cerkalo
» » Resistance

Resistance download ebook

by Owen Sheers

Resistance download ebook
ISBN:
0571229638
ISBN13:
978-0571229635
Author:
Owen Sheers
Publisher:
Faber & Faber (June 1, 2007)
Language:
Pages:
320 pages
ePUB:
1709 kb
Fb2:
1599 kb
Other formats:
doc txt mobi lit
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.9

Resistance is an alternative history novel by Welsh poet and author Owen Sheers.

Resistance is an alternative history novel by Welsh poet and author Owen Sheers. The plot centres on the inhabitants of a valley near Abergavenny in Wales in 1944–45, shortly after the failure of Operation Overlord and a successful German counterinvasion of Great Britain. A group of German Wehrmacht soldiers stay there after men leave to serve in the covert British Resistance.

Acclaim for Owen Sheers’s RESISTANCE A National Book Critics Circle Good Reads Selection Lavishly written. Sheers achieves intensity and depth with carefully crafted scenes and. Acclaim for Owen Sheers’s. A National Book Critics Circle Good Reads Selection. Sheers achieves intensity and depth with carefully crafted scenes and characters. A debut glimmering with intrigue and promise.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. After the fall of Russia and the failed D-Day landings, a German counterattack lands on British soil.

Owen Sheers also wants us to believe a scenario for conquest where the invaders lay siege to the cities. Photo This book provides an alternative history on a British resistance organization made originally by farmers. Again this lacks credibility, since German military success in the Second World War seemed to come when invasions went straight to the centre. Where they lay siege, such as Leningrad or Stalingrad, they failed. The author also describes in some way some details of the 1940s rural life. Page 239: "The entire collection of your National Gallery for example is, as we speak, stored inside a mountain in North Wales.

Owen Sheers’ Resistance is an astonishing and compelling study of human nature against the backdrop of an occupied village

Owen Sheers’ Resistance is an astonishing and compelling study of human nature against the backdrop of an occupied village. Sheers plumbs the depths of love, cowardice, bravery, and the devastating effects of blind patriotism, and in doing so exposes the best and worst of humanity in unexpected and haunting ways. Sara Gruen, author of Water for Elephants. A beautiful, vital novel, about the paths that can lead to war, and out of it. – Nadeem Aslam, author of Maps for Lost Lovers. A remarkable work of speculative imagination.

306 pp. Nan A. Talese/Doubleday. Jess Row is the author of The Train to Lo Wu, a collection of short stories. He teaches writing at The College of New Jersey. Continue reading the main story. We’re interested in your feedback on this page. Tell us what you think.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Alethea Bowser on February 9, 2012.

Книга: Owen Sheers Resistance. Производитель: "Faber and Faber". Opens in 1944, as the women of a small Welsh farming community wake one morning to find that their husbands have gone. Soon after that a German patrol arrives in their valley. Издательство: "Faber and Faber" (2007). ISBN: 978-0-571-23540-7. Купить за 885 грн (только Украина) в. Owen Sheers

Owen Sheers is the author of THE BLUE BOOK, THE DUST DIARIES, SKIRRID HILL and the novel RESISTANCE.

Owen Sheers is the author of THE BLUE BOOK, THE DUST DIARIES, SKIRRID HILL and the novel RESISTANCE. This site is maintained by the author's publisher Doubleday/Anchor Books. His recent collaboration with composer Rachel Portman, The Water Diviner’s Tale, an oratorio for children, was premiered at the Royal Albert Hall for the BBC Proms 2007. Owen was a 2007/8 Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Fellow at the New York Public Library.

What if the D-Day landings had failed and a successful German invasion of Britain had followed? Owen Sheers takes real contingency plans for this alternative outcome to the Second World War as the premise for his first novel, Resistance, and creates around his imagined history a credible and moving story of loyalty and quiet courage.

Owen Sheers, born in Fiji in 1974 and brought up in Abergavenny, South Wales, was the 1999 winner of both an Eric Gregory Award and the Vogue Young Writer’s Award

Owen Sheers, born in Fiji in 1974 and brought up in Abergavenny, South Wales, was the 1999 winner of both an Eric Gregory Award and the Vogue Young Writer’s Award. His first collection of poetry, The Blue Book, was shortlisted for the Wales Book of the Year and the 2001 Forward Poetry Prize. His debut prose, The Dust Diaries, a nonfiction narrative set in Zimbabwe, was shortlisted for the Royal Society of Literature’s Ondaatje Prize and won the 2005 Wales Book of the Year

Owen Sheers, born in Fiji in 1974 and brought up in Abergavenny, South Wales, was the 1999 winner of both an. .

