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A Geography of Victorian Gothic Fiction: Mapping History's Nightmares download ebook

by Robert Mighall

A Geography of Victorian Gothic Fiction: Mapping History's Nightmares download ebook
ISBN:
0199262187
ISBN13:
978-0199262182
Author:
Robert Mighall
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (May 29, 2003)
Language:
Pages:
342 pages
ePUB:
1187 kb
Fb2:
1858 kb
Other formats:
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Category:
History & Criticism
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

Robert Mighall, by contrast, demonstrates how the Gothic mode was active throughout the Victorian period, and provides historical explanations for its . This is the first major full-length study of Victorian Gothic fiction.

Robert Mighall, by contrast, demonstrates how the Gothic mode was active throughout the Victorian period, and provides historical explanations for its development from late eighteenth century, through the 'Urban Gothic' fictions of the mid-Victorian period, the 'Suburban Gothic' of the Sensation vogue, through to the somatic horrors of Stevenson, Machen, Stoker, and Doyle at the century's close.

Robert Mighall, by contrast, demonstrates how the Gothic mode was active throughout the Victorian period, and provides historical explanations for its development from late eighteenth century, through the 'Urban Gothic' fictions of the mid-Victorian period, the 'Suburban Gothic' of th. .

A Geography of Victorian. has been added to your Cart. Mighall's command of the primary and secondary literature makes for illuminating readings of many contributors to Victorian fiction, both great and small. Paperback: 342 pages. Publisher: Oxford University Press (May 29, 2003).

A brief history of goths - Dan Adams - Продолжительность: 5:31 TED-Ed Recommended for yo. HBDF Intro: Influence of Gothic Fiction - Продолжительность: 5:28 Joe Notarangelo Recommended for you. 5:28.

A brief history of goths - Dan Adams - Продолжительность: 5:31 TED-Ed Recommended for you. 5:31. He loses his virginity to an enigmatic student with a dark side 'Animals' - Продолжительность: 12:39 QTTV Recommended for you.

Victorian Gothic Fiction: Mapping History's Nightmares (Paperback).

A Geography of Victorian Gothic Fiction: Mapping History's Nightmares (Paperback). Robert Mighall (author). It is Mighall's sharpness and detail which makes the book's anti-essentialism a real contribution to the history of the Gothic in the nineteenth century provides an excellent demonstration of the gothic foundations of detective fiction. B. F. Fisher, Choice, Sept.

Keywords: Robert Mighall, Mighall's, Victorian Gothic, Mapping History's, Gothic Fiction, History's Nightmares. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

This book is a full-length study of Victorian Gothic fiction. Affiliations are at time of print publication. Combining original readings of familiar texts with historical sources, this book is a historicist survey of 19th-century Gothic writing-from Dickens to Stoker, Wilkie Collins to Conan Doyle, through European travelogues, sexological textbooks, ecclesiastic histories and pamphlets on the perils of self-abuse.

This is the first major full-length study of Victorian Gothic fiction. Robert Mighall, by contrast, demonstrates how the Gothic mode was active throughout the Victorian period, and provides historical explanations for its development from late eighteenth century, through the 'Urban Gothic' fictions of the mid-Victorian period, the 'Suburban Gothic' of the Sensation vogue, through to the somatic horrors of Stevenson, Machen, Stoker, and Doyle at the century's close.

Robert Mighall moves us on from attempts to nail the Gothic as a genre

Robert Mighall moves us on from attempts to nail the Gothic as a genre. Such attempts, for the most part, have posited coherence in perceived symbolic, ontological, and, especially, psychological features, and made of the Gothic 'a free-floating fantasy world' (p. xxv), often consciously divorcing it from historical and geographical considerations. In pointing out the seriousness of this rejection of geography and history, A Geography of Victorian Gothic Fiction does more than reassert the fundamental truth that historically specific interconnections of time and place-the ground for.

Reynolds was a prolific writer of popular fiction starting from The Youthful Imposter, published in 1835. Mapping History's Nightmares: A Geography of Victorian Gothic Fiction:27–33; Robert Mighall. Almost forgotten now, during his lifetime he was more read than Dickens or Thackeray; in his obituary, the trade magazine The Bookseller called Reynolds "the most popular writer of our times" ("Obituary" 600). The Library 1973 s5-XXVIII(4):319–26; "George W. M. Reynolds: A Bibliography". Reynolds: Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Politics, and the Press, ed. by Anne Humpherys and Louis James, Ashgate 2008.

This is the first major full-length study of Victorian Gothic fiction. Combining original readings of familiar texts with a rich store of historical sources, A Geography of Victorian Gothic Fiction is an historicist survey of nineteenth-century Gothic writing--from Dickens to Stoker, Wilkie Collins to Conan Doyle, through European travelogues, sexological textbooks, ecclesiastic histories and pamphlets on the perils of self-abuse. Critics have thus far tended to concentrate on specific angles of Gothic writing (gender or race), or the belief that the Gothic 'returned' at the so-called fin de siècle. Robert Mighall, by contrast, demonstrates how the Gothic mode was active throughout the Victorian period, and provides historical explanations for its development from late eighteenth century, through the 'Urban Gothic' fictions of the mid-Victorian period, the 'Suburban Gothic' of the Sensation vogue, through to the somatic horrors of Stevenson, Machen, Stoker, and Doyle at the century's close. Mighall challenges the psychological approach to Gothic fiction which currently prevails, demonstrating the importance of geographical, historical, and discursive factors that have been largely neglected by critics, and employing a variety of original sources to demonstrate the contexts of Gothic fiction and explain its development in the Victorian period.