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Gentlemen of the Road: A Tale of Adventure download ebook

by Gary Gianni,Michael Chabon

Gentlemen of the Road: A Tale of Adventure download ebook
ISBN:
0345501748
ISBN13:
978-0345501745
Author:
Gary Gianni,Michael Chabon
Publisher:
Del Rey; 1 edition (October 30, 2007)
Language:
Pages:
204 pages
ePUB:
1167 kb
Fb2:
1636 kb
Other formats:
doc lrf mobi azw
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

Michael Chabon’s Pulitzer Prize-winning bestseller, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay

Michael Chabon’s Pulitzer Prize-winning bestseller, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay.

Home Michael Chabon Gentlemen of the Road: A Tale of Adventure. Gary Gianni graduated from the Chicago Academy. newspaper adventure strip Prince Valiant. Gentlemen of the Road is a work of fiction

Home Michael Chabon Gentlemen of the Road: A Tale of Adventure. Gentlemen of the road . .Gentlemen of the Road: A Tale of Adventure, . 3. of Fine Arts and began his career as an illustrator for the. Chicago Tribune and as a network television courtroom sketch. He has received the Eisner and Spectrum awards. Gentlemen of the Road is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents are the products of the author's imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual events, locales, or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay. A Model World and Other Stories. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13. Also by michael chabon. The Mysteries of Pittsburgh. Werewolves in Their Youth.

Gentlemen of the Road is a 2007 serial novel by American author Michael Chabon. It is a "swashbuckling adventure" set in the kaganate of Khazaria (now southwest Russia) around AD 950. It follows two Jewish bandits who become embroiled in a rebellion and a plot to restore a displaced Khazar prince to the throne. The story centers on two world-traveling Jewish bandits who style themselves with the euphemism "gentlemen of the road.

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, sprang from an early passion for the derring-do and larger-than-life heroes of classic comic books. Michael Chabon was born in Washington, . Now, once more mining the rich past, Chabon summons the rollicking spirit of legendary adventures - from The Arabian nights to Alexandre Dumas - in a wonderful new novel brimming with breathless action, raucous humor, cliff-hanging suspense, and a cast of colorful characters worthy of Scheherazade's most tantalizing tales"-Back cover.

Gentlemen of the road: a tale of adventure. The book has extra material, including black-and-white drawings by Gary Gianni.

Michael Chabon, Gentlemen of the Road. A fun little picaresque tale of adventure and daring-do. Jews with Swords? I guess that was Chabon's working title, if Chabon is to be believed. The book features 15 illustrations by Gary Gianni, who also draws the Prince Valiant comic strip. It aids the text in creating the world of the story for the reader. I had no idea what to expect from this book when I picked it up a few weeks back from Powell's after a particularly entertaining reading from the author (not this book, he read from his newest). I do have to say that, after reading three of Chabon's book at this point, that the man definitely has a knack for keeping me guessing.

Michael Chabon's Pulitzer Prize-winning bestseller, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, sprang from an early passion for the derring-do and larger-than-life heroes of classic comic books.

A picaresque, swashbuckling adventure. The Washington Post Book World. They’re an odd pair, to be sure: pale, rail-thin, black-clad Zelikman, a moody, itinerant physician fond of jaunty headgear, and ex-soldier Amram, a gray-haired giant of a man as quick with a razor-tongued witticism as with a sharpened battle-ax. Michael Chabon is the author of The Mysteries of Pittsburgh; Wonder Boys, which was made into a critically acclaimed film; The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, which won numerous awards, including the Pulitzer Prize; The Final Solution: A Story of Detection; and The Yiddish Policemen’s Union.

