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Court Martial of George Armstrong Custer download ebook

by Douglas C. Jones

Court Martial of George Armstrong Custer download ebook
ISBN:
0491024908
ISBN13:
978-0491024907
Author:
Douglas C. Jones
Publisher:
WH Allen (1977)
Language:
Pages:
291 pages
ePUB:
1568 kb
Fb2:
1214 kb
Other formats:
txt azw mobi rtf
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

The Court-Martial of George Armstrong Custer, a novel by Douglas C. Jones, is set in an alternate history built on the premise that George Armstrong Custer did not die at the Battle of Little Bighorn.

The Court-Martial of George Armstrong Custer, a novel by Douglas C.

Jones wrote his first novel, The Court-Martial of George Armstrong Custer, which was soon turned into a television drama, based on the premise that . Douglas Jones died in Fayetteville of obstructive pulmonary disease.

Jones wrote his first novel, The Court-Martial of George Armstrong Custer, which was soon turned into a television drama, based on the premise that Custer had survived the Battle of the Little Big Horn. In addition to his writings, Jones was also a painter in the western genre and a jazz musician. In an effort to keep his work alive, in November 2010, New American Library reissued Jones's Civil War novel Elkhorn Tavern in trade paperback. It is the first of four planned reissues of his novels.

Suppose that George Armstrong Custer did not die at the Battle of Little Bighorn. This historical novel asks: what if Custer had survived the Battle of Little Big Horn? It uses historical characters in a late 19th century setting to tell its story and educate you about details of times long forgotten. Suppose that, instead. People were much as they are today, but different. You may be entertained as much as by other novels from that long-ago time. The author must have studied many books and newspapers of that time to gather the details needed to create this story. The book explains the politics involved.

The Court-Martial of George Armstrong Custer is a 1977 American telemovie produced by Norman Rosemont. It was based on a book by Douglas Jones. The Los Angeles Times called it "marvellous drama". James Olson as George Armstrong Custer. Ken Howard as Major Gandiner. Brian Keith as Allan Jacobson. Blythe Danner as Elisabeth Custer. Stephen Elliott as Major General Schofield. Richard Dysart as President Grant. Nicolas Coster as General Sheridan. William Daniels as Major Reno.

Jones concluded that Custer would have faced court-martial charges related to his leadership and conduct during the battle. That is exactly what Douglas C. Jones did in The Court-Martial of George Armstrong Custer. In the alternate history that resulted (the only foray that he made into that genre), Jones seamlessly mingles fictional and historical characters, while never ignoring the historical facts. About the Author Douglas C. Jones served in the . Army until his retirement in 1968. He has taught at the University of Wisconsin.

Suppose that George Armstrong Custer did not die at the Battle of Little Bighorn

Suppose that George Armstrong Custer did not die at the Battle of Little Bighorn. With a masterful blend of fact and fiction, The Cour. ru 625. Похожие книги

Suppose that George Armstrong Custer did not die at the Battle of Little Bighorn.

Custer's last, last stand. Though if we're voting for Custer ""fantasies"" (as Jones describes his book) Errol Flynn's still way ahead. This time a witness stand, surrounded by, or imbedded in, historical data as precise and dry as any school text. The best parts are the few emotionally charged dialogues that take place in the Fort Hamilton courtroom. The worst are the attempts by the characters to think for themselves and their readers, as in these two examples from the defense counsel's ruminations: ""But George is the kind of man I actively avoid. It's sometimes a mystery to me why I accepted this case"" or ""She tosses her head. Like an unbroken mare.

