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The Book of Irish Verse: An Anthology of Irish Poetry from the Sixth Century to the Present download ebook

by John Montague

The Book of Irish Verse: An Anthology of Irish Poetry from the Sixth Century to the Present download ebook
ISBN:
0884861929
ISBN13:
978-0884861928
Author:
John Montague
Publisher:
Bristol Park Books; 1st Bristol Pk Bks Ed Pub 1998 edition (February 1, 1998)
Language:
Pages:
400 pages
ePUB:
1557 kb
Fb2:
1814 kb
Other formats:
docx doc lrf lit
Category:
Poetry
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.5

This anthology contains Irish verse ranging from the 6th century to contemporary poets. Arranged chronologically, the poems take the reader on a journey through Irish history and Irish sensibilities.

This anthology contains Irish verse ranging from the 6th century to contemporary poets. There is great contrast and variety contained in this collection, work from and for every mood and interest. I had not previously appreciated the number and range of poets that Ireland has produced, nor had I experienced the verbal skill of her people to such an extent; this is a marvelous collectio This anthology contains Irish verse ranging from the 6th century to contemporary poets.

This anthology, selected and introduced by John Montague, begins with ancient Irish poetry and takes the reader mid-way through the 20th century. We begin with "The First Invasion of Ireland," from The Book of Invasions, and move on to some of the beautiful chants and incantations of Amergin, the chief bard of the Milesians: "I am a stag: of seven tines/I am a flood: across a plain/ I am a wind: on a deep lake/I am a tear: the Sun lets fall. These ancient selections provide some of the best pagan Celtic reading I've come across

John Montague was born in Brooklyn, New York on February 28, 1929. He was educated at University College Dublin and Yale University.

John Montague was born in Brooklyn, New York on February 28, 1929. He was a poet, writer, and translator. He helped found Claddagh Records, which publishes traditional artists and leading literary figures in Ireland. He died on December 10, 2016. Библиографические данные. The Book of Irish Verse: An Anthology of Irish Poetry from the Sixth Century to the Present.

This is the first major anthology of Irish American poetry. This anthology brings together exemplary poetry of the "populist period" of Irish American verse (in particular the work of poets such as John Boyle O'Reilly), with the work of those Irish Americans who have made an indelible imprint on American poetry: Robinson Jeffers, Marianne Moore, Louise Bogan, John Berryman, Thomas McGrath, John Montague, Robert Creeley, Frank O'Hara, Ted Berrigan, Charles Olson, Galway Kinnell, X. J. Kennedy, and Alan Dugan, among others.

A BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER, by Joan Didion. An intelligent, detailed history of the Fabian Society. FALCONER, by John Cheever. Anthology of Irish poetry from the sixth century to ours. THE FABIANS, by Norman and Jeanne MacKenzie. A man in prison, his emergence; a novel of almost liturgical intensity and beauty. GATES OF EDEN, by Morris Dickstein.

John Montague (born February 28, 1929) is an American-born Irish poet, short story writer, and academic. as The Book of Irish Verse: An anthology of Irish poetry from the sixth century to the present. New York: Macmillan, 1974. He is one of the best-known Irish contemporary poets. John Montague was born in Brooklyn, New York City  . Bitter Harvest: An anthology of contemporary Irish verse. New York: Scribner, 1989

Poetry (18 items) list by Chris.

Poetry (18 items) list by Chris. Published 11 years, 11 months ago. View all The Book of Irish Verse: An Anthology of Irish Poetry from the Sixth Century to the Present lists. Manufacturer: Bristol Park Books Release date: 1 February 1998 ISBN-10 : 0884861929 ISBN-13: 9780884861928. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

The Penguin poetry anthologies, published by Penguin Books, have at times played the role of a 'third force' in British poetry, less literary than those from Faber and Faber, and less academic than those from Oxford University Press.

It achieves what might seem nearly impossible, a balanced view of Irish poetry from the earliest times to the .

