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Moby Dick; or, The Whale download ebook

by Herman Melville,Barry Moser,James D. Hart,Andrew Hoyem

Moby Dick; or, The Whale download ebook
ISBN:
0520043545
ISBN13:
978-0520043541
Author:
Herman Melville,Barry Moser,James D. Hart,Andrew Hoyem
Publisher:
University of California Press (November 10, 1981)
Language:
Pages:
576 pages
ePUB:
1756 kb
Fb2:
1121 kb
Other formats:
azw txt mbr docx
Category:
History & Criticism
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.9

by Herman Melville (Author), Barry Moser (Illustrator), James D. Hart (Introduction), Andrew Hoyem (Collaborator) . Moby Dick, the White Whale, is Ahab's bane.

by Herman Melville (Author), Barry Moser (Illustrator), James D. Hart (Introduction), Andrew Hoyem (Collaborator) & 1 more. ISBN-13: 978-0520043541. We meet neither Ahab nor Moby Dick until we've been taken far out to sea. This slow build-up is Melville's divine plan. He entices us throughout with brief essay after essay on all subjects and objects and personalities related to the Pequod, whaling, and Nantucket whalers, and whales themselves. If at first you have trouble with Melville's writing style, read on and you will find yourself soothed by his unique poetic sermons.

Moby Dick is a novel by American writer Herman Melville. The work is an epic sea story of Captain Ahab's voyage in pursuit of Moby Dick, a great white whale. A contemporary commercial failure and out of print at the time of the author's death in 1891, its reputation rose during the twentieth century. Lawrence called it "the greatest book of the sea ever written. Jorge Luis Borges praised the style: "Unforgettable phrases abound. Today it is considered one of the Great American Novels and a leading work of American Romanticism

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale book.

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale book.

Home Herman Melville Moby Dick; Or, The Whale. Here be it said, that this pertinacious pursuit of one particular whale,continued through day into night, and through night into day,is a thing by no means unprecedented in the South sea fishery. Moby dick; or, the whale, . 33. For such is the wonderful skill, prescience of experience,and invincible confidence acquired by some great natural geniuses amongthe Nantucket commanders; that from the simple observation of a whalewhen.

Moby dick or the whale. Some years ago-never mind how long precisely– having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen and regulating the circulation.

Home Herman Melville Moby-Dick or the Whale. This novel represented a departure for Herman Melville, a satirical and socially acute work that was to be a further step away from his sea novels. Moby dick or the whale, . Moby-Dick or the Whale, . Some have argued that the book was a joke on the readers loyal to his sea stories, but if so, it backfired.

It is printed in black only throughout, and it is not slipcased. University of California Press, 10 нояб.

Great Barry Moser illustration for Herman Melville's Moby-Dick; or, The Whale. Great Barry Moser illustration for Herman Melville's Moby-Dick; or, The Whale. Added from historical.

