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This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color download ebook

by Cherrie Moraga

This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color download ebook
ISBN:
0913175188
ISBN13:
978-0913175187
Author:
Cherrie Moraga
Publisher:
Kitchen Table/Women of Color Pr (March 1, 1984)
Language:
Pages:
261 pages
ePUB:
1406 kb
Fb2:
1728 kb
Other formats:
lrf doc lit mobi
Category:
History & Criticism
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

First published in 1981 by Persephone Press.

First published in 1981 by Persephone Press.

Also by Cherrie Moraga Cuentos: Stories by Latinas, ed. with Alma Gomez and M a r i a n a R o m o - C a r m o n a. Kitchen Table: Women of. .Such an anthology is in high demands these days. A book by radical women of color

Also by Cherrie Moraga Cuentos: Stories by Latinas, ed. Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press, 1983. Loving in the War Years: Lo Que Nunca Paso Por Sus Labios. S o u t h End Press, 1983. A book by radical women of color. The Left needs it, with its shaky and shabby record of commitment to women, period. Oh, yes, it can claim its attention to "color" issues, embodied in the male.

For the women in this book, I will lay my body down for that vision. This Bridge Called My Back.

We are a family who first only knew each other in our dreams, who have come together on these pages to make faith a reality and to bring all of our selves to bear down hard on that reality. For the women in this book, I will lay my body down for that vision.

This anthology by radical, feminist and mostly lesbian Women of Colour has the aura of a revolutionary moment. Although this book came This Bridge Called My Back is, unquestionably, one of the most influential books of my life

This anthology by radical, feminist and mostly lesbian Women of Colour has the aura of a revolutionary moment. I loved the range of styles, especially the wonderful poems and prose poems, and generally the directness that gave it the feeling of a drama, the feeling of being in a room with the contributors. Although this book came This Bridge Called My Back is, unquestionably, one of the most influential books of my life. It would be an impossible task to attempt to quantify what I ned from this book. That being said: This Bridge Called My Back is an anthology of essays, theory,fiction, poetry, and the fusion of all four written by radical women of color.

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Get books you want A classic work by award-winning author Cherríe Moraga, The Last Generation is an electric mix of prose and poetry that continues conversations started in the beloved books This Bridge Called M.

This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color. A classic work by award-winning author Cherríe Moraga, The Last Generation is an electric mix of prose and poetry that continues conversations started in the beloved books This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color and Loving in the W. Loving in the War Years. by Cherríe L. Moraga.

This Bridge Called My Back dispels all doubt about the power of a single text to radically transform the terrain of our theory and practice. Twenty years after its publication, we can now see how it helped to untether the production of knowledge from its disciplinary anchors and not only in the field of women s studies. A poet, playwright, and cultural activist, Cherríe Moraga is Artist in Residence in the Department of Theater and Performance Studies and in the Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity Program at Stanford University.

This Bridge Called My Bac. as served as a significant rallying call for women of color for a generation, and this .

A much-cited text, its influence has been visible and broad both in academia and among activists.

Cherrie L. Moraga and many contributors to This Bridge Called My Back feted by hundreds . Moraga and many contributors to This Bridge Called My Back feted by hundreds, overflowing the auditorium at USF. So many young people reading along, as this student did with Nellie Wong. Very grateful to authors and organizers. One of the first books to put women of color front-and-center in the feminist sphere, This Bridge Called My Back, brought together women writers from all kinds of backgrounds: Chicanas, African-Americans, Asian women, indigenous women and others. First published in 1981, the anthology quickly became an important work in the feminist movement.

A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines It had been so long since I was instantly enamored with a book. I was drawn in by this story’s rawness and engaged by a narrator who does not want to be a hero

A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. I was drawn in by this story’s rawness and engaged by a narrator who does not want to be a hero. I finished this in two days, and it’ll stay with me for a while. 3 ответов 0 ретвитов 14 отметок Нравится. 2. This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color ed. by Cherríe Moraga & Gloria Anzaldúa I saw so much of myself in these writings from powerful women. They echoed my experiences as a woman of color from family gatherings to outright racism. Took my breath away!pic.

