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Righteous Republic: The Political Foundations of Modern India download ebook

by Ananya Vajpeyi

Righteous Republic: The Political Foundations of Modern India download ebook
ISBN:
0674048954
ISBN13:
978-0674048959
Author:
Ananya Vajpeyi
Publisher:
Harvard University Press; 1st Edition edition (October 31, 2012)
Language:
Pages:
368 pages
ePUB:
1844 kb
Fb2:
1357 kb
Other formats:
docx mbr mobi rtf
Category:
History & Criticism
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

Ananya Vajpeyi's book Righteous Republic is a path breaking work which analyses the intellectual journey of. .Either way it is likely that a very new set of "indic" and or "organic" ideas will form the political foundations of new leaders

Ananya Vajpeyi's book Righteous Republic is a path breaking work which analyses the intellectual journey of the men that made modern India. Their public lives - where they struggled to gain freedom for India - were based on deeply held convictions/values which they arrived at by rigorous self discipline and a tireless personal quest for excellence. Either way it is likely that a very new set of "indic" and or "organic" ideas will form the political foundations of new leaders. The quest for self, of course, is entirely upto us as individuals (citizens and leaders).

the foundation of the new nation-states of India and Pakistan. firmament against which we can see the very horizon of the political. But As I grew up and became engaged in activities which promised. even as he is engaged in his political activities, the freedom fighter becomes.

The foundations of pluralism in modern Western liberal political thought. There has been little dialogue between academic communities studying ancient India and scholars working on violence in modern India. Part of the reason has been suspicion concerning the ideological foundations of Indology amongst social scientists and modern historians. Normalization of Hindutva politics and Saffron modernity in India.

Righteous Republic book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Righteous Republic: The Political Foundations of Modern India as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Analysing crises of the self, which it is argued stem from a […

Download Righteous Republic: The Political Foundations of Modern India.

Download Righteous Republic: The Political Foundations of Modern India.

Analysing crises of the self, which it is argued stem from a crisis of tradition during late colonialism, Righteous Republic retells the movement for self-rule through a history of ideas. Podcast: Download ().

Ananya Vajpeyi’s book works with a singular idea of an Indic tradition that she perceives as being in a crisis in the confrontation with colonialism. Citation: Dilip Menon.

Some extracts from Ananya Vajpeyi, Righteous Republic: The Political Foundations of.

Some extracts from Ananya Vajpeyi, Righteous Republic: The Political Foundations of Modern India 2012, pp1-48. Introduction Swaraj, the Self's Sovereignty. This book follows five of India's founders through their engagements with a range of classical texts whose primary description may or may not conform to our prior expectations regarding the genre of political thought. My sources, in other words, range across poetry, painting, scripture, epigraphy, architecture, and sculpture; across texts that are as likely to be expressive and.

What India's founders derived from Western political traditions as they struggled to free their country from colonial rule is widely understood. Less well-known is how India's own rich knowledge traditions of two and a half thousand years influenced these men as they set about constructing a nation in the wake of the Raj. In Righteous Republic, Ananya Vajpeyi furnishes this missing account, a ground-breaking assessment of modern Indian political thought.

Taking five of the most important founding figures-Mohandas Gandhi, Rabindranath Tagore, Abanindranath Tagore, Jawaharlal Nehru, and B. R. Ambedkar-Vajpeyi looks at how each of them turned to classical texts in order to fashion an original sense of Indian selfhood. The diverse sources in which these leaders and thinkers immersed themselves included Buddhist literature, the Bhagavad Gita, Sanskrit poetry, the edicts of Emperor Ashoka, and the artistic and architectural achievements of the Mughal Empire. India's founders went to these sources not to recuperate old philosophical frameworks but to invent new ones. In Righteous Republic, a portrait emerges of a group of innovative, synthetic, and cosmopolitan thinkers who succeeded in braiding together two Indian knowledge traditions, the one political and concerned with social questions, the other religious and oriented toward transcendence.

Within their vast intellectual, aesthetic, and moral inheritance, the founders searched for different aspects of the self that would allow India to come into its own as a modern nation-state. The new republic they envisaged would embody both India's struggle for sovereignty and its quest for the self.

