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The Snow Watcher: Poems download ebook

by Chase Twichell

The Snow Watcher: Poems download ebook
ISBN:
0865380937
ISBN13:
978-0865380936
Author:
Chase Twichell
Publisher:
Ontario Review Press; First Edition edition (January 17, 1998)
Language:
Pages:
80 pages
ePUB:
1829 kb
Fb2:
1319 kb
Other formats:
lrf txt azw mobi
Category:
Poetry
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

Reading the poems in The Snow Watcher is like breathing cold ai. .they are full of sharp observation.

Reading the poems in The Snow Watcher is like breathing cold ai. Where Gary Snyder might be loosely rhapsodic or Lucien Stryk tautly ruminative, Twitchell is after a middle ground, and the result is often a compelling human tension. Forays into childhood memories acknowledge autobiographical discomfort: "It was autumn, the adult word for fall. In school we saw a film called Reproduction.

The Snow Watcher is a sequence of poems that asks a single obsession question: what is the self? The book is a radical re-envisioning of what makes us human rather than animal, human rather than insentient. The poems delve into parts of childhood more comfortably forgotten, and into the ancient stillness of the monastery (Twichell is a student of Zen Buddhism).

The Snow Watcher book. Chase Twichell has opened another path in this superb book. I can't think of a better poet conveying the actual experience of entering practice. Perhaps because Twichell is first a poet-the subject matter here is particular, but the sheer talent is what lets her write about Zen overtly in a way that is not ponderous, didactic, or imitative of either the Beats or the classical Buddhist poets of Japan, Korea, and China.

Chase Twichell, hayatı, şiirleri, eserleri, hakkinda yazilanlar. Poems Of Chase Twichell (23). Dangerous Playgrounds.

Poem Hunter all poems of by Chase Twichell poems. Best Poem of Chase Twichell. Don't tell me we're not like plants, sending out a shoot when we need to, or spikes, poisonous oils, or flowers. 23 poems of Chase Twichell.

Many of Twichell's poems are heavily influenced by her years as a Zen Buddhist student of John Daido Loori at Zen Mountain Monastery, and her poetry in the book The Snow Watcher shows i.

Many of Twichell's poems are heavily influenced by her years as a Zen Buddhist student of John Daido Loori at Zen Mountain Monastery, and her poetry in the book The Snow Watcher shows it. She attended the Foote School in New Haven. In the Fall 2003 Tricycle magazine interview with Chase, she says, "Zazen and poetry are both studies of the mind. Perdido (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1991). Horses Where the Answers Should Have Been (Copper Canyon Press, 2010). I find the internal pressure exerted by emotion and by a koan to be similar in surprising and unpredictable ways. Zen is a wonderful sieve through which to pour a poem.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on August 26, 2014. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

it's a simple book with simple poems. the poems aren't mine. hunger by something // chase twitchell.

Winner of the Balcones Poetry Prize. Often brash, always vivid, smart, and lyrical, pointing toward essential things-this is a marvelous and rich body of work. Chase Twichell has that rare combination of technical fastidiousness and imaginative recklessness that marks for us poets who intend fully to test their powers, and remind us of ours.

"Reading the poems in The Snow Watcher is like breathing cold air.... they are full of sharp observation, both of the world and herself, unsentimental poems with a sinewy intellectual toughness"—The Washington Post

The Snow Watcher is a sequence of poems that asks a single obsession question: what is the self? The book is a radical re-envisioning of what makes us human rather than animal, human rather than insentient. The poems delve into parts of childhood more comfortably forgotten, and into the ancient stillness of the monastery (Twichell is a student of Zen Buddhism). In both realms the known self dissolves, or is intentionally dismantled, and what is left is something impossible to name, though its startling voice can be heard in the austere, near-empty rooms of these poems.
Reviews:
  • Olelifan
Spare but haunting poems reflective of Buddhist practice and an alert, probing mind. Some of the poems are subtly disturbing, hinting of dark times in the author's past, but others are hopeful and insightful. Twichell manages to convey a poetic persona that is both probing and playful. Overall, a crisp and bracing read.
  • Saimath
Saw one of the poems in this book on a subway in Manhattan, looked up the author and knew I had to get this book! The poems are wonderful and contemplative.
  • BoberMod
I can see why Chase Twichell has a small but devout following. For my part, there are few other poems that resonate with me as much as hers do.
  • Slowly writer
Actually,that's what happened to my copy. I was going through an ugly divorce. I am a Buddhist. A friend suggested reading this book through the Hard Time. I took it to a pub, had a beer or two too many, left without the book. Realised it was left two minutes later, went back, Too late! Gone. I figure whoever nabbed it was also in need of the clarity, the crystal limning, the in-your-face reality. The best book of poetry I've read in a decade. I think I'll order another copy.
  • Uriel
I love the forthrightness of these poems. Chase Twichell's THE SNOW WATCHER is a book of some of the most convincing American zen poems I've ever seen. They are American in the sense that they are constantly subverting themselves, constantly questioning themselves, but at the same time they are beautiful and evocative and searching moments of clarity. There is a steady quietude that manages to peel back the layers of both the natural world and the self in a way that is both fresh and deeply historical.