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Field Guide to Mushrooms and Their Relatives download ebook

by H.H. Burdsall,Booth Courtenay

Field Guide to Mushrooms and Their Relatives download ebook
ISBN:
0442231180
ISBN13:
978-0442231187
Author:
H.H. Burdsall,Booth Courtenay
Publisher:
Van Nostrand Reinhold Company; New edition edition (October 1984)
Language:
Pages:
176 pages
ePUB:
1779 kb
Fb2:
1327 kb
Other formats:
lrf txt mobi txt
Category:
Biological Sciences
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

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Home Booth Courtenay A Field Guide to Mushrooms and Their Relatives. About this title: Synopsis: Identifies more than three hundred of the most common mushrooms and fungi, warns of poisonous species, and explains how to collect edible mushrooms. A Field Guide to Mushrooms and Their Relatives. Published by Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1982. Bibliographic Details. Title: A Field Guide to Mushrooms and Their.

Good mushroom book, but incomplete. One person found this helpful.

Personal Name: Courtenay, Booth. Publication, Distribution, et. New York (C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Every mushroom guide feels the need to tell you "this is the cap",etc. As previously indicated, this book is very helpful for those looking to 'treasure hunt' in Michigan/Great Lakes states. This time the author actually taught with clear, friendly wording. The area of expertise for this guide is for the Northeast to the Northwest, Great Lakes, and into Canada. I've found it useful here in the Southeast on a few occasions.

Peck, Charles H. (Charles Horton), 1833-1917. Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. "Reprinted by permission from the Cultivator and country gentleman, of Albany, . MoreLess Show More Show Less.

This handy all-color guide will help you identify the 350 most frequently found species of mushrooms and related . Identifies more than three hundred of the most common mushrooms and fungi, warns of poisonous species, and explains how to collect edible mushrooms.

Identifies more than three hundred of the most common mushrooms and fungi, warns of poisonous species, and explains how to collect edible mushrooms.

Courtenay B, Burdsall HH Jr. 1982. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company. p 144. Gardezi SRA. 1986. Mushroom Flora of Azad Jammu and Kashmir with special reference to Poonch valley. Thesis, MSc (Hons), Univ of Agriculture, Faisalabad. Gardezi SRA, Khan SA. 1991. Observations on Phallus impudicus from Kashmir. Pak J Phytopath 3:64 – 66. Mushroom Flora of Azad Jammu and Kashmir with special reference to Poonch valley Thesis, MSc (Hons). DN 1977 A preliminary agaric flora of East Africa Her Majesty's Stationery Office.

This handy all-color guide will help you identify the 350 most frequently found species of mushrooms and related fungi. Hundreds of mushrooms from such groups as puffballs, jelly fungi, toothed fungi, thelephores, rusts, and club fungi are described and illustrated. Includes a concise explanation of what mushrooms are, when they are found, where to find them, and the role of fungi in the ecosystem. Also includes 120 illustrations of mushroom characteristics that will aid in identifying genus and species, as well as over 400 color photographs. The capsule descriptions include only those characteristics that distinguish one species from another, and there is no repetition of extraneous and confusing characteristics. The author has also included the "ten commandments" for avoiding poisonous mushrooms. In each description, readers will find common and Latin binomial names, cap or body size, appropriate height of stem, spore color, growth habit, gill or tube characteristics, edibility, ecological roles, and much more. A Field Guide to Mushroom and Their Relatives is a valuable volume that will make mushroom hunting productive, satisfying, and safe.
Reviews:
  • Yainai
Don't know why, but I can find and identify the mushrooms of northern Wisconsin with the greatest of ease with this book! Even cross-referencing which is always, ALWAYS necessary to do especially if one is thinking of doing any kind of eating of mushrooms.

I do a lot of research into mycology online, in other books, but I always go back to this. The descriptions are great and accurate. The Species/genus are not accurate now however and need to be updated. Though a lot of books suffer from this phenomenon due to DNA research and surprises from that!

The photography is now 30+ years old, is a little off with some filters being used to depict odd colors they could not Photoshop at the time, is still very accurate. I see these species in their natural habitat and it follows well with what I find.

Things the book should have are more illustrations, though what they have are not bad (cross-sections of different kinds of caps, stipes.) I don't think any book can have too many illustrations depicting how the cap may look removed and looked at face up. Also any other anomalies that just can't be photographed so easily.

Something a lot of mushroom books are missing is the description of smells. Yes, it is a difficult thing to describe, but other books do it, this one should also. Some mushrooms have a very Anaise (licorice) smell and that could throw someone off from a mushroom that might look similar to it. Very useful information!

In summary, for only about 300 described mushrooms, Ms. Courtenay and her colleage Mr. Burdsall describe most of what you will see in the northern woods and neighboring Great Lakes. I would again recommend picking up other books for cross-referencing, but this one, though a smallish book, is packed with a ton of great information.
  • Roru
though its the wrong time of the year to get started, learning about mushrooms is fascinating..especially in western Oregon