It achieves what might seem nearly impossible, a balanced view of Irish poetry from the earliest times to the present. It does a great job of sorting out the unsurpassable from the merely passable. It's undaunted by the magnitude.

Ships from the UK. Former Library books. Poetry Books in Irish 1950-1999 Publication Year. Irish Travel Hardback Non-Fiction Books in Irish. Poetry Hardback Fiction Books in Irish. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Poetry Paperback Books in Irish. Additional site navigation.

Works by Ireland's finest, from the sixth-century bards, through Swift and Goldsmith, to Yeats, Graves, Beckett, and today's young poets, provide a full survey of Irish poetry
Reviews:
  • Zyangup
This book was exactly what I was after to give me a nice range of poems from a variety of authors. The book itself is in great condition and I received it promptly after my order. Many thanks
  • Danrad
Of all the Irish Anthologies, and there are many, this one compiled by John Montagye is the best. Dan Maguire
  • Sironynyr
This anthology, selected and introduced by John Montague, begins with ancient Irish poetry and takes the reader mid-way through the 20th century. We begin with "The First Invasion of Ireland," from The Book of Invasions, and move on to some of the beautiful chants and incantations of Amergin, the chief bard of the Milesians: "I am a stag: of seven tines/I am a flood: across a plain/ I am a wind: on a deep lake/I am a tear: the Sun lets fall. . ." These ancient selections provide some of the best pagan Celtic reading I've come across.

Montague then guides us through some writings of the early monastics, such as "Marban, A Hermit Speaks": "Young of all things, /bring faith to me,/ guard my door:/ the rough, unloved/ wild dogs, tall deer,/ quiet does." These writings give one the sense of a people so intimately interwoven into natural patterns and rhythms that there is no feeling of separation from Nature.

All the early selections of course are translated from the Gaelic, and we do not get into the poems written in English until later. According to Montague's excellent introduction, most poets composed in their native tongue until the nineteenth century, at which point most began writing in English. "Irish literature in English is in the uneasy position that the larger part of its past lies in another language," writes Montague. Thus we read in Montague's own poem "A Grafted Tongue," "Dumb,/ Bloodied, the severed/ head now chokes to/ speak another tongue."

But even before the use of Gaelic was waning, Irish culture was being systematically crushed by the British occupiers. The war against Ireland's native culture began before Elizabethan times. Thus, in the later poets Montague finds "a racial sensibility striving to be reborn; is it strange that it comes through with a mournful sound, like a medium's wail?": "I heard the dogs howl in the moonlight night;/ I went to the window to see the sight;/ All the Dead that ever I knew/ Going one by one and two by two. . ." (William Allingham (1824-1889).

Even in the later poets of Christianized Ireland, who write in English, the pagan past is never quite obscured. Patrick MacDonogh (1902-1961) writes in "Now the Holy Lamp of Love," "Cradling hands are all too small/And your hair is drenched with dew;/ Love though strong can build no wall/ From the hungry fox for you." And Denis Devlin (1908-1959) writes in "Ascension" of a visionary experience of blinding light. He begins with "Aengus, the god of Love, my shoulders brushed/With birds, you could say lark or thrush or thieves. . ./" but moves on to "For it was God's Son foreign to our moor:/ When I looked out the window, all was white,/And what's beloved in the heart was sure,. . ."

In so many of these poems there is beauty, grace, and felicity, juxtaposed with suffering and sometimes bitterness. Contemporary poet Paul Muldoon (born 1951) writes in "Dancers At the Moy" of horses who tore "at briars and whins,/ Ate the flesh of each other/Like people in famine. . .The local people gathered/Up the white skeletons./Horses buried for years/Under the foundations/Give their earthen floors/The ease of trampolines." Here, suffering and loss become the foundation for continued life.

A complex national character manifests through these poems. Reading them, we see the English language being borne into new poetic realms by a nation for whom English is "a grafted tongue." A wonderful book.