Owen Sheers, born in Fiji in 1974 and brought up in Abergavenny, South Wales, was the 1999 winner of both an Eric Gregory Award and the Vogue Young Writer’s Award. His first collection of poetry, The Blue Book, was short-listed for the Wales Book of the Year and the 2001 Forward Poetry Prize. His debut prose, The Dust Diaries, a nonfiction narrative set in Zimbabwe, was short-listed for the Royal Society of Literature’s Ondaatje Prize and won the 2005 Wales Book of the Year. In 2004 he was writer in residence at the Wordsworth Trust and was selected as one of the Poetry Book Society’s 20 Next.

Sarah Lewis, a 26-year-old farmer's wife, wakes to find her husband has gone. She is not alone, as all the other women in the Welsh border valley of Olchon wake to discover their husbands have disappeared also. With this sudden and unexplained absence, the women regroup as an isolated, all-female community.
Reviews:
  • Fog
Wilfred Owen's searing anti war poem has a counterpoint in Owen Seers' beautifully complex and engaging Resistance. Neither is a fan of Horace's concluding observation: "est pro patria mori..." The Great War's greatest literary antagonist chronicled the grinding physical degradation and relentless waste of life war imposes. Owen's poem had the courage to pull back the curtain that had fallen over soldiers' suffering--blunted by nationalistic propaganda-- in a tribute to the dead or wounded that amounted to an aesthetic howl of rage. Nearly a hundred years later another poet, Owen Sheers chronicles the emotional and mental suffering of those on the home front who are literally and figuratively abandoned by their husbands. Men more attuned to Ovid's blandishments and government palaver than to their families' needs and suffering.

Sheers imagines a Britain being invaded in a counterattack when the Allies' own Normandy incursion fails miserably. Four days after a successful German landing 7 men--fathers and husbands--leave their families in the middle of the night to join the Resistance. It is a planned desertion--in the works for years had it become necessary. It also completely blindsides the wives and women they are supposed to care for and love. Sarah, Maggie and five neighbors are left to shift for themselves--without warning and most importantly without understanding why the oaths made to them mean less than an oath to government intelligence services.

Seers is a masterful writer--beautiful, and poetic description is one of the hallmarks of the author's writing which can do equal justice to a beautiful landscape, a filthy soldier, a terrified housewife. As with his most recent work, (I Saw A Man--also superb) there are no simple, easy answers. The morality of this story is complex and to some extent unfathomable as every action seems fraught with positive and negative consequences. Sarah and George their neighbor Maggie and the Wehrmacht Captain Albrecht who comes to occupy a small, Welsh valley, are all beautifully depicted. Old, young, male, female, British, German: each is, as Maggie would say, knocked down from the pedestal of their illusions. All are in the midst of a free fall. It is only to be determined how hard the landing will be.

When a freak winter snow storm seals the occupied and occupiers inside the valley, new attitudes develop, new relationships form. It is wonderfully well done spectacularly equivocal and therefore seemingly honest. Some reviewers have been dismissive of the stories plausibility--unable to fathom an occupation of Britain. I say if Roosevelt and Churchill could imagine the triumph of Fascism, so too should we try. Other reviewers are no fans of ambiguity. That's fine. I like boiled potatoes too. However, anyone who relishes complex flavors; savory as well as sour (there's not lots of sweet in here) will enjoy reflecting upon the provocative questions it asks: how much loyalty is too much to ask? How much is owed to country, to loved ones and to our selves?

I finished the book over a weekend. The slow, languorous pace, the beautiful prose and challenging morality were nothing less than hypnotic. As Willifred Owen exposed the physical toll exacted by war, Owen Sheers reveals the mental and emotional strain inflicted upon not only those who fight and are desperate for a respite, but also upon those that are left behind to ask "what for?" Resisitance is a terrific accomplishment.
  • Modifyn
This book is an interesting alternate-history story set at the end of WWII where the Germans have occupied the UK. The title 'Resistance' is not so much about an active resistance movement as it is about the resistance to internal and external changes that both soldier and civilian are going through.

