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The Shakespearean Wild: Geography, Genus, and Gender download ebook

by Jeanne Addison Roberts

The Shakespearean Wild: Geography, Genus, and Gender download ebook
ISBN:
0803289502
ISBN13:
978-0803289505
Author:
Jeanne Addison Roberts
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press; 1st edition (December 28, 1994)
Language:
Pages:
214 pages
ePUB:
1394 kb
Fb2:
1461 kb
Other formats:
mbr azw mbr rtf
Category:
History & Criticism
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

The Shakespearean Wild book. Start by marking The Shakespearean Wild: Geography, Genus, and Gender as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Shakespearean Wild book. Socrates is said to have thanked the gods that he was born neither.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Shakespearean Wild: Geography, Genus, and. The Shakespearean Wild: Geography, Genus, and Gender. By Jeanne Addison Roberts. Plunging into a psychological jungle, Roberts examines the distinctions in various Shakespeare plays between wild nature and subduing civilization and shows how gender stereotypes are affixed to those distinctions.

Jeanne Addison Roberts. University of Nebraska Press, 1 сент. The Shakespearean Wild brims with mystery and menace, the exotic and erotic; with male and female archetypes, projections of suppressed fears and fantasies

Jeanne Addison Roberts. The Shakespearean Wild brims with mystery and menace, the exotic and erotic; with male and female archetypes, projections of suppressed fears and fantasies. The reader will see how the male vision of culture-exemplified in Shakespeare's work-has reduced, distorted, and oversimplified the potentiality of women. University of Nebraska Press, 1 Eyl 1991 - 213 sayfa. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1991. Recommend this journal.

by Jeanne Addison Roberts with 9 citations, including: The Art of Loving: Female Subjectivity and Male Discursive Traditions in Shakespeare's Tragedies. Shakespeare Quarterly.

The Shakespearean Wild: Geography, Genus, and Gender.

The Shakespearean Wild. Geography, Genus, and Gender. Published December 28, 1994 by University of Nebraska Press.

Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1991). Roberts focuses on Theseus’s struggle to come to grips with a central male dilemma, namely, the conflict between his need for the female Wild represented by Venus and his preference for the male Wild of Mars, p. 12. oogle Scholar. 17. See Peter Holland, ‘Travelling hopefully’: the Dramatic Form of Journeys in English in English Renaissance Drama, in Travel and Drama in Shakespeare’s Time, ed.

The Shakespearean Wild : Geography, Genus and Gender. His words conjure up the image of a human being, a Greek male, at the center of the universe, surrounded by "wild" and threatening forces. To the Western imagination the civilized standard has always been masculine, and taken for granted as so until recently.

Socrates is said to have thanked the gods that he was born neither barbarian nor female nor animal. His words conjure up the image of a human being, a Greek male, at the center of the universe, surrounded by "wild" and threatening forces. To the Western imagination the civilized standard has always been masculine, and taken for granted as so until recently. Shakespeare's works, for all their genius and astonishing empathy, are inevitably products of a culture that regards women, animals, and foreigners as peripheral and threatening to its chief interests. "We have been so hypnotized by the most powerful male voice in ourl anguage, interpreted for us by a long line of male critics and teachers, that we have seen nothing exceptionable in his patriarchal premises," writes Jeanne Addison Roberts.

If the culture-induced hypnosis is wearing off, it is partly because of studies like The Shakespearean Wild. Plunging into a psychological jungle, Roberts examines the distinctions in various Shakespeare plays between wild nature and subduing civilization and shows how gender stereotypes are affixed to those distinctions. Taking her cue from Socrates, Roberts transports the reader to three kinds of "Wilds" that impinge on Shakespeare's literary world: the mysterious "female Wild, often associated with the malign and benign forces of [nature]; the animal Wild, which offers both reassurance of special human status and the threat of the loss of that status; and the barbarian Wild populated by marginal figures such as the Moor and the Jew as well as various hybrids."

The Shakespearean Wild brims with mystery and menace, the exotic and erotic; with male and female archetypes, projections of suppressed fears and fantasies. The reader will see how the male vision of culture—exemplified in Shakespeare's work—has reduced, distorted, and oversimplified the potentiality of women.