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The Crow Eaters download ebook

by Bapsi Sidhwa

The Crow Eaters download ebook
ISBN:
0312177178
ISBN13:
978-0312177171
Author:
Bapsi Sidhwa
Publisher:
St Martins Pr; First American Edition edition (February 1, 1982)
Language:
Pages:
283 pages
ePUB:
1759 kb
Fb2:
1444 kb
Other formats:
mobi docx azw txt
Category:
Literary
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.4

Sidhwa-herself a Parsi from Lahore-sets up a very convincing fictional narration of Freddy, his family and how he lives and makes others live their lives.

Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Sidhwa-herself a Parsi from Lahore-sets up a very convincing fictional narration of Freddy, his family and how he lives and makes others live their lives. By the way, Crow eaters is the slang for noisy talkative people, if you were wondering. The story line flows effortlessly as Bapsi spans about half a century covering the lives of two generations of Parsees in Lahore. The glimpses of Lahore in the early 20th century provide an interesting backdrop to the novel.

Feroza Ginwalla, a pampered, protected 16-year-old Pakistani girl, is sent to America by her parents, who are alarmed by the fundamentalism overtaking Pakistan - and their daughter. Hoping that a few months with her uncle, an MIT grad student, will soften the girl’s rigid thinking, they get more than they bargained for: Feroza, enthralled by American culture and her new freedom, insists on staying

Bapsi Sidhwa was born in Karachi and brought up in Lahore. In addition to The Crow Eaters, her first published novel, she has published two other critically acclaimed novels The Pakistani Bride and Ice-Candy-Man.

Bapsi Sidhwa was born in Karachi and brought up in Lahore. An active social worker she represented Pakistan at the 1975 Asian Women’s Congress. Bapsi Sidhwa is married, with three children, and lives in Lahore. This book is dedicated. Tehmina & Peshotan Bhandara.

The Crow Eaters (USA) Paperback: 267 pages Publisher: Daunt Books Date: April .

Bapsi Sidhwa’s study of some archetypal characters of her community-the Parsees-deserves more than praise both as a sociological and as a literary document. The Parsees have always been flamboyantly prominent in public life: what goes on behind this façade has been, for most of us, as remote and mysterious as the underworld. Bapsi Sidhwa has opened for us all the doors and all the windows of this world’s innermost recesses.

The Crow Eaters by Bapsi Sidhwa. 71 people like this topic. Want to like this page?

The Crow Eaters by Bapsi Sidhwa.

Contemporary Fiction. 12% off. The Crow Eaters. By (author) Bapsi Sidhwa, By (author) Fatima Bhutto. Free delivery worldwide.

Policemen held the crowd back with a fence of lathi-sticks. The edge of the clearing undulated with every pressure from the back. The edge of the clearing undulated with every pressure from the back ulls and bodies of those nearest the rim. Inside the clearing firemen rushed about with wet cloths wrapped round their faces. Two or three groups supported the hose that poured thin, sharp jets of water into the furnace. Helmeted men in the broker’s office and toy-shop hacked at wood-work and flung out inflammable debris.

The author is a born storyteller. – New Statesman ‘Sidhwa writes with an exuberance and geniality which make The Crow Eaters illuminating and memorable. Fiction Short Stories Classics. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The crow eaters: a novel. As his ox-drawn cart labors north, Faredoon Jungelwalla has no destination in mind.

Faredoon (Freddie) Junglewalla is either the jewel of the Parsi community or a murdering scoundrel. The crow eaters: a novel. He just has faith, as all Parsees have, that he will know it when he sees it. And in Lahore his faith is rewarded. Пользовательский отзыв - Jagruti - Goodreads.

Book Source: Digital Library of India Item 2015. author: Sidhwa, Bapsi d. ate. te: 2014/07/25 d. dentifier. copyno: 1 d. scannerno: SC-02 d. escription. scanningcentre: North Eastern.

A humorous look into the world of India's Parsis chronicles the rise to success of Faredoon--known as Freddy--Junglewalla as he attempts to assassinate his insidious mother-in-law, prevent his son from becoming a holy beggar, and cope with a variety of traumas
Reviews:
  • Armin
A beautiful book. I ordered another book by the author (Cracking India aka The Ice Candy Man) before I was even half way through with this one. Prose, story and enlightnment about Parsee culture alike are all superb. Highly recommended.
  • Cezel
Bapsi Sidhwa’s obvious affection for the Parsee community sits at the heart of the novel yet in no way prevents her from poking fun at its all too human foibles. The humour is irreverent but irresistible.

Humor aside, it is the emotional ones that will grip your mind & heart. I still remember the scene of Soli’s funeral where the touching humanity of his otherwise improbably insufferable father overwhelmed me.

Sidhwa--herself a Parsi from Lahore--sets up a very convincing fictional narration of “Freddy,” his family and how he lives and makes others live their lives. By the way, Crow eaters is the slang for noisy talkative people, if you were wondering.

The story line flows effortlessly as Bapsi spans about half a century covering the lives of two generations of Parsees in Lahore . The glimpses of Lahore in the early 20th century provide an interesting backdrop to the novel. Crow Eaters is not only entertaining and funny but also provides a good understanding of the history, religious practices and ethics of the Parsees in the subcontinent, a small community that has survived by being adaptive , adopting the dress, food and language of its host nation, yet preserving its identity by maintaining age old customs of fire worship and death rites.
  • virus
Funny, irrepressible, beautifully written but like almost every book from the region, Indian or Pakistani , it is also sad. I loved it.
  • Barinirm
Lively satire, with a rollicking portrait of the mother-in-law from hell.
  • Hiylchis
I was interested in the book because I spent four years in Lahore and have very fond memories of it.
This book didn't give me much in the way of incite into Lahore in pre-partition days, but it was interesting.
The beginning of the book is very amusing - about the trip by bullock cart to Lahore but it gets a little fanciful after than and not so believable.
An easy read and entertaining.
  • Elastic Skunk
Very good read.
  • Wire
Bapsi Sidhwa takes the readers back to the magical past of India where in theory there is tolerance and acceptance of the magnanimous diversity. She creates a nostalgia for readers unfamiliar with Parsi culture feel familiar with their amazing past.
She is honest, funny and tells a good story. I have enjoyed all of her books. Her books should be part of Indian history lessons.