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Off the Map: The Curious Histories of Place-Names download ebook

by Derek Nelson

Off the Map: The Curious Histories of Place-Names download ebook
ISBN:
1568361742
ISBN13:
978-1568361741
Author:
Derek Nelson
Publisher:
Kodansha Amer Inc (November 1, 1997)
Language:
Pages:
200 pages
ePUB:
1744 kb
Fb2:
1224 kb
Other formats:
lit doc lrf mbr
Category:
Earth Sciences
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

Derek Nelson's book Off the Map is the historical equivalent of a bathroom book.

Derek Nelson's book Off the Map is the historical equivalent of a bathroom book. This is not said to be derogatory. In many ways, that is the charm of the book. I thought it would be a good start for learning about place-names, a subject I had become interested in through my reading of whaling history in Spitsbergen (a place which has a long history of renaming, misplacing, and misspelling place-names). I, unfortunately, did not look through the book before I borrowed it, seeing as how it was the only one of its kind on the shelf. It has no notes, and only cites no more than fifty sources, most (if not all) of which appear to be secondary sources.

summary: places have names. some places have or have had more than one name. sometimes the history of those names is complicated.

This amusing, fact-filled book recharts geography-from Ptolemy to the. summary: places have names. unfortunately, he went on. and on. and on, in a very disjointed, superficial listing of those names and how they were derived. i don't think there were 2 consecutive paragraphs in the book that stuck with any one topic.

I found "Off the Map" to be a breath of fresh air in a discipline that has fallen from grace of late. Mr. Nelson's true love for history and the human frailty behind it is evident throughout the work. I highly recommend this book for the casual reader as well as the academic. A delight! 0. Report. If a book was ever interesting about geography. com User, March 24, 1999. This book has a lot of interesting facts!

I finishing the book "Off the Map - The Curious History of Place-Names" by Derek Nelson. It has lots of interesting stats and a pretty nice scale on the maps. Although the 1968 version was even better - although so hopelessly out of date.

I finishing the book "Off the Map - The Curious History of Place-Names" by Derek Nelson. If the history of maps and how places got their names interest you, you'll probably enjopy this book.

Off the Map: The Curious Histories of Place Names. New York: Kodansha International. Compiled from Original Writers. By the Authors of The Antient Part. S. Richardson et al. 1764. Burpee, Lawrence J. Musson Book Co: Toronto. Atlas manuale, or, A new sett of maps of all the parts of the earth, as well Asia, Africa and America, as Europe.

Find nearly any book by Derek Nelson. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Official and Unofficial Us Navy Air Patches: 1920S to Today. by Derek Nelson, Dave Parsons.

AP Human Geography Book List 2014-2015 1. GEOGRAPHY: ITS NATURE & PERSPECTIVES  How to lie with Maps (Mark Monmonier)  Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of his Time (Dava Sobel, Neil Armstrong (Foreword))  Off the Map: The Curious Histories of Place-Names (Derek Nelson)  On the Map: A Mind-Expanding Exploration of the Way th.

Off the Map; The Curious Histories of Place Names - Derek Nelson. Tender is the Night, the book that caused F Scott Fitzgerald the most artistic heartache, was neither a critical nor a commercial success when it was first published in 1934

Off the Map; The Curious Histories of Place Names - Derek Nelson. Off The Map Map Maker Place Names Geography Map Creator. HC. 8v. 200 pgs. Illustrations, facsimilies, maps. Tender is the Night, the book that caused F Scott Fitzgerald the most artistic heartache, was neither a critical nor a commercial success when it was first published in 1934.

Off the Map: Curious Histories of Place Names" by Derek Nelson (Hardback, 1998). CIVIL WAR CARTOGRAPHY BOOK MAP MAPMAKING nelson. Ohio Portage County Map Nelson Township 1874 Dbl Side Y14. 1927 Airmail Cover Detroit to Nelson Nebraska Postage Due 10c with Map Stamp.

Nelson, Derek (1999). Off the map: the curious histories of place-names. Núñez de las Cuevas, Rodolfo (1991). Historia de la cartografía española. In La cartografia de la Península Ibèrica i la seva extensió al continent americà. Cicle de conferències sobre Història de la Cartografia – 2on curs (Barcelona, 1991). Barcelona : Institut Cartogràfic de Catalunya, 153-223.

