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Dictionary of Ulster Place-Names (The Place-names of Northern Ireland Series) download ebook

by Patrick McKay

Dictionary of Ulster Place-Names (The Place-names of Northern Ireland Series) download ebook
ISBN:
0853897425
ISBN13:
978-0853897422
Author:
Patrick McKay
Publisher:
Inst of Irish Studies (May 1, 2001)
Language:
Pages:
159 pages
ePUB:
1272 kb
Fb2:
1622 kb
Other formats:
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Category:
Earth Sciences
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

A Dictionary of Ulster Place-Names book. Dictionary of Ulster Place-Names (The Place-names of Northern Ireland Series).

A Dictionary of Ulster Place-Names book. 0853897425 (ISBN13: 9780853897422).

Discover new books on Goodreads Place-Names of Northern Ireland: Volume Eight: County Fermanagh I: Lisnaskea and District, the Parish of Aghalurcher.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Patrick McKay's books. Place-Names of Northern Ireland: Volume Eight: County Fermanagh I: Lisnaskea and District, the Parish of Aghalurcher.

The name of Ireland itself comes from the Irish name Éire, added to the Germanic word land

Included place-names range from the familiar to the obscure, among them 'Beer', 'Findlater', 'Broadbottom', and .

Included place-names range from the familiar to the obscure, among them 'Beer', 'Findlater', 'Broadbottom', and 'Great Snoring'.

Dictionary of Ulster Place-Names, A Paperback – Illustrated, 23 Jul 2007. by. Patrick McKay (Author). He is the author of the volumes on Lisnaskea and the Parish of Aghalurcher (Co. Fermanagh I) and The Baronies of Toome (Co. Antrim I) in the Place-Names of Northern Ireland series.

Included place-names range from the familiar to the obscure, among them 'Beer', 'Findlater', 'Broadbottom', and . The A to Z entries are complemented by a detailed introductory essay discussing the chronology and development of English, Irish, Welsh, and Scottish place-names, as well as an extensive bibliography, maps of Britain showing old and new boundaries, and a glossary of common elements in place-names.

Some place names of the Ulster-Scots settlers. Originally Posted by owenc. Some of those names arent from nessarily ulster scots places. Pomeroy for one is most certainly not ulster scots- for sure!!

Some place names of the Ulster-Scots settlers. Names connected to Ulster and of course some like Hillsborough could apply to other parts of the UK and Ireland. But as you can see there are quite a few in the north and all along the eastern coast. There was too in the Civil War an outfit called the Ulster Guard who fought on the northern side. Pomeroy for one is most certainly not ulster scots- for sure!! A few local ones, derry, londonderry and coleraine. I take it you are referring to the map of place names?

Facilities in a town or city. We usually use the with the names of hotels, cinemas, museums and art galleries: the Marriott, the Louvre, the National Gallery.

Facilities in a town or city. When we are referring to buildings or institutions that don’t include the name of a town or city, we use the: the airport, the University Press, but not when the name of the town or city is included: Gatwick Airport, Cambridge University Press. But there are some exceptions: Have you been on the London Eye? They’ve been on the Eye at least ten times.

Johnston is the most common name in the Irish province of Ulster.

Many of these names were devised during the reign of Brian Boru, the High King of Ireland who fell defending Ireland from the Vikings at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014 AD. 50 Common Irish Surnames. Many of these early Irish surnames began as patronyms to identify a son separately from his father or a grandson from his grandfather. This is why it is very common to see prefixes attached to Irish surnames. Johnston is the most common name in the Irish province of Ulster. Kelly families of Irish origin come primarily from Derry, Galway, Kildare, Leitrim, Leix, Meath, Offaly, Roscommon, and Wicklow.

Book by McKay, Patrick