Reviews:
  • Jugore
Gloria Anzaldúa (1942-2004) also wrote/edited Borderlands / La Frontera: The New Mestiza,this bridge we call home: radical visions for transformation,Interviews/Entrevistas,Making Face, Making Soul/Haciendo Caras: Creative and Critical Perspectives by Feminists of Color,The Reader, etc. Cherríe Lawrence Moraga is part of the faculty at Stanford University in the Department of Drama and Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity; she has also written books such as A Xicana Codex of Changing Consciousness: Writings, 2000-2010,Heroes and Saints and Other Plays,The Hungry Woman: The Hungry Woman: A Mexican Medea and Heart of the Earth: A Popul Vuh Story,Waiting in the Wings: Portrait of a Queer Motherhood,Loving in the War Years,Watsonville/Circle in the Dirt: Watsonville: Some Place Not Here and Circle in the Dirt: El Pueblo de East Palo Alto, etc.

Cherríe Moraga wrote in the Preface to this 1981 (2nd edition 1983) book, “This book is written for all the women in it and all whose lives our lives will touch. We are a family who first only knew each other in our dreams, who have come together on these pages to make faith a reality and to bring all of our selves to bear down hard on that reality. It is about physical and psychic struggle. It is about intimacy, a desire for life between all of us, not settling for less than freedom even in the most private aspects of our lives. A total vision. For the women in this book, I will lay my body down for that vision. ‘This Bridge Called My Back.’” (Pg. xix)

The titles of some of the writings in this anthology are: “Invisibility is an Unnatural Disaster: Reflections of an Asian American Woman”; “Gee, You Don’t Seem Like an Indian from the Reservation”; “I Don’t Understand Those Who have Turned Away from Me”; “The Pathology of Racism: A Conversation with Third World Wimmin”; Audre Lorde’s “An Open Letter to Mary Daly”; “Lesbianism: An Act of Resistance”; “I Paid Very Hard for My Immigrant Ignorance”; “who told you anybody wants to hear from you? you ain’t nothing but a black woman!”; :Chicana’s Feminist Literature: A Re-Vision through Malintzin/or Malintzin: Putting Flesh Back on the Object”; “A Black Feminist Statement”; Pat Parker’s “Revolution: It’s Not Neat or Pretty or Quick”; etc.

To give you a brief “taste” of the riches contained in this volume, here are a few quotations: “‘Alienation’ and ‘assimilation are two common words used to describe contemporary Indian people. I’ve come to despise those two words because what leads to ‘alienation’ and ‘assimilation’ should not be so concisely defined. And I generally distrust words that are used to define Native Americans and Brown People.” (Pg. 48) [Barbara Cameron]

“Often, I am asked questions like, ‘Is Argentina in Europe or Asia?’ or ‘Don’t you speak Portuguese down there?’ How can one feel guilt about screwing over someone/some country she knows nothing about?” (Pg. 80) [Judit Moschkovich]

“Although black and white feminists can sometimes work together for a common goal with warmth and support, and even love and respect each other occasionally, underneath there is still another message. That is that white feminists, like white boys and black boys, are threatened by us. Moreover, white feminists have a serious problem with truth and ‘accountability’ about how/why they perceive black wimmin as they do.” (Pg. 86) [Doris Davenport]

Audre Lorde said in her open letter to Mary Daly, “Mary, do you ever really read the work of black women? Did you ever read my words, or did you merely finger through them for quotations which you thought might valuably support an already-conceived idea concerning some old and distorted connection between us? This is not a theoretical question. To me this feels like another instance of the knowledge, crone-logy and work of women of color being ghettoized by a white woman dealing only out of a patriarchal western-european frame of reference…” (Pg. 95-96) She adds, “If white american feminist theory need not deal with the differences between us, and the resulting difference in aspects of our oppressions, then what do you do with the fact that the women who clean your houses and tend your children while you attend conferences on feminist theory are, for the most part, poor and third world women? What is the theory behind racist feminism?” (Pg. 100)

“What white lesbians have against lesbians of color is that they accuse us of being ‘male identified’ because we are concerned with issues that affect our whole race. They express anger at us for not seeing the light. That is another aspect of how they carry on their racism. They are so narrow and adamant about that that they dismiss lesbians of color and women of color who aren’t lesbians because we have some concern about what happens to the men of our race. And it’s not like we like their sexism or even want to sleep with them. You can certainly be concerned as we are living here this summer in Boston when one Black man after another ends up dead.” (Pg. 121-122) [Barbara Smith]

“Not all Third World women are ‘women of color’---If by this concept we mean exclusively ‘non-white.’ … And not all women of color are really Third World---if this term is only used in reference to underdeveloped or developing societies… Clearly then it would be difficult to justify referring to Japanese women, who are women of color, as Third World women. Yet, if we extend the concept of Third World to include internally ‘colonized’ racial and ethnic minority groups in this country, so many different kinds of groups could be conceivably included, that the crucial issue of social and institutional racism and its historical tie to slavery in the U.S. could get diluted, lost in the shuffle. The same thing would likely happen if we extended the meaning of ‘women of color’ to include all those women in this country who are victims of prejudice and discrimination … but who nevertheless hold racial privileges and may even be racists.” (Pg. 151) [Mirtha Quintanales]

