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At-Risk: Stories download ebook

by Nancy Zafris,Amina Gautier

At-Risk: Stories download ebook
ISBN:
0820338885
ISBN13:
978-0820338880
Author:
Nancy Zafris,Amina Gautier
Publisher:
University of Georgia Press; 1st edition (September 15, 2011)
Language:
Pages:
160 pages
ePUB:
1234 kb
Fb2:
1460 kb
Other formats:
lit docx lrf lrf
Category:
Short Stories & Anthologies
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In these always engaging stories, Amina Gautier reminds us that behind the disturbing headlines are vibrant young people whose lives matter immeasurably.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In Amina Gautier’s Brooklyn, some kids make it and some kids don’t, but not in simple ways or for stereotypical reasons. Gautier’s stories explore the lives of young African Americans who might all be classified as at-risk. Gautier employs unflinching honesty to capture those lives, and she does so with clarity, dignity and genuine insight. At-Risk" will break your heart even as it leaves you full of hope.

At-Risk, by Amina Gautier, is not an easy book to read. There are no sugar-coated stories and fantastic endings for these children. It’s heartbreaking and heart wrenching to read, but you can understand their sullenness, resentment, and arrogance

At-Risk, by Amina Gautier, is not an easy book to read. It’s heartbreaking and heart wrenching to read, but you can understand their sullenness, resentment, and arrogance. They have to become, hardened, tough and feisty, living in a world where crime is rampant and might claim them at any time. Some of these children’s parents’ parents were not equipped to love and nurture their children. How do you expect und At-Risk, by Amina Gautier, is not an easy book to read.

Читайте At-Risk (автор: Amina Gautier) бесплатно 30 дней в течении пробного периода

Читайте At-Risk (автор: Amina Gautier) бесплатно 30 дней в течении пробного периода. Читайте книги и аудиокниги без ограничений в веб-браузере или на устройствах iPad, iPhone и Android. Gautiers stories explore the lives of young African Americans who might all be classified as at-risk, yet who encounter different opportunities and dangers in their particular neighborhoods and schools and who see life through the lens of different family experiences. Gautiers focus is on quiet daily moments, even in extraordinary lives; her characters do not stand as emblems of a subculture but live and breathe as people.

Amina Gautier is an American writer and academic. She is the author of three short story collections, many individual stories, as well as works of literary criticism. In 2014, she lived in both Chicago and in Miami. Gautier was born and raised in New York. After participating in Prep for Prep, she attended the Nightingale Bamford School before graduating from Northfield Mount Hermon. She then went to Stanford, where she earned bachelor's and master's degrees in English literature

Read At-Risk, by Amina Gautier online on Bookmate – In Amina Gautier’s Brooklyn, some kids make it and some kids don’t, but not in simple ways or for stereotypical reasons. Gautier’s stories explore.

Read At-Risk, by Amina Gautier online on Bookmate – In Amina Gautier’s Brooklyn, some kids make it and some kids don’t, but not in simple ways or for stereotypical reasons. Gautier’s stories explore the lives of young African Americans who might all be classified as at-risk, yet who encounter different opportunities and dangers in their particular neighborhoods and schools and who see life through the lens of different family experiences.

In Amina Gautier's Brooklyn, some kids make it and some kids don't, but t in simple ways or for stereotypical reasons. Gautier's stories explore the lives of young African Americans who might all be classified as at-risk, yet who encounter different opportunities and dangers in their particular neighborhoods and schools and who see life through the lens of different family experiences. Gautier's focus is on quiet daily moments, even in extraordinary lives; her characters do t stand as emblems of a subculture but live and breathe as people

In Amina Gautier's Brooklyn, some kids make it and some kids don't, but not in simple ways or for stereotypical reasons.

In Amina Gautier's Brooklyn, some kids make it and some kids don't, but not in simple ways or for stereotypical reasons. Gautier's stories explore the lives of young African Americans who might all be classified as "at-risk," yet who encounter different opportunities and dangers in their particular neighborhoods and schools and who see life through the lens of different family experiences. Gautier's focus is on quiet daily moments, even in extraordinary lives; her characters do not stand as emblems of a subculture but live and breathe as people.

Read online books written by Amina Gautier in our e-reader absolutely for free. Books by Amina Gautier: At-Risk. Author of At-Risk at ReadAnyBook.

1990 Nancy Zafris for The People I Know. 1991 Robert H. Abel for Ghost Troops. 2010 Linda L. Grover for The Dance Boots. 2011 Amina Gautier for At-Risk. 2011 Melinda Moustakis for Bear Down, Bear North: Alaska Stories. Levy for Love, In Theory

1990 Nancy Zafris for The People I Know. 1991 T. M. McNally for Low flying Aircraft. 1992 Alfred DePew for The Melancholy of Departure. 1993 Alyce Miller for The Nature of Longing. 1993 Dianne Nelson for A Brief History of Male Nudes in America. 1995 C. Mayo for Sky Over El Nido. 1996 Ha Jin for Under the Red Flag. Levy for Love, In Theory. 2012 Hugh Sheehy for The Invisibles.

In Amina Gautier’s Brooklyn, some kids make it and some kids don’t, but not in simple ways or for stereotypical reasons. Gautier’s stories explore the lives of young African Americans who might all be classified as “at-risk,” yet who encounter different opportunities and dangers in their particular neighborhoods and schools and who see life through the lens of different family experiences.

