cerkalo
» » Knights of the Black and White (The Templar Trilogy, Book 1)

Knights of the Black and White (The Templar Trilogy, Book 1) download ebook

by Jack Whyte

Knights of the Black and White (The Templar Trilogy, Book 1) download ebook
ISBN:
0399153969
ISBN13:
978-0399153969
Author:
Jack Whyte
Publisher:
Putnam Adult; First Edition edition (August 8, 2006)
Language:
Pages:
576 pages
ePUB:
1708 kb
Fb2:
1678 kb
Other formats:
txt mbr azw mobi
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.4

Book 1 of 3 in the Templar Trilogy Series. The Knights of the Black and White is nothing like Whyte's previous work

Book 1 of 3 in the Templar Trilogy Series. The Knights of the Black and White is nothing like Whyte's previous work. Despite having a dramatic setting like the Holy Lands during the Crusades, a mysterious secret society, a princess well-versed in the art of seduction and sword-welding men in chain mail, Whyte managed to bore me. I literally had to set the book down twice and read something else before forcing myself back to the Templar book.

Jack’s new trilogy examines the rise and fall of the Knights Templar. Jack Whyte lives with his wife, Beverley, in Kelowna, British Columbia.

Jack WhyteKnights of the Black and WhiteSimilar books. for they were monks: warrior monks, dedicated to the protection of pilgrims in the Holy Land - until st. ore. Books similar to Knights of the Black and White (Templar Trilogy, Knights of the Black and White (Templar Trilogy, by Jack Whyte.

Start by marking Knights of the Black and White (Templar Trilogy, The beliefs expressed in the book are pretty much a mixture of pagan and muslim ideas

Start by marking Knights of the Black and White (Templar Trilogy, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Fine, with historical fiction, you get some slack for a ridiculous story. Besides, the author has to try to fit into the genre that the mouth-breathing fans of Dan Brown have created (truth-bending, exposition-heavy, plot-light, y-fiction). The beliefs expressed in the book are pretty much a mixture of pagan and muslim ideas. He mixed them so well that if you had not studied both you would not know this.

From the author of Uther and The Eagle comes Knights of the Black and White -the first in a dramatic historical trilogy about the rise and fall of the Knights Templar It is 1088. While many French nobles continue their occupation of a violently hostile England, one young knight, Hugh de Payens, is inducted into a powerful secret society in his father’s castle in Anjou

add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

The knight stepped inside and the younger man followed him along the narrow, curving, dimly lit passageway that he remembered from his previous visit, until they reached a curtained doorway. Sir Stephen pulled the curtain aside and passed through into the space beyond, and Hugh followed him, knowing that what he was about to see, if he saw anything at all, would probably bear no resemblance to what he had seen on either of his two earlier visits to this place.

The Templars represent a widely popular period of history, but the roots of their fellowship have been shrouded in contemporary conspiracy theory and media glamou. .this trilogy tells the true tales of the Knights Templar; beginning with why they formed after the First Crusade and why they continued to grow in power and influence. Immediately after the deliverance of Jerusalem, the Crusaders, considering their vow fulfilled, drifted back to their homes.

I found Jack Whyte's first book in his new series to be a page-turner and very well-written. If you are a fan of the Templar myth you will love this book. It is well-grounded in the history of the period, even if it does deal in a fantasy. I can suspend my knowledge of the historical Templars to enjoy a fantasy about them and he is not the first to write such a pastiche as exemplified by Katherine Kurtz's efforts. It does an amazing job of retelling these tales of old, and even though its fiction making it seem so real by fitting the characters so perfectly with what they really would be like in that time.

Shortly after his initiation into the Order of the Knights Templar, Sir Hugh St. Clair is drawn into the turbulence and violence of the First Crusade, until, broken by the savagery and slaughter, he is united with fellow members of the Order on a quest to uncover the true roots of the secret society that has guided their family for generations, in the first volume in a new historical trilogy.
Reviews:
  • Asyasya
Mr. Whyte's Camulot series was one of the best I have ever read, but unfortunately this was not the case with this book. Much was told as a third party narration and was just dull. Very disappointing.
  • Uafrmaine
Years ago when I read The Singing Sword, the first book in Whyte's series on King Arthur, I was amazed at how Whyte re-wrote the saga of Arthur without resorting to hocus-pocus fantasy elements. Whyte's re-imagining of the Arthurian legend with plausible explanations for Excaliber, Merlin, etc., kept me reading the series.

Now he's started a new series about the Crusades and the beginnings of the Knights Templar. I was anxious to start the book, even after reading some of the negative reviews here. Turns out those reviewers were correct. The Knights of the Black and White is nothing like Whyte's previous work.

Despite having a dramatic setting like the Holy Lands during the Crusades, a mysterious secret society, a princess well-versed in the art of seduction and sword-welding men in chain mail, Whyte managed to bore me. I literally had to set the book down twice and read something else before forcing myself back to the Templar book.

It's not that the book is poorly written; it's more that Whyte got lazy with his expositions and allowed his characters to explain the back story. This meant slogging through page after page of conversation in a book set during a dramatic time in European and Middle Eastern history. Obviously, Whyte understood that the average Western reader wouldn't have a great deal of knowledge about the Crusades ... but there are better ways of providing that knowledge than sticking it in the mouths of characters.

I can forgive the clunkiness of Knights of the Black and White on the basis of it being the first book in a series and Whyte wanting to expose readers to as much info on the Knights Templar and the Crusades as possible. But that forgiveness is contingent on subsequent books in the series providing more action and less talk.
  • Mautaxe
It was very good. The author is clearly excellent. The BIG problem is over twenty pages are missing at the end.
  • Fegelv
I enjoyed it ! It was well written and very informative.
  • Phenade
I was expecting a bit more from this book. It was ok. I finished the book, but not without skipping/speed reading/etc. over some pages beginning around the middle of the book. There were simply some elements (won't name them so as to not spoil anything for anyone) of the story that I thought didn't fit. That's when I started skimming the pages as opposed to reading them.
  • Akisame
This Trilogy is one of my favorites along side Robyn Young's Trilogy. Jack Whyte is absolutely marvelous and I read all three. I even ordered the third one directly from the UK so I could get it for Christmas as I did Young's third book in her trilogy of the Templars. I just checked Whytes web site today hoping for more but nothing yet. Highly reccomended. I loved this.
  • Acrobat
Great story telling. Second time reading this trilogy. Love it!!
I really enjoyed reading this book. In fact, because it was such a good read, I could hardly wait to get
into the 2nd in the trilogy. Because of this book I did more research on the setting and found it all
very fascinating.