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Eureka download ebook

by Stuart Levine,Susan F. Levine,Edgar Allan Poe

Eureka download ebook
ISBN:
025202849X
ISBN13:
978-0252028496
Author:
Stuart Levine,Susan F. Levine,Edgar Allan Poe
Publisher:
University of Illinois Press; y First printing edition (September 8, 2004)
Language:
Pages:
232 pages
ePUB:
1822 kb
Fb2:
1245 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr azw mbr
Category:
History & Criticism
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

Eureka (1848) is a lengthy non-fiction work by American author Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1849) which he subtitled "A Prose Poem", though it has also been subtitled as "An Essay on the Material and Spiritual Universe".

Eureka (1848) is a lengthy non-fiction work by American author Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1849) which he subtitled "A Prose Poem", though it has also been subtitled as "An Essay on the Material and Spiritual Universe". Adapted from a lecture he had presented, Eureka describes Poe's intuitive conception of the nature of the universe with no antecedent scientific work done to reach his conclusions. He also discusses man's relationship with God, whom he compares to an author.

His many books include Edgar Poe: Seer and Craftsman.

Originally published in 1848, Eureka is Poe's book on how the universe was formed, how it functions, and what its future might be. Poe provides a physical, scientific explanation for the interconnectedness of all things-an idea at the heart of much of nineteenth-century romanticism and American Transcendentalism in particular.

Eureka: A Prose Poem Lyrics. WITH VERY PROFOUND RESPECT, This Work is Dedicated. Eureka: an essay on the material and spiritual universe

Eureka: A Prose Poem Lyrics. Eureka: an essay on the material and spiritual universe. It is with humility really unassumed-it is with a sentiment even of awe-that I pen the opening sentence of this work: for of all conceivable subjects I approach the reader with the most solemn-the most comprehensive-the most difficult-the most august.

Eureka: A Prose Poem - 1984 - Edgar Allan Poe: Poetry and Tales, ed. Patrick F. Quinn (New York: Library of America), pp. 1257-1359. Eureka - 2004 - Stuart and Susan F. Levine, ed. Chicago: University of Illinois Press. Eureka - Part IV - January 1860. Eureka - 1864 - Paris: Michel Lévy frères (issued about November 25, 1863). Eureka - 2007 - Audio book (unabridged), read by Chris Aruffo (part of a 5-CD set). Bibliography: Benton, Richard . Cross-lights on Poe;’s Eureka, in Eureka: A Prose Poem by Edgar Allan Poe, ed.

Levine and Levine are reliable scholars who have compiled an excellent little book containing arguably the most . I've always had a liking for Edgar Allan Poe, with his tales of horror, mystery and suspense, done in the atmospheric prose of a master writer.

Levine and Levine are reliable scholars who have compiled an excellent little book containing arguably the most notable of Poe's short stories. Since I live close enough, I've even made some trips to his gravesite, a place that is always surrounded by a sense of sadness.

of the 1830s and 1840s, discussing Shelley, Carlyle, Byron, Emerson, and Hawthorne, as well as the railroad, photography, and the telegraph.

Edgar Allan Poe, Stuart Levine and Susan F. Levine. From the publisher: Originally published in 1848, Eureka is Poe’s book on how the universe was formed, how it functions, and what its future might be.

Poe's work is very uneven, sometimes reaching great literary heights, at other times striking the honest reader as meaningless, pathetic, or simply wrong-headed. This is not surprising, considering the personal turmoil that characterized so much of Poe's short life

Poe's work is very uneven, sometimes reaching great literary heights, at other times striking the honest reader as meaningless, pathetic, or simply wrong-headed. This is not surprising, considering the personal turmoil that characterized so much of Poe's short life. Poe was extreme in his literary views and practices; balance and equilibrium were not literary values that he prized.