“I am a wind-swayed bridge, a crossroads inhabited by whirlwinds. Gloria, the facilitator, Gloria the mediator, straddling the walls between abysses. ‘Your allegiance is to La Raza, the Chicano movement,’ say the members of my race. ‘Your allegiance is to the Third World,’ say my Black and Asian friends. ‘Your allegiance is to your gender, to women,’ say the feminists. Then there’s my allegiance to the Gay movement, to the socialist revolution, to the New Age, to magic and the occult. And there’s my affinity to literature, to the world of the artist. What am I? A third world lesbian feminist with Marxist and mystic leanings. They would chop me up into little fragments and tag each piece with a label.” (Pg. 205) [Gloria Anzaldúa]

“If the passage of the ERA means that I am going to become an equal participant in the exploitation of the world; that I am going to bear arms against other Third World people who are righting to reclaim what is rightfully theirs---then I say F___ the ERA.” (Pg. 240) [Pat Parker]

This collection (there is a newer edition, by the way) is absolutely indispensable for feminists, womanists, Third World women and women of color, the LGBT community, or just about anyone else who is interested in progressive ideas.
  • Thetalune
Gloria Anzaldúa (1942-2004) also wrote/edited Borderlands / La Frontera: The New Mestiza,this bridge we call home: radical visions for transformation,Interviews/Entrevistas,Making Face, Making Soul/Haciendo Caras: Creative and Critical Perspectives by Feminists of Color,The Reader, etc. Cherríe Lawrence Moraga is part of the faculty at Stanford University in the Department of Drama and Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity; she has also written books such as A Xicana Codex of Changing Consciousness: Writings, 2000-2010,Heroes and Saints and Other Plays,The Hungry Woman: The Hungry Woman: A Mexican Medea and Heart of the Earth: A Popul Vuh Story,Waiting in the Wings: Portrait of a Queer Motherhood,Loving in the War Years,Watsonville/Circle in the Dirt: Watsonville: Some Place Not Here and Circle in the Dirt: El Pueblo de East Palo Alto, etc.

Cherríe Moraga wrote in the Preface to this 1981 (2nd edition 1983) book, “This book is written for all the women in it and all whose lives our lives will touch. We are a family who first only knew each other in our dreams, who have come together on these pages to make faith a reality and to bring all of our selves to bear down hard on that reality. It is about physical and psychic struggle. It is about intimacy, a desire for life between all of us, not settling for less than freedom even in the most private aspects of our lives. A total vision. For the women in this book, I will lay my body down for that vision. ‘This Bridge Called My Back.’” (Pg. xix)

The titles of some of the writings in this anthology are: “Invisibility is an Unnatural Disaster: Reflections of an Asian American Woman”; “Gee, You Don’t Seem Like an Indian from the Reservation”; “I Don’t Understand Those Who have Turned Away from Me”; “The Pathology of Racism: A Conversation with Third World Wimmin”; Audre Lorde’s “An Open Letter to Mary Daly”; “Lesbianism: An Act of Resistance”; “I Paid Very Hard for My Immigrant Ignorance”; “who told you anybody wants to hear from you? you ain’t nothing but a black woman!”; :Chicana’s Feminist Literature: A Re-Vision through Malintzin/or Malintzin: Putting Flesh Back on the Object”; “A Black Feminist Statement”; Pat Parker’s “Revolution: It’s Not Neat or Pretty or Quick”; etc.

To give you a brief “taste” of the riches contained in this volume, here are a few quotations: “‘Alienation’ and ‘assimilation are two common words used to describe contemporary Indian people. I’ve come to despise those two words because what leads to ‘alienation’ and ‘assimilation’ should not be so concisely defined. And I generally distrust words that are used to define Native Americans and Brown People.” (Pg. 48) [Barbara Cameron]

“Often, I am asked questions like, ‘Is Argentina in Europe or Asia?’ or ‘Don’t you speak Portuguese down there?’ How can one feel guilt about screwing over someone/some country she knows nothing about?” (Pg. 80) [Judit Moschkovich]

