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Inspired Sleep: A Novel download ebook

by Robert Cohen

Inspired Sleep: A Novel download ebook
ISBN:
0375718877
ISBN13:
978-0375718878
Author:
Robert Cohen
Publisher:
Vintage; First edition. edition (January 22, 2002)
Language:
Pages:
400 pages
ePUB:
1680 kb
Fb2:
1429 kb
Other formats:
mobi doc mobi azw
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

I picked up Robert Cohen's book Inspired Sleep after seeing it on an older NYT Notable Books list and also hearing about Cohen's prowess as a writer

I picked up Robert Cohen's book Inspired Sleep after seeing it on an older NYT Notable Books list and also hearing about Cohen's prowess as a writer. This book is super well written and delves into topics that affect many of us-raising a family with not a lot of help and the resulting lack of sleep it costs us. I would bet that single parents with small kids and even married couples would enjoy reading this book and get a lot out of it. The book itself is about a woman named Bonnie Saks.

Robert Cohen, Professor of English and American Literatures, is a novelist who teaches both literature and creative writing courses. His books include Amateur Barbarians, Inspired Sleep, The Here and Now, The Organ Builder, and a collection of short stories, The Varieties of Romantic Experience.

Robert Cohen is the author of three novels, The Organ Builder, The Here and Now, and Inspired Sleep. His work has been awarded a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Writers Award, The Ribalow Prize, and a Pushcart Prize. ore about Robert Cohen. Category: Women’s Fiction.

Inspired sleep : a novel. by. Cohen, Robert, 1957-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. L on November 5, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

His third novel, Inspired Sleep, was called a sparkling comic novel of postmodern pathologie. ore than just a brilliant book – it’s a transporting read and "a great fat multiplex of a novel, beautifully written, funny, moving, sardonic and sad, it’s a brilliantly executed indictment of ou. . ore than just a brilliant book – it’s a transporting read and "a great fat multiplex of a novel, beautifully written, funny, moving, sardonic and sad, it’s a brilliantly executed indictment of our biomechanistic age, where there’s a cure for every ache and, more importantly, an ache. A collection of stories, The Varieties of Romantic Experience, was published in 2002; his most recent novel, Amateur Barbarians, in 2009.

These days, Bonnie Saks is lucky to gets four consecutive hours of shut-eye, what with her bed-wetting young son, her unfinished doctoral thesis, her meager teaching salary, and the fact that she's pregnant by a lover about as reliable as her ex-husband.

Robert Cohen is the author of three previous novels, The Organ Builder, The Here and Now, and Inspired Sleep, and a collection of short stories.

399 pp. New York: Scribner. Because few books are as all-consuming as Robert Cohen's new novel, ''Inspired Sleep,'' which may serve to remind readers why they continue to cast their lines into the shrinking lake of contemporary fiction. Bonnie Saks of Cambridge, Mass. is a 39-year-old single mother with two sons, a pretentious, play-writing ex-husband who has decamped to Chile, and a staggering case of insomnia.

At once entertaining and philosophic, Inspired Sleep heralds a major voice in.I highly recommend this book, though, and hope Robert Cohen writes more novels.

At once entertaining and philosophic, Inspired Sleep heralds a major voice in American fiction. This intelligent novel captures early 21st century upper-middle-class dysphoria brilliantly and unsentimentally. 2001 doesn't seem long ago, but the listserv or message board transcript early in the book is a snapshot of a bygone era in online interaction.

2001) A novel by Robert Cohen. With a keen, panoramic eye, Inspired Sleep encompasses everything from the slippery evasions of love to the intricate network of commerce that binds together Wall Street, the pharmaceutical industry, and managed care. Bonnie Saks of Cambridge, Massachusetts, needs help. Her unfinished dissertation is flung across her desk. It gives us a richly satiric and exuberant portrait of millenial America - its believers, hustlers, prospering careerists, and shadow population of lost, sleepless souls - dramatizing one of the most salient questions of our times: Are antidepressant drugs an escape from or a channel to our genuine selves?

