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Jefferson download ebook

by Max Byrd

Jefferson download ebook
ISBN:
0553568671
ISBN13:
978-0553568677
Author:
Max Byrd
Publisher:
Bantam; Reprint edition (September 1, 1994)
Language:
ePUB:
1208 kb
Fb2:
1274 kb
Other formats:
azw doc rtf txt
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

When Thomas Jefferson assumed his post as American ambassador to the court of France's Louis XVI in 1784.

The result is an intriguing fictional portrait of an enigmatic and powerful personality. When Thomas Jefferson assumed his post as American ambassador to the court of France's Louis XVI in 1784.

As he did with Presidents Jackson and Grant in those magnificent novels, Max Byrd now reveals Thomas Jefferson as we’ve never seen before. Byrd transports us to 1784, as Jefferson, the newly appointed American ambassador to the court of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, arrives in Paris-a city adrift in intrigue, upheaval, and temptation that will challenge his principles, i As he did with Presidents Jackson and Grant in those magnificent novels, Max Byrd now reveals Thomas Jefferson as we’ve never seen before.

Max Byrd is the acclaimed author of Jefferson, Jackson, Grant, Shooting the Sun, and many other novels. An authority on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American history, Byrd lives in Davis, California. Библиографические данные.

Max Byrd, the renowned author of Jackson and Jefferson, brings history to life in this .

Max Byrd, the renowned author of Jackson and Jefferson, brings history to life in this stunning novel set in America’s Gilded Age. Grant is an unforgettable portrait of a colorful era-and the flawed, iron-willed, mysterious giant at its center. San Francisco Chronicle. A vibrant, stunning story of Grant’s last years, but best of all, a gripping tale of ‘the reborn nation on the other side of the wa. -

Max Byrd is the acclaimed author of Jefferson, Jackson, Grant, Shooting the Sun, and many other novels. Category: Historical Fiction Literary Fiction. the greatest Americans. a truly memorable book. Jackson Bate, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Samuel Johnson and John Keats Absolutely splendid historical fiction that resonates with international, provincial, and individual passion and drama. Booklist A real tour de force. Looking for More Great Reads?

Thomas Jefferson Byrd (born c. 1950) is an American actor. Byrd earned a bachelor of science degree in education from Morris Brown College and later received a master of fine arts degree in dance from California Institute of the Arts.

Thomas Jefferson Byrd (born c. He has starred in numerous regional stage productions including the San Diego Repertory Theater's award-winning performance of "Spunk"

As he did with Presidents Jackson and Grant in those magnificent novels, Max Byrd now reveals Thomas Jefferson as we’ve.

Byrd transports us to 1784, as Jefferson, the newly appointed American ambassador to the court of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, arrives in Paris-a city adrift in intrigue, upheaval, and temptation that will challenge his principles, incite his passions, and change him forever. Through the eyes of his impressionable young secretary, William Short, readers watch as the future president builds his dream of America with fellow patriots John Adams and Ben Franklin, while struggling between political ambition and an unexpected crisis of the heart with a woman who has the power to destroy him.

Электронная книга "Jefferson: A Novel", Max Byrd Max Byrd’s historical novels about the third and seventh presidents bring both men alive in ways that only a literary imagination can. -George F. Will, The Washington Post.

Электронная книга "Jefferson: A Novel", Max Byrd. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Jefferson: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Max Byrd’s historical novels about the third and seventh presidents bring both men alive in ways that only a literary imagination can. Will, The Washington Post Jefferson has the organic intimacy of a novel that has sprung full-blown from the imagination of its creator. The New York Times Superb. fascinating in the psychological insight it provides to one of.