This trade edition of Moby-Dick is a reduced version of the Arion Press Moby-Dick, which was published in 1979 in a limited edition of 250 copies and has been hailed as a modern masterpiece of bookmaking. It was hand set under the supervision of one of America's finest book designers and printers. The initial letters that begin each chapter were designed especially for this book and christened "Leviathan." The illustrations, of places, creatures, objects or tools, and processes connected with nineteenth-century whaling, are original boxwood engravings by Massachusetts artist Barry Moser. The text of Moby-Dick used in this edition is based on that used in the critical edition of Melville's works published by the Northwestern University Press and the Newberry Library.This reduced version is smaller in size than the Arion edition and the California deluxe edition, but it includes all of the original pages and illustrations. It is printed in black only throughout, and it is not slipcased.
Reviews:
  • Yllk
This is undoubtedly the nicest edition of Moby Dick I have ever seen. It is a copy of a limited edition with special typeface, and truly wonderful wood cut illustrations. The book is of a size with a nice heft to it, but not too big to hold to read. It is a pleasure to read a book in which the visual aesthetics of the act of reading are attended to so well. I can also give Moby Dick itself five stars, but there are many editions of Moby Dick. Highly recommended for anyone who appreciates the bookmaker's art.
  • Jay
beautiful illustrations
  • Yahm
It's a beautiful edition. Highly recommend.
  • Nirn
Hooray Arion Press
  • TheSuspect
Easily one of the greatest novels of all-time. Ignore the stereotyped responses by reviewers who complain about Melville's odd writing style, the length of the novel, or its circuitous nature. And don't get caught up in the "symbolism" of it all either. That'll come later. My suggestion is that you read Moby Dick for the shear thrill of the hunt. Melville has created a very strange and surreal book, which is a must read for anyone serious about American literature. In my case, I don't think I'd have been able to get through it before now (I'm in my early thirties) and I'm very glad I came back to it. That said, Melville's many chapters on early 19th Century whaling, and the whalemen themselves are interesting in and of themselves for both the historically curious, and the adventure seekers among Melville's readers. On the whole, Moby Dick is constructed like a great tile mosaic; or more precisely, it has the "counter-pane" structure of the Quaker bed-quilt he describes in Chapter 4 (there are many references to cross-hatched patterns & weavings throughout the novel). Moby Dick, the White Whale, is Ahab's bane. We meet neither Ahab nor Moby Dick until we've been taken far out to sea. This slow build-up is Melville's divine plan. He entices us throughout with brief essay after essay on all subjects and objects and personalities related to the Pequod, whaling, and Nantucket whalers, and whales themselves. If at first you have trouble with Melville's writing style, read on and you will find yourself soothed by his unique poetic sermons. The combination of these many short, sometimes non-sequential chapters all forged together, creates a rhythmic ebb and flow of diverse ocean tides, rising and falling waves, and rapidly changing weather. There are squalls, rushes after whales, followed by dead calm and placid tranquility. One forgets what and where he is going on this strange voyage. It becomes difficult to tell whether or not the story is beginning, ending, or somewhere in between; or, if it's a "story" at all! Very odd indeed (unlike any other novel I've ever read). And then we hear a voice; a harsh voice. It is Ahab, stumbling on deck, reminding us exactly what we're in for: vengeance and hate. Pure and simple. Forget "Cliff's Notes" or lame "abridged" versions of Moby Dick; listen to Ahab speak himself: "He tasks me; he heaps me; I see in him outrageous strength, with an inscrutable malice sinewing it. That inscrutable thing is chiefly what I hate; and be the White Whale agent, or be the White Whale principal, I will wreak hate upon him . . . I'd smite the sun if it insulted me" (Ch. 29). These are some of the most amazing lines in all of literature. Ahab continues: "For could the sun do that, then could I do the other; since there is ever a sort of fair play herein, jealousy presiding over all creations. But not my master, man, is even that fair play. Who's over me? Truth hath no confines. Take off thine eye! more intolerable than fiends' glarings is a doltish stare!" With this Ahab avoids mutiny. With this he binds First Mate Starbuck and the rest of the crew to his purpose. Who's over me? Who and what exactly is Moby Dick? Who is Ahab? Read, enjoy, and go with the flow, like Ishmael following his passion out to the intrepid sea and away from mundane land-lubber life. Let yourself drift with Melville for a few weeks, slowly absorbing his amazing prose, letting yourself dissolve into his infinite, timeless ocean, watching, listening, and observing old, mutilated Captain Ahab, peering out to sea, and up into the three tall mastheads at us - his crew - all on the look out for . . .
  • Dolid
Some books need to be read in hardcover. Moreover, some deserve the loving attention and craftsmanship that have gone into this reissue of an original American printing classic. I lingered over this novel, twice, relishing the handset Goudy Modern type, and the illustrations, and the smell of the paper albeit typographic reproduction of the original,and I will return again. On entering the fantastic ( I use that world advisedly - eg, as in visionary, extravagant)world of Mr Melville's version of 19th century whaling on the one hand, and the mind of Captain Ahab through the eyes of Ishmael on the other, one is driven relentlessly forward to the inevitable battle between man and nature and man and himself. Startling imagery, evocative detail, and narrative drive seem to power the story off the page into one's mind, indelibly. A great story lovingly retold in this fine edition.
  • Kage
Well, the novel is Moby Dick, after all, and this is by far the best edition of the authoritative text, so what's to criticize?
The loveliest book I own. The first time I read Moby-Dick, the year after college, was in a crappy falling-apart paperback with someone's scribbled comments in the margins. Reading it again in this gorgeously-set edition is a revelation. Also, if you only read Moby-Dick as a student, re-read it as as an adult. It's far funnier and more moving than young readers usually get. The plot-less chapters become the best part. The best book.