Reviews:
  • Gralsa
Ananya Vajpeyi's Righteous Republic is in many ways a unique book, in particular since it is a very valuable read for India experts, but could (and should) also be read by those who want to understand more about India. Deep but fully accessible for the educated non-specialist reader, the book is classifiable within the genre "history of ideas", but it actually supplies us with a set of most valuable intellectual tools to make sense of the deep problems, but also the often inexplicable vitality, of contemporary Indian society. What emerges from this fascinating book is the constant tension between intellectual and cultural polarities that make up the essence of "being Indian", mainly those that are historically embodied in Asoka (the Buddhist ruler inspired by compassion and ethics) and Kautilya (the realist, Machiavelli-like political thinker) - a tension that emerges with great clarity from the intellectual, moral and political profiles of the Founding Fathers of the Indian Republic (Gandhi, Nehru, Tagore, Ambedkar) and that can be spelled out in a series of diads: violence/non-violence; tradition/modernity; hedonism/ascetism; democracy/inequality.
One question tends to surface throughout the book: To which extent does present-day India reflect (or betray) the legacy of the Founders? Or perhaps, in other words: to which extent those creative, vital tensions have become unsolvable contradictions? To which extent has legacy become mere rhetoric?
We hope that Ananya Vajpeyi's brilliant scholarship and remarkable writing skills will help give us, in another book (a sort of follow-up to the present volume) answers to those questions.
Roberto Toscano (Italian ambassador to India 2008-2010)
  • Samulkis
The author needed some tightening by an editor, especially in the Gandhi and Tagore sections. Descriptions were repeated endlessly about Swaraj and poetry. Nehru was far more interesting and direct as she quoted from the PM's writings.
  • Nkeiy
Beautifully written and thought-provoking. Vajpeyi peels off years of clichéd rhetoric and focuses on the inner workings of the self, be it Gandhi, Nehru, the Tagores, or Ambedkar. Original and compelling. Must read for any one working on modern India, particularly for those interested in the so-called founding fathers of the nation.
  • Hulore
A fascinating angle on "swaraj" (self-rule) in India, focusing on five key thinkers who made independence possible. More specifically, Vajpeyi looks at how these thinkers (Gandhi, Nehru, Ambedkar, and the Tagores) though about the self ("swa") in swaraj. Formally, this is intellectual history, but it demonstrates tremendous learning, since Vajpeyi needs to be conversant here not only with twentieth-century western and Indian thought but also with ancient sources such as the Bhagavad Gita, devotional poetry, and the edicts of Ashoka. And, amazingly, she IS. I learned a LOT from the book. Great reading for anyone interested in India, or in how democracy in any country drinks from ancient wells in political philosophy and poetry alike.
  • Perongafa
Ananya Vajpeyi's book Righteous Republic is a path breaking work which analyses the intellectual journey of the men that made modern India.

Their public lives - where they struggled to gain freedom for India - were based on deeply held convictions/values which they arrived at by rigorous self discipline and a tireless personal quest for excellence. In that sense, it was a struggle for an original framework of "self", before or at least in parallel with any other "national project". While Gandhi turned to the Gita to develop this framework of `self'; Nehru turned to Ashoka, Ambedkar to Buddha, Tagore to Kalidas. It is clear that they were all original thinkers, with deep intellectual ideas that often conflicted with those of their peers. Tagore, for example, having gone through his own intellectual journey, rejected the idea of a "nation" - and Vajpeyi thus makes us ask, How we came to call him a "National" Poet? The author shows how these founding fathers arrived to their idea of "self" after having scanned the myths and historicity of India. Indeed, none of them, were debating/obsessing/wrestling, with western concepts or binaries (democracy vs communism) while they may have eventually chosen between those models as they moved from the concept of "imagining" India to "running" it. In fact, Vajpeyi shows that they obsessed with very "Indic" ideas of "swaraj", "viraha", samvega, dharma, artha, and dukha. Gandhi, Nehru, the Tagores and Ambedkar - all of them struggled with these ideas which originated in India's documented, and or "unknowable history".

Vajpeyi's is a historical work - and this intellectual map of the mind of the founding fathers is history its best. It therefore, has it's intrinsic value. However, it becomes path breaking when it forces us to think of the present and the future, and of the self and of the nation in the same vein. Indeed, in analysing the minds of the founding fathers and mapping how they applied it to their lives and times, Vajpeyi forces us to think about ourselves, this country, and the current genre of leadership. What is particularly exciting Vajpeyi's style and voice is that it offers something for all of us here, struggling with our plural and exhaustingly confusing Indian identify at a point in history where dreams and aspirations of millions collide and converge in the hands of those who are at the high table of Indian plutocracy - economic and political, but whom "we" (multiple "I's) elected. She makes us quetion for example: Why does an Anna Hazare led Gandhian movement lose momentum? Is it, perhaps, because those present in large numbers in protests such as these have not yet truly redeemed their `self / "swa" to demand consistent change? They have not yet asked, for example, what is the quantum of sacrifice we need to make as individuals to demand and hope for the quantum of change we'd like to see to see in our leadership. In reference, to our lives and times then, do we wonder, for example, what intellectual concepts drive Mr Ratan Tata? What is his framework which then allows him to understand the need to do business with Narender Modi , a man apparently believing, like himself, in market driven economics but not open to committing himself to value of secularism? And if `Economics' and `Secularism' are indeed "Western ideas", then we wonder what "indic" ideas they may have in common? Why do we see Mamta Banerjee, at an IPL cricket event in Calcutta, AND at the head of protests against an Indian born industrialist promising jobs in an economically desperate state? Indeed, we must ask what are the intellectual concepts that drive her leadership style? Are they "Indic" (dukha), are they "western" (communism), or are they just "political" (power and survival)? Furthermore, we ought to ask if in their private and public lives - do they remain true to themselves, and their own frameworks, whatever it may be. In that sense, then, are we ok with the current leadership wearing a Khadi Kurta and Rolex watch, or are we not? And would be ok with either or, as times have changed.

In the end, the reader is left wanting more - and hoping that Ms Vajpeyi writes a sequel in which she maps the minds of modern day leadership. She will of course have to write this one with the understanding that Independence is not the goal anymore, but good governance is. Righteous or not, we already have a Republic. And whether conviction of compromise makes a sense of self - is also a valid question to be asked in India's federal and fractured polity. Either way it is likely that a very new set of "indic" and or "organic" ideas will form the political foundations of new leaders. The quest for self, of course, is entirely upto us as individuals (citizens and leaders). And on that front, Vajpeyi's tragically hammers in the point that nothing great or substantial was achieved without conviction, sacrifice, and self -discipline.

Vinati Dev, New Delhi, 2013