Michael Chabon’s Pulitzer Prize-winning bestseller, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, sprang from an early passion for the derring-do and larger-than-life heroes of classic comic books. Now, once more mining the rich past, Chabon summons the rollicking spirit of legendary adventures–from The Arabian Nights to Alexandre Dumas to Fritz Leiber’s Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser stories–in a wonderful new novel brimming with breathless action, raucous humor, cliff-hanging suspense, and a cast of colorful characters worthy of Scheherazade’s most tantalizing tales.They’re an odd pair, to be sure: pale, rail-thin, black-clad Zelikman, a moody, itinerant physician fond of jaunty headgear, and ex-soldier Amram, a gray-haired giant of a man as quick with a razor-tongued witticism as he is with a sharpened battle-ax. Brothers under the skin, comrades in arms, they make their rootless way through the Caucasus Mountains, circa A.D. 950, living as they please and surviving however they can–as blades and thieves for hire and as practiced bamboozlers, cheerfully separating the gullible from their money. No strangers to tight scrapes and close shaves, they’ve left many a fist shaking in their dust, tasted their share of enemy steel, and made good any number of hasty exits under hostile circumstances.None of which has necessarily prepared them to be dragooned into service as escorts and defenders to a prince of the Khazar Empire. Usurped by his brutal uncle, the callow and decidedly ill-tempered young royal burns to reclaim his rightful throne. But doing so will demand wicked cunning, outrageous daring, and foolhardy bravado . . . not to mention an army. Zelikman and Amram can at least supply the former. But are these gentlemen of the road prepared to become generals in a full-scale revolution? The only certainty is that getting there–along a path paved with warriors and whores, evil emperors and extraordinary elephants, secrets, swordplay, and such stuff as the grandest adventures are made of–will be much more than half the fun.
Reviews:
  • Unnis
In this book, the second one of his that I have read, Chabon narrates a rollicking adventure in a quasi-historical setting. The title characters, Zelickman and Amram, have been compared to Fritz Lieber's Gray Mouser and Fafhrd. However, they are quite distinct from the older pair. They are, quite obviously, a similar pairing of a small, quick man, wiry and capable of actobatics, stealth and scouting, with a larger warrior, able to deliver a finishing blow. However, elements of their back-stories and their actions during the story itself set them off from Lieber's adventurers. I think Zelikman's favorite method of taking out a sentry could have amused the Mouser.

If they had been set down in this setting at the moment that the story started, Fafhrd and the Mouser could have had this adventure but many of the details and possibly the whole chain of events would have been different.

The setting is not an entirely invented world. It is south-central Asia during our own middle ages, centering on the Khazar kingdom The Silk Road is a time-honored setting for adventures and it certainly works here. Unlike Howard and Lieber and even Tolkien, who set up invented worlds, although each is supposed to be our world in an earlier age. His choice of settings allows Chabon to illustrate the awful fate of many women in what some people think of as "the good old days."

The other characters in the book are a little more three-dimensional than the minor characters in Lieber's adventures and much moreso than those in the Conan books. Chabon's mastery of narrative prose is nearly complete.

Chabon's afterward, where he discusses his writing history and how he has written both mainstream and genre works is quite interesting.

The chief flaw in this novel is that it it rather slight.
  • Mr_Mole
The book tells the tale of two wandering Jew, conmen and bandits who jestingly call themselves "Gentlemen of the Road".
Zelikman - a white, thin and blond surgeon who carries a thin, sharp ,oversized bloodletting instrument as a sword, using his academic knowledge to his enemies misfortune and who is traumatized from watching his family slaughtered during the pogrom.
Amaram - a black, muscular ex-solider who wields an ax named "Defiler of Your Mother", who is still searching for his daughter that disappeared without giving up hope.

The adventures of this odd pair takes place sometime in the 10th Century when the two partners are collecting the money from a con they just pulled (a fake fight between the meek Frank with his needle and the huge ax wielding ex-solider) when they encounter a young man who claims to be the heir to the throne of the Jewish kingdom of Khazria, usurped by his brutal uncle.

This is a wonderful serial novel, in the best tradition of Alexander Dumas and the old time pulp written in a stylized language which I loved and sprinkled with obscure words, archaic references and a solid sense of humor.

How can you not love a book which has the following passage:
"Zelikman executed the difficult maneuver of mounting a horse at full gallop. To outside observes, of this desolate slope, very few, he must have looked as if he were trying to mount Hillel's saddle so much as to perform some foul outrage upon his neck."

All of it which adds to the charm of this wonderful, albeit short novel with lots of twists and cliff hangers aplenty.

This book of swashbuckling adventure is meant to be read and enjoyed - it does not delve into the depths of human psyche and is not weighed down by dramatic themes - it is just a pleasure to sit back and let your imagination loose as you go on an exotic quest of impossible odds with the "Gentlemen".
  • FLIDER
The annoying run on sentences, made this hard to follow, stifled the character development, neutralized the already insipid suspense, and made me regret the purchase price of the kindle book, to say nothing of the premium paid for a flatly narrated for the audio edition on top of all that, and could lead me to no other conclusion than the author must have dictated the prose, hoping to get lucky, or stoned.
  • Shalinrad
This short novel is another delightful romp through the imagination of Chabon. The two lead characters, Amram and Zelikman are doing their own thing in their own ancient time. I could not put in down even though I could sense that Chabon was on a lark and amusing himself with this novel. I enjoyed the ride, nonetheless, and only wish that it was longer so I could dive deeper into the lead characters. I wish that Amram and Zelikman could get the same treatment that Landsman gets in The Yiddish Policeman's Union or that Kavalier and Clay get in his The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay masterpiece. This is a must read for Chabon fans, of course, and perhaps we can raise a crying demand for the 1000 page version of the same story.