“Although black and white feminists can sometimes work together for a common goal with warmth and support, and even love and respect each other occasionally, underneath there is still another message. That is that white feminists, like white boys and black boys, are threatened by us. Moreover, white feminists have a serious problem with truth and ‘accountability’ about how/why they perceive black wimmin as they do.” (Pg. 86) [Doris Davenport]

Audre Lorde said in her open letter to Mary Daly, “Mary, do you ever really read the work of black women? Did you ever read my words, or did you merely finger through them for quotations which you thought might valuably support an already-conceived idea concerning some old and distorted connection between us? This is not a theoretical question. To me this feels like another instance of the knowledge, crone-logy and work of women of color being ghettoized by a white woman dealing only out of a patriarchal western-european frame of reference…” (Pg. 95-96) She adds, “If white american feminist theory need not deal with the differences between us, and the resulting difference in aspects of our oppressions, then what do you do with the fact that the women who clean your houses and tend your children while you attend conferences on feminist theory are, for the most part, poor and third world women? What is the theory behind racist feminism?” (Pg. 100)

“What white lesbians have against lesbians of color is that they accuse us of being ‘male identified’ because we are concerned with issues that affect our whole race. They express anger at us for not seeing the light. That is another aspect of how they carry on their racism. They are so narrow and adamant about that that they dismiss lesbians of color and women of color who aren’t lesbians because we have some concern about what happens to the men of our race. And it’s not like we like their sexism or even want to sleep with them. You can certainly be concerned as we are living here this summer in Boston when one Black man after another ends up dead.” (Pg. 121-122) [Barbara Smith]

“Not all Third World women are ‘women of color’---If by this concept we mean exclusively ‘non-white.’ … And not all women of color are really Third World---if this term is only used in reference to underdeveloped or developing societies… Clearly then it would be difficult to justify referring to Japanese women, who are women of color, as Third World women. Yet, if we extend the concept of Third World to include internally ‘colonized’ racial and ethnic minority groups in this country, so many different kinds of groups could be conceivably included, that the crucial issue of social and institutional racism and its historical tie to slavery in the U.S. could get diluted, lost in the shuffle. The same thing would likely happen if we extended the meaning of ‘women of color’ to include all those women in this country who are victims of prejudice and discrimination … but who nevertheless hold racial privileges and may even be racists.” (Pg. 151) [Mirtha Quintanales]

“I am a wind-swayed bridge, a crossroads inhabited by whirlwinds. Gloria, the facilitator, Gloria the mediator, straddling the walls between abysses. ‘Your allegiance is to La Raza, the Chicano movement,’ say the members of my race. ‘Your allegiance is to the Third World,’ say my Black and Asian friends. ‘Your allegiance is to your gender, to women,’ say the feminists. Then there’s my allegiance to the Gay movement, to the socialist revolution, to the New Age, to magic and the occult. And there’s my affinity to literature, to the world of the artist. What am I? A third world lesbian feminist with Marxist and mystic leanings. They would chop me up into little fragments and tag each piece with a label.” (Pg. 205) [Gloria Anzaldúa]

“If the passage of the ERA means that I am going to become an equal participant in the exploitation of the world; that I am going to bear arms against other Third World people who are righting to reclaim what is rightfully theirs---then I say F___ the ERA.” (Pg. 240) [Pat Parker]

This collection (there is a newer edition, by the way) is absolutely indispensable for feminists, womanists, Third World women and women of color, the LGBT community, or just about anyone else who is interested in progressive ideas.
  • Malogamand
I needed a book for a workshop and this one fit the bill. I have a few books on my shelf that are related to the diversity struggle, but none dive into the topic of women and culture like this one. The voices are raw and full of pain and power. It is a must-have for anyone working in the field of diversity or living in a diverse world (yes, that means it is a must for everyone).
  • Narim
This collection is so brilliant and eye-opening. It provides insight into the individual lives of women under the demographics of sexual and racial minority. As a white, lower-middle-class woman, I haven't experienced the complex webs woven by the intersectionalities of oppression these writers face. By no means can these select women speak for all members of their ethnic/sexual/gender/etc. minorities, but this is an excellent piece of introduction to radical writing. On one last note, I'd like to stress that the reader consider the historic context these women were writing in. It is important to understand that in the 70's and 80's, women of various minorities were not given a share of the Second-Wave stage in the feminist and women's movements. (I would argue that we still shortchange these women even today.) Their words may come off as irrationally angry, blaming, or even hyperbolic; but if you imagine the silence these intelligent, artistic women had to endure for most of their lives, you can certainly sympathize with their heightened emotions.