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Singing Wilderness download ebook

by Sigurd F Olson

Singing Wilderness download ebook
ISBN:
0394445600
ISBN13:
978-0394445601
Author:
Sigurd F Olson
Publisher:
Knopf (June 27, 1956)
Language:
Pages:
245 pages
ePUB:
1781 kb
Fb2:
1241 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr docx txt
Category:
Biological Sciences
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

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Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Sigurd Ferdinand Olson (April 4, 1899 – January 13, 1982) was an American author, environmentalist, and advocate for the protection of wilderness. For more than thirty years, he served as a wilderness guide in the lakes and forests of the Quetico-Superior country of northern Minnesota and northwestern Ontario. He was known honorifically as the Bourgeois - a term the voyageurs of old used of their trusted leaders.

3 quotes from Sigurd F. Olson: 'Joys come from simple and natural things; mist over meadows, sunlight on. .Wilderness to the people pf America is a spiritual necessity, an antidote to the high pressure of modern life, a means of regaining serenity and equilibrium. Olson: 'Joys come from simple and natural things; mist over meadows, sunlight on leaves, the path of the moon over water. Even rain and wind and stormy clouds bring jo., 'Wilderness to the people pf America is a spiritual necessity, an antidote to the high pressure of modern life, a means of regaining serenity and equilibrium only when one comes to listen, only when one is aware and still, can things be seen and heard. tags: necessity, wilderness.

Sigurd F. Olson was for more than thirty years a wilderness guide in the Quetico-Superior country, and no one knew with the same intimacy the mysteries of the lakes and forests of that magnificent primitive area

Sigurd F. Olson was for more than thirty years a wilderness guide in the Quetico-Superior country, and no one knew with the same intimacy the mysteries of the lakes and forests of that magnificent primitive area. To the many out-of-doorsmen who canoed and portaged with him through this wilderness, he was known honorifically as the Bourgeois - as the voyageurs of old called their trusted leaders through this same region. Mr. Olson was born in Chicago in 1899, and educated at the University of Wisconsin and the University of Illinois

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. to do with the calling of loons, with northern lights, and the great silences of land lying northwest of Lake Superior

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. to do with the calling of loons, with northern lights, and the great silences of land lying northwest of Lake Superior. It is concerned with the simple joys, the timelessness and perspective found in a way of life which is close to the past. I have heard the singing in many places, but I seem to hear it best in the wilderness lake country of the Quetico-Superior, where travel is still by pack and canoe over the ancient trails of the Indians and voyageurs

to do with the calling of loons, with northern lights, and the great silences of land lying northwest of Lake Superior. Olson (1899-1982) was one of the greatest environmentalists of the twentieth century

Sigurd F. Olson (1899-1982) was one of the greatest environmentalists of the twentieth century. A conservation activist and popular writer, Olson introduced a generation of readers to the importance of wilderness.

Sigurd Olson (1899-1982) was acknowledged during his lifetime as a leader of the American environmental movement .

Sigurd Olson (1899-1982) was acknowledged during his lifetime as a leader of the American environmental movement, an emblematic figure for a generation of activists. A Wilderness Within is the award-winning biography of this writer, teacher, and activist who was a harbinger of the raising of America's ecological consciousness. 5 people like this topic. Olson's Wilderness days. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. B on February 24, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

to do with the calling of loons, with northern lights, and the great silences of land lying northwest of Lake Superior. It is concerned with the simple joys, the timelessness and perspective found in a way of life which is close to the past. I have heard the singing in many places, but I seem to hear it best in the wilderness lake country of the Quetico-Superior, where travel is still by pack and canoe over the ancient trails of the Indians and voyageurs." Thus the author sets the theme and tone of this enthralling book of discovery about one of the few great primitive areas in our country which have withstood the pressures of civilization.Acute natural perceptivity and a profound knowledge of the relationships to be found in nature combine here in vivid evocations of the sights, the sounds, the vast stillnesses, and the events of the wilderness as the seasons succeed each other. But Mr. Olson is not content merely to "describe; he probes for meanings that will lead the reader to a different and more revealing way of looking at the out-of-doors and to a deeper sense of its eternal values. In each of the thirty-four chapters of The Singing Wilderness he has sought to capture an essential quality of our magnificent lake and forest heritage. He shows us what can be read from the rocks of the great Canadian Shield; he offers a delightful essay on the virtues of pine knots as fuel; he writes of the ways of a canoe, of flashing trout in the pools of the Isabella, of tamarack bogs, caribou moss, the flight of wild geese, timber wolves, and the birds of the ski trails. And much more, with something to satisfy every taste for wilderness experience.Superbly illustrated with 38 black-and-white drawings by Francis Lee Jaques, The Singing Wilderness is a book that no lover of nature will want to be without. To anyone who contemplates a vacation in the lake country of northern Minnesota and adjoining Canada, it is the perfect vade mecum.
Reviews:
  • Pedar
A paean to the North Woods. This book is another of Sigurd Olson's wonderful songs of praise for the North Woods, especially the Minnesota area. It read well, and for those of us who have been then, brings back wonderful memories.