In the magnificent tradition if Gore Vidal's  Lincoln and Burr, Max Byrd reveals a Thomas Jefferson  we've never met before... It is 1784, and  Jefferson, the newly appointed American ambassador to the  court of Louis Xvi and  Marie-Antoinette had just arrived in Paris-a city adrift  in intrigue, upheaval, and temptation that will  challenge his principles, incite his passions, and  change Thomas Jefferson forever... Through the eyes  of his impressionable young secretary, William  Short, we watch as the future president builds his  dream of an America with fellow patriots John Adams  and Ben Franklin, and as he struggles between  political ambition and an unexpected crisis of the  heart with a woman who has the power to destroy him.  And we discover-behind the face the complex  Virginian show the world-an enigmatic statesman who  fights for individual liberty even as he keeps the  slave, who champions freewill even a he denies it to  his daughters, and who fights for individual  liberty even as he keeps slaves, who champions free  will even as he denied it to his daughters, and who  holds men to the highest standards of honor-even as  he embarks on a shadowy double life of his own...
Reviews:
  • Sudert
The author uses the same approach of Gore Vidal in his novel about Burr. The major part of the novel is about Jefferson's stay in France. However, the narration is sometimes boring due to the absence of any story.
The facts presented is howver, historically correct and is thus worth reading once.
  • Usaxma
There are some good stories in this book but it is so disconnected and jerky that I even wondered whether I got an abridged version!
  • Marilace
Another Jefferson Bio and I still learned more
  • Kirimath
Through happenstance, I've read three of Max Byrd's novels in reverse order. The first (for me) being "Grant", then "Jackson", and finally this book, "Jefferson". At first, I felt that Byrd's books got better with each novel but toward the end of "Jefferson", I began to alter my view. It is a wonderful account of fictionalized history of Jefferson's time in Paris. They're some constants in each book. There's enough sex, including James Heming's visit to some of the brothels of Paris, to provide a lurid view for those that need such enticement and there's also the book within a book. In this book, William Short, who was Jefferson's secretary while he was this Nation's diplomat to France writes his memoirs of Jefferson. Byrd does a wonderful job with these memoirs, including a description of Patrick Henry's famous speech at St. John's church in Richmond. Furthermore, the book does an excellent job of contrasting very vocal Henry, who wrote little and seldom stayed for the "pick-and-shovel" work of committees and meetings, with Jefferson who seldom gave speeches but could put words onto paper that endure for all time...the Declaration of Independence among them. As a fan of General Lafayette I was pleased to see so much reference to this exceptional hero who is often overlooked. Byrd accurately portrays Lafayette as not overly brilliant but maintaining close ties to the American society of Paris and fueling the fires for the overthrow of the King. As with all of Byrd's work his detailed research lead to wonderful "tib-bits" of history that might otherwise reside only on dusty selves of scholar's holdings. This book is a wonderful account of Jefferson's time in Paris and deserving of a place in any library.
  • Brariel
A fine, readable account of Jefferson's tenure as ambassador to France after the American Rovolution. Shows Thomas Jefferson as a man of conviction, but complete with faults, conflicts and an amorous soul. The story is told through the character of William Short, Jefferson's secretary and is the most readable and historically accurate account of Jefferson and his time I have read. Complemented with references to Franklin, Adams, Layfette and others the book is intriguing and very readable and enjoyable. Not dry or scholarly this book gives anyone interested in "Jefferson, The Man" a novel to enjoy as well as an opportunity to learn more about Jefferson and his times. Well worth the price and time invested.
  • Cherry The Countess
Jefferson is a portrait of the most enigmatic man in American history, framed in the gilt-edged, multi-faceted setting of Paris just before the French Revolution. The subject matter is as rich as Virginia loam, and on it the author raises a bountiful crop of period detail and striking observation. The subtitle of the book, however, shows up its weakness: A Novel. What's missing is the narrative drive. What should be a vehicle is instead a graceful and perfectly appointed 18th-century estate--though there is much about it to be admired, it doesn't go anyplace.
Jefferson's years as American ambassador to France are observed by and reflected from a host of historical characters, some better known than others: John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, LaFayette; the painter Maria Cosway, the slave James Hemmings, Jefferson's daughter Polly, Jefferson himself. The principle burden is carried by William Short, a young Virginian who serves as the Ambassador's secretary. Short is something of a problem: a sharp but colorless observer, he is forced to carry too much of the narrative, but not allowed to develop. At the end of the book we know as much about him as we did at the beginning--that he is handsome, horny, blushes too easily and admired his employer with some degree of ambivalence. Of all the characters, the pretty, fluffy Maria Cosway is the most successful. In her brief affair with Jefferson she reveals a substance and vulnerability one does not expect. The portrayal of the title character will be revealing only to readers who know very little about him. Enigmatic to the last, he shares a lot of the attributes of this book: fascinating and brilliant, but never forthcoming, never resolved.
  • Vetalol
Having read "Jackson, A novel" first, I was very disappointed with this effort. And it takes some effort to struggle through this book. Little insight is provided into the enigmatic Jefferson. The character is not well developed and the book lacks pace, being mired in insipid detail. The members of the supporting cast are presented as effete sycophants or sybarites. Even the illicit relationships lack spice. In all fairness, the book may have spark interest in some as a period piece, but it didn't do much for me. I loved "Jackson", was not impressed with "Jefferson", but I look forward to "Grant" with much anticipation.
Jefferson: Great defender of human rights or hypocrite? You will still be wondering after finishing this novel. This book bogs down in detail and neither grabs the reader with a great plot or interesting characters. Easily eclipsed by Byrd's second historical novel, Jackson (5 stars!). However, the book is full of interesting historical people and is set in a very interesting time (prerevolutionary France). History buffs should enjoy while literature buffs should avoid. Psychology buffs maybe (the author suggests that Jefferson disliked his mother and that shaped his feelings on many things such as his view of England). I think that both the good and bad reviews of this book are fair and on the mark.