The book is slow and takes a lot of time setting up imagery in your mind and throughout the book there are flashbacks showing how characters got to where they are which lead up to the beginning of the book. The author does a good job of fleshing out both the Welsh women of the village and the German soldiers. Nobody is two-dimensional in his book. He makes it clear to the reader why each character is doing what they are doing in this story and it sets up motivations and actions for each individual in the book and then it shows how they all intertwine. One of the main characters of the book is Cpt. Albrecht Wolfram who is a well-fleshed out character with motivations and morality far beyond how Germans are normally portrayed in WWII. I found this refreshing and infinitely more interesting than some Nazi-trope villain who only does things out of evil.

Ultimately, this is not a happy story for anyone involved, even though there are glimmers of hope throughout. I found myself thinking about this story long after I put the book down.
  • Dagdarad
Perhaps the title is a bit misleading as suggested by NY Times reviewer Jess Row. The book is not so much about "resistance" in the classic WWII thriller mode -- no underground partisan night-fighters, blowing up bridges and rail lines and such -- but rather it is about the concept of resistance and the necessity of acquiescence in the face of tough choices. Sarah and Albrecht, the main characters are sane and lovely people, the kind of intelligent, sensitive human beings you wish all your distant relatives were. The other main characters are, for the most part, farm women neighbors of Sarah, in a remote, harsh, beautiful valley in Wales. Two or three of the 6 German soldiers are actually sensitive normal men. The novel is a fascinating hypothetical scenario of reversed history, the unimaginable German occupation of Britain in 1944.

The most gorgeous and heart-wrenching theme is a loving portrayal of community: sharing, helping, taking risks, sacrificing and giving to one's friends and neighbors during crisis, upheaval and loss. The isolated German soldiers participate fully in the developing communal saga in this tiny, cut-off community with the husband-less women. Not since Arturo Perez-Reverte's powerful women in "The Nautical Chart" and "Queen of the South" have we seen such backbone, ethics and power in fictional female characters.

What makes NOT knowing what happened to loved ones create a tenacious and fanciful set of explanations? Why do some people move quickly to adapt while others languish in the past remembrance? Why is "resistance" commonly thought -- improbably -- to be a masculine trait? The women in this book put a quick end to that idea. Sheers is a really good writer. He blends detailed and graphic narrative with sparse dialogue. He lets a reader see what is not said, and can paint a portrait of, say, a man and woman sitting on a stone wall, feeling the tension between them build. The denouement happens quickly, near the end of the book, by virtue of an idiotic act of vengeance by a minor and weak character, but through his cowardice, Sheers brings the story to a rapid conclusion.

The book jacket is quite misleading and inaccurate. There is no "traditional" love affair between Albrecht and Sarah whatsoever, only the suggestion of it, and there is no sex at all. The 2 principals don't even touch each other for the first 225 pages! What makes "Resistance" a good story? Ordinary people reconciling their hopes and dreams with reality, that's what. The dozen people who populate the story are you and me, down-to-earth and overwhelmed by their sudden, devastating and unwelcome fate.

Other reviewers are partly right: The prose is somewhat clunky, overwritten and overly detailed, and Sheers gets self-aborbed at times in a 2-page aside. There's too much about Bach and other insignificant trivia. Is Sheers a better poet than novelist? It's too early to tell, of course, but if any critic of "Resistance" were to pen his or her first novel as well as Sheers has his first in this story, then there would be little criticism indeed. "Resistance" is a good book, a compelling story. It's hard to put down, easy to pick up, and in the end I really wanted to know what happened to all those who remained behind as well as to Sarah and Albrecht, willing to them success against all odds as they fled. The last lines leave you wanting more.
  • Kirizius
I was looking for to this book because I loved the idea of it--England losing to Germany in WWII. Overall, it was pretty disappointing. I kept hoping to be engaged with the characters, but it just never really took hold. The German and English characters never convincingly engaged with each other. The writing was oddly cliché and mediocre. I simply didn't believe the motivation of the main protagonist. Three starts for the idea though.