This is a series of short essays on the North Woods, well worth having in the library of an individual who had ever enjoyed the Northern Forest such as the Boundary Waters. To read this book is to slip back into that wonderful time spent in the North Woods.
  • MisTereO
Sig Olson talks the talk (wilderness) and walks the walk! His prose is crisp and lively, conveying to the reader who has ever camped in a pup tent or heard the haunting call of the deep allure of wild spaces for alert twenti-first century human beings. The start pen-and-ink drawings by Francis Lee Jaques complement Sig's lucid narrative. As a high school student I fell in love with Rule 13 in Strunk and White's 1913 "The Elements of Style": "Vigorous writing is concise. A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts. This requires not that the writer make all his sentences short, or that he avoid all detail and treat his subjects only in outline, but that every word tell." Sig must have been entranced by the magic of 'vigorous writing' as well. He is "the great Bourgeois" (voyageur term).
  • Balhala
Noted conservationist Sigurd F. Olson wrote this collection of essays about his years canoeing, snowshoeing, skiing and fishing the Wilderness areas of Superior National Forest and the Quetico of Canada.

The essays are organized according to the four seasons. Olson has an almost metaphysical relationship with the animals that live in the wilderness: red squirrels, loons, otters, even field mice are fellow travelers.

Olson canoes and portages scores of miles to listen to the loons sing on Lac La Croix. He searches hundreds of lakes, looking for the perfect wilderness area, unspoiled by civilization. And he finds it! Saganaga, "a symbol of the primitive, perfect and untouched." Later, he hears that a road has come to Saganaga and he ventures back to see what's been done to it. It seems the same until he rounds a bend and is confronted with a modern lodge. He's conflicted; he wants human companionship but he doesn't want to lose his "singing wilderness."

In another essay, he tells of "flying in" to one of the lakes, rather than spending days canoeing and portaging to get there. He feels disoriented and can't really appreciate the experience. He hasn't put in enough effort; he doesn't deserve it. And he never does this again.

Olson is a sentimental, nostalgic man. He tells of catching trout for his grandmother, whom he credits with instilling a love of nature. While fishing on the Manitou, he is confronted with an eighty-year-old trout fisherman who's come to his favorite fishing spot for one last time.

Olson also limns essays that show the brutality of nature. In "The Storm" we see white-throated sparrows, Killdeers, purple finches, chickadees, and robins returning to the wilderness area after a long and brutal winter. Olson is marveling at their music until snow begins the fall and the temperature plummets. Thousands of confused birds freeze to death.

Admittedly, there is some clunky writing in the SINGING WILDERNESS; one gets the impression that Olson is writing from memory in a lot of instances. Also, at times he doesn't tell you where he is: he refers to the "lake" as if we should know which one of the thousands in the Superior/Quetico wilderness he's referring to. There's also a dearth of people. Often, he refers to "we" but the person or persons he's with are invisible.

That said, I think everyone would benefit from reading these essays. I couldn't help but wonder how many people know this place exists. These days the area is called the Boundary Water Canoe Area Wilderness. No motor boats allowed; no ATVs allowed! Everyone should see it at least once in his/her lifetime.
  • Daigrel
Mr. Olson pursued a passion and became one of the best in his field. His love for the wilderness was so great he wanted to share it with the world. Simply put, he makes me want to go outdoors! While you gain facts and history, it is the relationship between people,land and animals told almost romantically that endeared me to this book. You get lost and almost transported to the very sites he describes. What a gift he left behind.
  • DABY
Sigurd Olson is one of the best at historical and environmental writing. He not only writes about the history of the North but has also traveled the river routes of the early fur traders. Very interesting and well written. He is no doubt one of my favorite wilderness writers.
  • Gamba
This book is for everyone. If you love the outdoors this author is for you. It relaxes you can almost see his love by the way he writes.
  • VariesWent
Originally published in 1956, this classic still speaks to nature lovers today, and it deserves to share the same shelf with Thoreau, Muir, and Beston. Olson's essays convey the spirit and sense of place in what is now known as the Boundary Waters Canoe Area -- Superior National Forest in Minnesota and Quetico Provincial Park in Ontario. North country life is special, and Olson obviously loved living there. He writes with delight of seeing Northern Lights, portaging canoes, cross country skiing, hearing the echoes of loons calling, and witnessing the occasional mouse tobogganing off a tent roof. Though the chapters are organized by seasons and begin with Spring, it is the essence of cold and snow and winter that carries the reader through the book. Best to be read by a warm fireplace with a light snow falling outside and a mug of hot chocolate nearby.
Olson is Muir and Berry rolled into Minnesota.