washington but is anecdotes of his weather experiences throughout his life. Some images are quite pretty and poetic but I kept waiting for some structure to the book. Very disorganized and disappointing to me.
  • Gavigamand
Don't be fooled by the title. Pinder's book claims to be "Adventures in the worst weather in the world." Actually, its a description of the weather he personally experiences as an observer on Mt. Washington, which is only interesting to a point. The rest of the weather stories are second hand and poorly told at that. Linder has the annoying habit of repeating himelf and his narrative wanders without any logical progression. But the worst thing I caught was his perpetuating the totally false myth that meteorologist Issac Cline rode up and down the beach on horseback to warn Galveston residents about the approach of the 1900 hurricane. I would have thought that the excellent bestseller "Issac's Storm" had laid that blatantly false story to rest once and for all. For someone whose life is supposed to be weather, this glaring inaccuracy made me question the validity of Pinder's entire book.
Even weather-philes should be wary of this poorly written work. It simply is not what it purports to be. For me, it was a HUGE disappointment.
  • Alien
Eric Pinder subtitles his book "Tying Down The Wind" with "Adventures in the Worst Weather on Earth." But when Pinder writes about such weather, he does so with such a poetic pen that you want to experience it with him. I read much of this book sitting outdoors, enjoying the last days of autumn warmth and dryness I found it difficult to read more than one page at a stretch because Pinder's poetic descriptions of the sky made me stop and look more closely at the sky above me, hoping to see some of what he had described. If I gave you all the passages that stirred my imagination, I'd be infringing on copyright laws.
I rate Tying Down The Wind as one of my three favourite weather books for sheer beauty of the writing. On a few occasions, Pinder's poetic license results in a description falling just off the edge of strict scientific accuracy but in only one case does he go too far for my scientific side.
If you love watching the sky or have weather aficionados or nature nuts on your holiday shopping list, buy this book.
  • Yozshugore
What I like most about this book is how different it is from the many other weather books already out there. Some chapters are adventurous and about hurricanes, blizzards, Antarctica. Others are thoughtful and reflective, explaining how ordinary breezes effect our lives, sometimes in surprising ways. The book's really about observing the sky, and it gets you thinking. The book it reminds me of most is Jan DeBlieu's "Wind." It's informative, but not dull like a reference book. It's entertaining and sometimes philosophical, but isn't just disaster and extremes like all the Into Thin Air clones. It's really more a series of nature essays than a single story, but tied together by a common theme, how weather works.
It's worth noting that the legend of Isaac Cline warning people on the beach before the Galveston hurricane, which an earlier reviewer criticizes at length, is only mentioned in passing here. In fact, it's only one sentence, and I like that. Pinder gives the mandatory nod to this famous, often-rehashed event in weather history, but then moves on to more original observations and descriptions. Besides, I've seen that same legend repeated as fact in many weather texts, including Jack Williams excellent "The Weather Book". So if it's wrong, it's a common error. If that's really "the worst thing" the reviewer found, as he says, I'd say thats actually to the book's credit.
It has some nice, descriptive nature writing. Recommended for any science or natural history bookshelf.
  • inetserfer
Generally I'm really fascinated with tales of adventure, weather, and Mt. Washington. But I really couldn't read this book because of the overbearing prose style. Honestly, I returned it to the library after struggling through a couple of chapters.

Mr. Pinder fancies himself a poet, but what is needed here is a plainspoken storyteller. Lines like "the stars don't speak" are not beautiful or enlightening, just annoying.
  • Leniga
I've climbed Mount Washington several times, so I looked forward to reading this book. The writer seems a likable sort, but sheesh! The book meanders aimlessly, with meteorological information sprinkled about in a hit or miss fashion. an effect increased by the fact that my copy goes from pages 1 to 216, followed by pages 185 to 216, followed by pages 249-280. Tarcher/Putnam should be ashamed.
  • Tehn
I was prepared to really enjoy "Tying Down the Wind". I've been a weather buff for years and was looking forward to scientific information combined with entertaining anecdotes. The information is probably there somewhere but the language is inappropriately flowery and strains self-consciously at similes, analogies and images that add nothing and seriously detract from what he's trying to say. I was slogging through it rather joylessly anyway because reading is my main addiction, but when it came down to talking about a crescent moon setting at daybreak I just gave up. I would like to assume that he knows better and just got lost in his own convolutions but I really don't know. I would not recommend this book to anyone for any reason. It is a waste of time and money.