Gautier’s focus is on quiet daily moments, even in extraordinary lives; her characters do not stand as emblems of a subculture but live and breathe as people. In “The Ease of Living,” the young teen Jason is sent down south to spend the summer with his grandfather after witnessing the double murder of his two best friends, and he is not happy about it. A season of sneaking into as many movies as possible on one ticket or dunking girls at the pool promises to turn into a summer of shower chairs and the smell of Ben-Gay in the unimaginably backwoods town of Tallahassee. In “Pan Is Dead,” two half-siblings watch as the heroin-addicted father of the older one works his way back into their mother’s life; in “Dance for Me,” a girl on scholarship at a posh Manhattan school teaches white girls to dance in the bathroom in order to be invited to a party.

As teenagers in complicated circumstances, each of Gautier’s characters is pushed in many directions. To succeed may entail unforgiveable compro­mises, and to follow their desires may lead to catastrophe. Yet within these stories they exist and can be seen as they are, in the moment of choosing.

Reviews:
  • Zainian
What a lovely book! Each story is wonderfully different and totally unique. The writing is beautiful, simple and rhythmic all at the same time. I like the way Gautier frames the collection by beginning and ending with the same characters, but how all of the stories in the middle are different, as if all of the other characters can live between the two possibilities. Although the stories all are serious, plenty of them have small humorous touches. Each story ends in a way that leaves me wanting more. These stories are all unique and beautifully written. I think it's really hard to write from the point of view of a child without making the kids seem too adult or too sentimental and cheesy. This writer goes inside the heads of her characters and makes them all seem real. The stories focus on underprivileged or "at-risk" kids, but the book is not gloomy or depressing. It is real. After all, we are living in a world where people build their prisons based on the number of kids who can't read by third grade. Gautier is tackling serious issues that affect yesterday and today's youth. In addition to struggling to make a place for themselves, making friends, and finding ways to fit in, many kids really do have to deal with bullying, growing up in single families, dealing with the deaths of their friends, drug culture, teenage pregnancy, underage sex, and the pressures of growing up too fast. What I really appreciate about these stories is that they are all subtle and so well-written. Nothing is blatant and in your face. These stories don't overdo it and create stereotypical or pitiful characters. None of the kids come off as charity cases. It seems like the writer is saying that even though people are products of their environment, the kids also have to make their own choices and decisions. I hope she writes more books.
  • Monn
At-Risk, by Amina Gautier, is not an easy book to read. There are no sugar-coated stories and fantastic endings for these children.
It’s heartbreaking and heart wrenching to read, but you can understand their sullenness, resentment, and arrogance. They have to become, hardened, tough and feisty, living in a world where crime is rampant and might claim them at any time.
Some of these children’s parents’ parents were not equipped to love and nurture their children. How do you expect under-aged mothers, who become emancipated, the moment they’re pregnant, to follow? How do you expect boys and girls to have any self-worth if they feel they are not worthy?
The chief factors involved are: discrimination, lack of education, lack of a viable income, crime, and poor housing conditions.
One of the ways to eradicate this is an education not only academically, but parenting and social skills.
Strong mentors are required. Those who knew what it was to live on the ‘mean streets’ in the inner city. Those who are steadfast, and willing to become entrenched in the lives of boys and girls who desperately need them. Those who refuse to quit are crucial.
Ms. Gautier, I compliment you for writing this book. It gives a person clarity and insight into the road less traveled for so many.
  • IGOT
This is an amazing and illuminating collection of short stories about people on the verge of falling through the cracks. Some parents here struggle diligently to keep their children safe, forgoing their own happiness in order to achieve a better future for their children. Other parents struggle with addiction, give up in despair, leave, or get arrested. We meet gifted kids, favored kids, bad influence kids, neglected kids, teen moms, kids so starving for attention they throw themselves at strangers, or go to any lengths for acceptance. In the projects, or away on scholarships, the risks are many and terrifying.
  • Qane
Amina Gautier does an amazing job of telling the everyday stories of "At-Risk" teens living in the urban city. Her characters are complex, gritty, and sometimes even vulgar. Each story sheds light on the irony of the term "At Risk" and also the accuracy of it at times.

As a high school English teacher, I love using the book to break up the monotony. I allow the students to read it aloud for the class and they love it because of the real language. It also makes them feel cool because they get to sometimes curse (only one story) in class and not get in trouble. It also makes them think about their situations a little more.

Great book!
  • Dilkree
Amina Gautier doesn't flinch as she tells the stories of the struggles of these city kids, but neither is she out to manipulate our emotions with melodramatic situations. She simply tells it how it is, in clean prose that is narrative- and character-driven. She connects with what is most human in all her characters, from a small bully at a girls' school to a teen mother to a gifted boy whose mother devalues his intelligence. Each story is utterly engaging and sincere.
  • Vut
A wonderful book of perceptive stories about the lives of young urban African-Americans. Gautier pays particular attention to the estrangement created by the vast difference in educational opportunity between those selected for access to special enrichment and private schools and those judged by the capricious sorting mechanisms of private philanthropy as deserving of much less. By telling stories from both sides of this divide, Gautier gives us something much rarer than boilerplate language about the "hopes and dreams" of the young can convey. In this book, the drama of a teenage mother learning to bond with her newborn baby is just as urgent as the struggles of her sister for academic success and middle-class security. A young girl sitting alone in detention ponders geology and forties films alongside her plight as an ignored student in an overcrowded public elementary school. Suffice to say, I can't stop thinking about the struggles, confusions and epiphanies of Gautier's characters. With prose so elegant and characters so memorable, it is hard to choose a favorite story, but I particularly admired "Some Other Kind of Happiness," "Held," and the devastating bookends created by "The Ease of Living" and "Yearn."