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Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters download ebook

by Jack Halberstam

Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters download ebook
ISBN:
0822316633
ISBN13:
978-0822316633
Author:
Jack Halberstam
Publisher:
Duke University Press Books; 1 edition (August 22, 1995)
Language:
Pages:
232 pages
ePUB:
1445 kb
Fb2:
1516 kb
Other formats:
docx lrf mbr txt
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

Skin Shows is the first book-length work of literary criticism written by Dr. Judith "Jack" Halberstam.

Skin Shows is the first book-length work of literary criticism written by Dr. Published in 1995, it reads canonical Gothic literature of the 19th century (. Frankenstein, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Portrait of Dorian Grey, and Dracula) alongside canoncial Gothic films of the 20th century (. The Birds, The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2, and The Silence of the Lambs).

Skin Shows is the Gothic book that many of us have been waiting for, and it is every bit as smart as we had hoped it would be. Halberstam’s notion of monstrosity will change Gothic studies for good. The results are dazzling. -George E. Haggerty, University of California, Riverside. From Freud's theory of the Uncanny and, to Feminist theories and reader response approaches (such as that of Norman Holland's), the gothic as a literary outsider has come a long way from its inception as a marginal form of literature to become one of the most studied and complex form of writing.

Invoking Foucault, Halberstam describes the history of monsters in terms of its shifting relation to the body and its representations

Invoking Foucault, Halberstam describes the history of monsters in terms of its shifting relation to the body and its representations. As a result, her readings of familiar texts are radically new. She locates psychoanalysis itself within the gothic tradition and sees sexuality as a beast created in nineteenth century literature. Excessive interpretability, Halberstam argues, whether in film, literature, or in the culture at large, is the actual hallmark of monstrosity. In this examination of the monster as cultural object, Judith Halberstam offers a rereading of the monstrous that revises our view of the Gothic

Halberstam is currently working on several projects including a book on. .Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters. Durham: Duke University Press, 1995.

Halberstam is currently working on several projects including a book on fascism and (homo)sexuality. ISBN 0-8223-1651-X & 0822316633.

Jack Halberstam is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and the author of several books, including The Queer Art of Failure and Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters, both also published by Duke University Press. Библиографические данные. Duke University Press, 2019.

Skin shows: Gothic horror and the technology of monsters more. Judith Halberstam and Ira Livingston Page 12.

In this examination of the monster as cultural object, Judith Halberstam offers a rereading of the monstrous that revises our view of the Gothic.

Halberstam is the author of five books: Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters (Duke UP, 1995), Female Masculinity (Duke UP, 1998), In A Queer Time and Place (NYU Press, 2005).

Halberstam is the author of five books: Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters (Duke UP, 1995), Female Masculinity (Duke UP, 1998), In A Queer Time and Place (NYU Press, 2005), The Queer Art of Failure (Duke UP, 2011) and Gaga Feminism: Sex, Gender, and the End of Normal (Beacon Press, 2012).

In this examination of the monster as cultural object, Judith Halberstam offers a rereading of the monstrous that revises our view of the Gothic. Moving from the nineteenth century and the works of Shelley, Stevenson, Stoker, and Wilde to contemporary horror film exemplified by such movies as Silence of the Lambs, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and Candyman, Skin Shows understands the Gothic as a versatile technology, a means of producing monsters that is constantly being rewritten by historically and culturally conditioned fears generated by a shared sense of otherness and difference.Deploying feminist and queer approaches to the monstrous body, Halberstam views the Gothic as a broad-based cultural phenomenon that supports and sustains the economic, social, and sexual hierarchies of the time. She resists familiar psychoanalytic critiques and cautions against any interpretive attempt to reduce the affective power of the monstrous to a single factor. The nineteenth-century monster is shown, for example, as configuring otherness as an amalgam of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Invoking Foucault, Halberstam describes the history of monsters in terms of its shifting relation to the body and its representations. As a result, her readings of familiar texts are radically new. She locates psychoanalysis itself within the gothic tradition and sees sexuality as a beast created in nineteenth century literature. Excessive interpretability, Halberstam argues, whether in film, literature, or in the culture at large, is the actual hallmark of monstrosity.