Reviews:
  • Kardana
I originally read this some 20+ years ago, and honestly forgot the ending; so I decided to re-read the book. Excellent book: well written (although the initial prosecution case is confusing due to references to cavalry units and geography that is not very clear), great character development and fascinating insight into the circumstances of the events. Do not necessarily get bogged down in the details, but focus on the overall story and the personalities involved. Looking at today's current events, the amazing realization is that nothing has changed! The same political forces, the problems with Congressional funding, communication, party allegiance, scandals; problems with supplying troops in the field; ambition, envy, narcissism; the war on Native Americans (US aggression??), etc. That is the great essence of this book.
The chapters after the verdict are the strongest, as the author focuses on the emotional state of Custer and his wife's subsequent coping with the ramifications; a scenario not unlike what we see today with all of our endless wars. The attempt at understanding and visualizing the actual battlefield carnage in the last few chapters is fairly amazing.
Well worth the read!
  • Fenrinos
It is a novel based on an actual event. If Custer had lived, many historians think there would have been a court martial. The author, for the most part, uses historical facts when describing those testifying. Obviously he would have had to fabricate Custer's role, but he does this in a completely believable way. A good story and anyone who is familiar with the Battle of the Little Big Horn will appreciate the author's ability to merge history and fiction .
  • Gagas
Is an outstanding presentation of what "could" have happened had George Armstrong Custer had some how survived the "Last Stand" and been brought up to stand Court Martial. Brings out some interesting ideas and mysteries that anyone interested in Custer will find some answers. I found the book interesting, I couldn't put it down, and well written by the author Douglas C. Jones. I think you would as well.
  • Altad
Read this many years ago, and when questions about the incidents and the things and people that lead to it. Wanted to share the story so ordered another copy. A fascinating read and a great story.

Dee
  • Xlisiahal
very good
  • Cointrius
compelling! masterfully written!! could not put it down!!
  • Pedar
Brian Keith and Ken Howard as the defense council and prosecutor are fantastic in this alternative history. William Daniels as always is fantastic as Maj. Reno. It is logically presented answering the question what would have happened if Custer had survived. Blyth Danner as Libby Custer is both extremely attractive and powerfully presented. It is beyond me why this little gem of a film has been hidden for so long.
This historical novel asks: what if Custer had survived the Battle of Little Big Horn? It uses historical characters in a late 19th century setting to tell its story and educate you about details of times long forgotten. People were much as they are today, but different. You may be entertained as much as by other novels from that long-ago time. The author must have studied many books and newspapers of that time to gather the details needed to create this story. The book explains the politics involved. Custer had testified during the impeachment hearings of Secretary of War Belknap early in 1876. Custer was favored by the Democrats, while Grant was the Republican President. Sherman's brother was an important Republican Senator (Sherman Anti-Trust Act). [Does this remind you of recent events?] Custer would be tried for what he did before he split his command; they had witnesses (p.74). Jones must have searched many old records to recreate the setting for this court-martial on Governor's Island.
The crux of the charges are on page 90: Custer did not determine the size and strength of the enemy that morning. [Other books say the Indian warriors would defend against an attack while the women and children escaped, and then would join them. Waiting would let them all escape, so Custer attacked at dawn.] "But all the Sioux had fled" (p.152). While Custer was criticized for engaging the enemy on the 25th, a day earlier than planned, Colonel Gibbon's forces did not arrive until the 27th, a day later (p.156)! Page 175 tells how politicians were paid to appoint a post trader. (Does this still occur today?) Page 185 tells of newspaper rivalry over the trial. Page 191 says the Massacre at Little Big Horn caused Congress to loosen the purse strings. Page 213 tells of the training problems: unfit pack mules, sparse mounts untrained to gunfire, not enough ammunition to train recruits. Custer's forces were to rest that day, and attack the next day. Their discovery by Sioux scouts changed that plan (p.219). The troops would form battalions in line to locate the enemy. The scouts were as far ahead as possible (p.221). Prior to June 17 the Plains Indians did not attempt a pitched battle; it was strike and run (p.223). Nelson Miles would have done the same as Custer (p.225). Custer's talents are summarized in a left-handed way (p.253). Page 262 has Custer's lawyer guessing about the voting.
You should be knowledgeable about the events to appreciate this novel. This book lacks a bibliography of sources that could provide an education. While fictional, it explains the events of June 25, 1876 to the general reader. Most of all, it absolves Custer by pointing out that if he did not attack until June 26 (the original plan), then the same result could have occurred since the other troops didn't arrive until June 27, a day late!
This book implicitly raises the question: was Custer set up? Did they withhold information on the number of Indians who left the reservation? Custer testified against the corruption of the Grant Administration; did Sherman plan this payback by first putting Custer back in command, then ordering him on a mission known to be extremely risky?