Explores the origins of place names and the relationship between geography, cartography, and historical events
Reviews:
  • Bev
A highly readable and moderately interesting tromp through the garden of place-names. It is very generalized, there is a nice bibliography, but no footnotes, and the book is not at all scholarly rigorous in any form or fashion. Sometimes I felt as though the chapters had no connective tissue, and there is very little underlying theory or pattern discernible to the act of place-naming, something people like George R. Stewart try to get at. Thus, this book is an enjoyable, trivia-full read, but not a serious weighty tome (which it never pretends to be).
  • Dodo
A treasure trove for enthusiasts of maps and words. Nelson examines the histories of maps and place names, often demonstrating the turbulence behind the stair and seemingly official surface of maps. While we expect changes in both line and form in old maps, he shows how geographic knowledge and local/international politics continue to redraw maps, and will continue to do so for centuries to come. The only quibble I had with the book, a minor one, was his silence about ancient maps that challenged the cartographic knowledge of the time, such as the Peri Reis map and the extremely accurate portolano charts of the middle ages. All in all, though, an easy and enjoyable introduction to the subject.
  • Zbr
Derek Nelson's book Off the Map is the historical equivalent of a bathroom book. This is not said to be derogatory. In many ways, that is the charm of the book. It is light, easy to read, and filled with many, many facts. There are too many facts coming at the reader to remember them all or to learn them. Instead, the reader will come away with the general knowledge of how important place-names are to a culture and how other cultures will view a place and give it a name of their own. Naming a place to some extent is a control issue and the struggle for control is an ever-changing idea. But even these ideas are too heavy to be sustained in this light book. This book is meant to read quickly and enjoyed throughout. It is cotton candy, sweet to taste but light on substance with a carnival happening just on the outskirts of the reader's eye.
  • Gio
I wondered when I read this book just how accurate it was. It is a huge area of information to cover and the author while writing well does seem to have made some annoying errors. The other reviews cover many of them it seems (a lot I didn't know in fact) The one I picked up is that, when naming the Apollo 13 captain, Nelson called him James Loving (his name is, in fact, James Lovell). Its kind of really basic mistakes like that which bother me. It shouldn't be that hard to get an editor who can pick up on the slip-ups an author makes.
Although Nelson has divided his book up into 11 chapters they do tend to overlap a lot in subject area and matter. It is a fun easy read, one of those books with lots of little snippets of information which makes it easy to pick up at virtually any stage. However in the end I think a book needs to be both fun and accurate.
  • Nayatol
I took a wonderful journey across the modern spectrum of geography with the author's work. I'm sorry a previous reader couldn't enjoy the same trip. This book takes geography out of the realm of academia and puts into the grasp of more readers. Having received an advanced degree in a related area, I know how what may have started as a small idea surely became an all-encompassing labor of love for the author. I appreciated his research and personally thought the editing kept the book on target. Give this one a read if you have the slightest bit of curiosity about how geography just isn't about states and cities, it ties the world together. Imagine my surprise when I found the book I had picked up on a whim was written by a Tidewater neighbor.
  • Nicearad
I borrowed this book from the library yesterday. I thought it would be a good start for learning about place-names, a subject I had become interested in through my reading of whaling history in Spitsbergen (a place which has a long history of renaming, misplacing, and misspelling place-names). I, unfortunately, did not look through the book before I borrowed it, seeing as how it was the only one of its kind on the shelf. It has no notes, and only cites no more than fifty sources, most (if not all) of which appear to be secondary sources. Both were signs I was about to read an unreliable book. I thought it might as well be a start, seeing as how the first book I read on whaling history, Men & Whales by Richard Ellis, I later found to be chalk full of mistakes. I guess it comes with the territory.

I have a very limited knowledge of history outside the early modern era (in particular the first half of the seventeenth century), with my focus being on whaling in Spitsbergen, as mentioned above. So any major mistakes made about modern history I wouldn't have noticed, but halfway through the book I had noticed several, and upon seeing the reviews here I realized I had stumbled upon another Men & Whales. Two mistakes in particular nearly turned me into a vegetable (I tend to get terribly distraught when I see really stupid mistakes on subject matter I know a lot about).

The first, on page 81, states: "The Dutch navigator Willem Barents rediscovered the real Greenland in 1596, and British explorers Martin Frobisher and John Davis visited in the late sixteenth century." First off, how could Barentsz (the proper spelling) have "rediscovered" Greenland if Frobisher's and Davis's voyages had preceded his? And second, he didn't rediscover Greenland! He discovered Spitsbergen, an Arctic island to the east of Greenland, now part of Norway. Only a complete idiot could make such a mistake. The second, on page 109, albeit an easier mistake to make, almost made me put the book down for good: "When the Dutch took control of Spitsbergen (in the Arctic Ocean north of Norway) in the 1640s, they established a town called Smeerenburg (Blubberville) for salting fish and rendering blubber." WHAT?! Smeerenburg was in decline in the 1640s, having been established in 1619 by Danish and Dutch whalers. Anyone with the least bit of knowledge of whaling history would cringe and want to start fighting some dumbass bro once they read that. 1640s?! I'm having trouble processing such an asinine mistake. Smeerenburg was used solely for whaling, not "salting fish"! Salting fish?! What the hell is talking about?! What fish?! Fish?!!

Besides all the errors and writing that haphazardly jumps back and forth between subjects, I did enjoy the book, and only because I found the subject matter to be fascinating. For that I gave it two stars, instead of just one. I finished it in only one morning of reading, amazing for me, considering I usually become distracted or bored with most books that aren't solely on whaling. That being said, seriously don't waste your time with this book. Who knows how many other moronic mistakes the author made I don't care to know about (because just about all history outside the early modern era is really boring to me).