These days, Bonnie Saks is lucky to gets four consecutive hours of shut-eye, what with her bed-wetting young son, her unfinished doctoral thesis, her meager teaching salary, and the fact that she’s pregnant by a lover about as reliable as her ex-husband. Meanwhile, Ian Ogelvie, an ambitious young research scientist, is setting up a study of a promising new sleep aid. Their chance encounter forms the backdrop for this richly exuberant portrait of contemporary America, encompassing everything from the slippery evasions of love to the intricate network that binds together the pharmaceutical industry, managed care, and a shadow population of lost, sleepless souls. At once entertaining and philosophic, Inspired Sleep heralds a major voice in American fiction.
Reviews:
  • Not-the-Same
I picked up Robert Cohen's book Inspired Sleep after seeing it on an older NYT Notable Books list and also hearing about Cohen's prowess as a writer. This book is super well written and delves into topics that affect many of us--raising a family with not a lot of help and the resulting lack of sleep it costs us. I would bet that single parents with small kids and even married couples would enjoy reading this book and get a lot out of it. The book itself is about a woman named Bonnie Saks. Immediately you feel for Bonnie as she is poor, has two young active kids, has a marginally successful job as a creative writing teacher, and can't sleep. She lies awake in bed every night staring at the ceiling and the clock. Enter Ian who is a professor and researcher at a local Boston university and sleep clinic. They have a chance meeting, Bonnie enters the clinic and receives pills that ostensibly will help her sleep. Along the way, Bonnie meets various school moms and dads from her kids' school; interacting with them and sometime even sleeping with a few of them. Ian himself has problems---he can't get his research finished, he is in love with a fellow researcher, and his time feels to be coming to the end. A well written book that keeps you interested to the end and sympathetic towards the two main characters Bonnie and Ian. Well done!
  • Small Black
First, I agree with all of the reviewers who commented on how well-written the book was. Cohen is simply an excellent writer who really can string words together beautifully. I was particularly impressed by little touches such as Cress' book report on Macbeth, where he has to write as a 15-year old like Cress might write, and the E-mail exchanges, and the E-Mail exchanges. The dialogue is great too. I really admire his talent. In addition, I don't necessarily agree with those who criticized the entire cast of characters in the book, as if to throw them all in a pot together. However, I did find all the chapters about Bonnie and her world (Larry Albeit, Cress, her kids etc.) to be much more interesting than the chapters about Ian and his world (Heflin, Marisa Chu, Erway, Eddie, etc.). And therein lies a problem: As the novel went on, while there is obviously some intersection between Bonnie's life and Ian's life, it seemed that Ian and his world took center stage more and more while Bonnie and her group got pushed to the sidelines. Not completely of course, but enough to annoy. I would have enjoyed more about Bonnie & Co. and less about Ian & Co. It also seemed to me as if, except for one twist, the ending seemed to fizzle out a little, as if the author lost some of his focused edge. Nevertheless, still a fine novel.
  • Bolanim
Don't be fooled by the jacket blurb or the other reviews -- this is a faculty novel in disguise with all the shortcomings and defects of that genre. To wit: Childish and unappealing characters. Very little action which is always preceded by endless talk and indecision and followed by endless analysis and reflection (especially when they have sex). No character to the right of George McGovern. Stakes too small to bear the weight of the prose. Almost no one in this book actually works for a paycheck; everyone is a grad student, an adjunct professor or applying for a grant. Setting the book in Boston/Cambridge does not help; it is just a Middlebury professor's idea of idea heaven. The heroine's two chilren are rather revolting as is she and her lawyer-lover. The ideas are confused as is the plot and theme, and the ethical issues and dramatic conflict are never fully realized or adequately discussed.
The only saving grace of this book is that the author writes quite well. He can even do good dialogue which is rare in over-narrative academic novels. What he needs to do is work on a tramp steamer or spend a year in Tijuana or in a factory or something to get away from the bloodless overanalytical tepid world of academia. If he had something good to write about he'd be an excellent writer. A big disappointment; hope he will keep writing and do better next time.
  • Silly Dog
An academic novel of sorts featuring two down-on-their-luck protagonists. Bonnie Saks is a Thoreau specialist who's bored by and blocked on her thesis and stuck teaching composition part-time to students who turn in papers with titles like "Is Violins Ever Justified?" She's also a divorced single-mom with two young sons and another child on the way. Ian Ogelvie is a pharmaceutical researcher whose up-and-comer status seems to have evaporated even as his wonder-drug sleeping aid heads to market as a remedy for motion sickness. He hasn't recovered from his lover's rejection a few years earlier and bunks on his sister's sleep sofa after being burned out of his apartment. Ogelvie's new drug works wonders on Saks' life, and her turnaround crystallizes his doubts about the corrupt heart of big pharma. Like many "literary" writers, Cohen spends too much time on his characters' internal monologues and allows too much action to occur off the page. Yet sometimes when he allows his readers to watch a scene unfold in real time, he muffles the emotions of those interior voices, embracing the writer's dictum to show, not tell, just when the reader wants to know what the character is feeling. This is a funny book, but not as hilarious as the best academic novels like Jane Smile's Moo or Richard Russo's Straight Man. Still, once the story kicked in, it kept me turning the pages until I reached the satisfyingly redemptive ending.