Scholarly annotated edition of Poe's Eureka; Originally published in 1848, Edgar Allen Poe's Eureka stands as the single most important expression of the philosophic views on which all of his literary endeavors depend. Put in the context of Melville's Moby Dick, Thoreau's Walden, Whitman's Leaves of Grass, and the music of Liszt and Wagner, it is an explosive, startlingly unconventional creation of the High Romantic era. what its future might be, this user-friendly critical edition is also the first to put Eureka in proper context. It includes Poe's proposed emendations to the text and sources and explains the setting in which it was produced, tying Eureka to world trends in philosophy and fast-breaking news in astronomy. To compile this definitive text, the Levines traveled to the special collections departments of various libraries to examine Poe's own notes on the various drafts. They also consulted with Poe scholars, classicists, and historians of astronomy. The result of their meticulous scholarship is a deep, broad, and thoroughly useful volume, essential for Poe scholars and valuable to anyone interested in American literature or the roots of science fiction.
Reviews:
  • Kinashand
An annotated edition of Eureka is something I would have liked to do myself some day. I'm not giving this 5 stars because it's an all time classic work of literature; I'm giving it 5 stars because it's one of the most interesting works that Poe produced, and it's one of the most remarkable works of literature of 19th century American literature. Note, I didn't saying it's one of the "greatest" works. Generally, I pride myself on writing objective reviews, separating my estimation of an item's quality from how much I like it personally. In this case, however, I know the greatness of the work is not equal to how much I like it personally. And that's okay once in a while I suppose.

This work is exceedingly strange. I'm not even really sure what it is exactly. It's not strictly an essay...nor a poem, nor a philosophical treatise, nor a work of fiction. It defies explanation, really. It's a stew of satire, science fiction, mathematics, poetry, philosophy, science, literary theory, and...well, I'm sure I'm leaving out some things. Whatever it is, however, it's absolutely extraordinary. I've read it many times and have concluded it's the key to understanding the whole of Poe's oeuvre. That's why I give it 5 stars in a subjective review. But if you need some objective reason to give it a try, consider what one literary critic has said about the work: Poe came ever-so-close to reconciling the antithetical disciplines of poetry and philosophy, something few in the history of literature have managed.
  • Windworker
Excellent review of thoughts in the 19th century intellectual community related to origins of the universe. Before reading this edition I had the incorrect perspective from peers that Poe anticipated many of the unsolved issues still being worked through in today's astrophysics community (big bang, black holes, multiverse with varying elements of physics, non- locality in quantum physics, etc). Poe adopts the topics from many sources which are referenced and adds his own conclusions. Great edition of this classic! Like much of Poe's work a great deal would be missed without the careful annotations. Each paragraph is numbered with annotations for many but these are collected following the text rather than at the bottom of the pages or parallel to the text. The result was a very slow but fascinating read. I love Poe, love physics and the history of science. Biggest challenge now is where to file this book in my personal collection where each of these areas continue to grow. It's not the Tell Tale Heart but you need to read it if you want to know who Poe was.
  • AnnyMars
The rest of the reviews on this page are about Poe's Eureka, a brilliant piece of literature that threatens to solve the riddle of life, the universe, and everything.

I just want readers to see that this is not another ordinary reprint of Eureka, which has lost copyright and so is freely available on the internet, along with all of Poe's work. Why buy a $20 book when you can get it for free? I'll tell you why.

This book edited by Stuart and Susan Levine goes by Poe's proposed edits that were not published. Each page has 51 pages of footnotes after the text, explanations of what Poe was saying in relation to the understanding of his day, referring to his tremendous store of ancient and current books he had read in latin, greek, french, italian, german, spanish, and english. This edition is for someone who really wants to understand where Poe was coming from when he wrote Eureka.

Be careful buying the used copies on this page, as most or all of them (and all the rest of the reviews on this page so far) are not the edition of Eureka edited by Stuart and Susan Levine. I usually buy used, but this time I bought new.
  • Bundis
Ok, I was shocked to see a science book written by Edgar Allan Poe. He himself calls it a poem...ok, Poe, poem.

I'm into astronomy so I thought, why not? Well, here's the thing. It strikes me as a serious work---a sort of explanation of how the Universe was seen in 1848. I found the reading to be a grind from time to time. I wondered why I was reading "outdated" science. I wondered why I was reading Poe's outdated science. Sometimes I was bored with it.

Then again...sometimes I was really gripped by the thoughts and the expressions...man, this guy can write. And I was continually amazed at his knowledge...not only just for the time. And then I felt a connection. A connection I felt for those who've grappled with the same issues in the past but with less information than we have today. I'm learning too and am part of that chain of learning...hard to explain. The ideas, some even wrong ideas, are stimulating. THe thoughts stimulate.

In short, yes, I'm glad I read it. I'm glad I bought a hard copy to add to my library. And something will pull me back to it for reference from time to time----I know that already!
  • Umrdana
Outstanding. Recommend.
  • Vudomuro
This shows the real Edgar Allan Poe trying to make sense of a loss by searching for the most plausible human answer.