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A Watershed Year: A Novel download ebook

by Susan Schoenberger

A Watershed Year: A Novel download ebook
ISBN:
0824948564
ISBN13:
978-0824948566
Author:
Susan Schoenberger
Publisher:
GuidepostsBooks (March 1, 2011)
Language:
Pages:
320 pages
ePUB:
1761 kb
Fb2:
1473 kb
Other formats:
docx mbr docx rtf
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A Watershed Year is one of the most poignant books I've ever read. Lucy is such a wonderful character and this story of how she finds herself is simply beautifully told

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. What it means to be a mother, what it takes to save a life. Lucy never confessed her love to her best friend. Lucy is such a wonderful character and this story of how she finds herself is simply beautifully told. And that is one of the greatest parts of the book-it doesn't feel like just words on a page, but like someone is brilliantly telling you a story, staight from their heart.

About Susan Schoenberger: Thanks for reading my profile!I'm a native of Newburgh, NY, and a graduate of. .My first published novel,"A Watershed Year," won the 2006 gold medal for novel in the William Faulkner William Wisdom Creative Writing Competition.

About Susan Schoenberger: Thanks for reading my profile!I'm a native of Newburgh, NY, and a graduate of Newburgh Free Academy and Dartmouth College (B. I spent the year after that looking for an agent, and was fortunate enough to secure Jessica Regel, then of the Jean V. Naggar Literary Agency and now with Foundry Literary + Media.

Rosalee was near the bank of sinks. So you’ll call me as soon as you land, right?. Rosalee said in a voice that echoed through the bathroom he stall

Rosalee was near the bank of sinks. Rosalee said in a voice that echoed through the bathroom he stall. I’ll try, but I don’t expect my cell phone to work from there, and Yulia says the pay phones are impossible to figure out, even if you’re Russian. So you’ll call collect, Rosalee said, still shouting. Lucy emerged from the stall with difficulty, hauling out her large carry-on bag and her raincoat and trying to keep her rain hat from falling off her head.

by. Susan Schoenberger. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Written by Susan Schoenberger. Narrated by Amy McFadden. Susan Schoenberger takes us to the softer places of the heart where love-in all its forms and glory-transforms grief into grace. Patti Callahan Henry, New York Times bestselling author of Driftwood Summer. Lucy never confessed her love to her best friend Harlan before he passed away. Two months after his funeral, she is haunted by the power of things left unsaid. But then she receives the first of his e-mails arranged to be sent after his death. So begins the year that everything.

A Watershed Year (Paperback). A Year of Books Subscription Packages. Delivery is free for the UK. Western Europe costs £60 for each 12 month subscription package purchased. Usually despatched within 2 weeks. For the Rest of the World the cost is £100 for each package purchased. All delivery costs are charged in advance at time of purchase. For more information please visit the A Year of Books page.

By (author) Susan Schoenberger, Read by Amy McFadden.

Written by Susan Schoenberger, Audiobook narrated by Amy McFadden. One tragic twist of fate destroyed Braden Healey’s hands, his musical career, and his family. Now, unable to play, adrift in an alcoholic daze, and with only fragmented memories of his past, Braden wants desperately to escape the darkness of the last eleven years. When his ex-wife and son are killed in a car accident, Braden returns home, hoping to forge a relationship with his troubled seventeen-year-old daughter, Allie.

A woman in the midst of heartbreak finds renewed purpose in her life when she decides to adopt a young boy from Russia in this powerful and triumphant debut novel.

Two months after the death of her best friend Harlan, Lucy remains haunted by the things she never told him including her deep love for him. Then she begins receiving emails he'd arranged to be sent after his death, emails that will change the course of her life. One email in particular haunts her -- he tells her he is certain she is destined for motherhood. Thus begins her watershed year.

It is said that out of despair comes hope and in her grief, Lucy finds that the possibility of adopting a child offers her a new chance for a fulfilled life. When she travels to Russia to meet four-year-old Mat she sees in him a soul that is as lonely and lost as hers. Slowly they learn to trust one another and each begins healing. It is when Mat's father comes to America to reclaim his child that a truth about Mat's past is revealed, a truth that might shatter Lucy's fragile little family forever.

A Watershed Year is a powerful story of love, loss, redemption, and what it means to be a mother proving that out of despair can come joy and the beauty of second chances. Includes a reader's guide and questions for book clubs.

Reviews:
  • lifestyle
A Watershed Year is one of the most poignant books I've ever read. Lucy is such a wonderful character and this story of how she finds herself is simply beautifully told.

And that is one of the greatest parts of the book--it doesn't feel like just words on a page, but like someone is brilliantly telling you a story, staight from their heart. Lucy has spent most of her life thinking, not acting. Her watershed year changes all of that. She decides to act and without a lot, or sometimes enough, thought. She just plunges, so it really doesn't come as surprse that it almost ends in destruction. It could have, and probably realistically would have, but Lucy finds strength she didn't know she has and confronts everything head-on.

This book could've turned into sentimental, melodramatic mush, but it didn't. Lucy is ultimately just too realistic for that to happen. Even her preoccupation with saints feels real and true. I'll admit that the happy ending is probably off the charts for realism, but I believe that Lucy's at-heart optimism and faith are what makes it fit and feel real for THIS story. Lucy is someone I would love to know and have in my corner, cheering me on in real life.

To balance this out, the adoption and Lucy's being completely unprepared for it emotionally are extremely realistic. So many people go into adoption without thinking of how complicated it can be--and how love doesn't spring up automatically for the children involved. Lucy has a lot to come to terms with when the ideal of having a child becomes a reality. Though it takes her some time to get her bearings, she turns this challenge into victory, for both herself and her new son.

I loved this book and would highly recommend it to anyone who loves a good high-drama novel. Be aware, though, that this isn't chick lit or light reading, though it isn't oppressively sad, so it might not be a great vacation read, but I do think it would make a good book club choice because there are lots of themes and issues to talk about. For me, overall, wonderful, satisfying and heartwarming read! If you have this in your TBR stack, move it up! You'll be glad you did.
  • Olelifan
Just very recently, I had the not-too-pleasant task of making funeral arrangements for my parents-in-law who died within thirty-nine days of each other...Now that they're gone, there is some form of comfort on the thought that they still wanted to be together even in the after-life, sort of picking up from the fifty-two years they were married here on earth. Just wow!

Not that it is related, and though death was a major part of this story, I have the same reaction: Just wow! My parents-in-law were in their mid and late 80s; Harlan was much younger. My parents-in-law were together for more than half a century; Harlan and Lucy were "together" for only a year, during the time when Harlan was sick. After Harlan died, Lucy did not wallow and "follow" the love of her life. She stood up strong and channelled her energy towards a meaningful pursuit, albeit with thoughts of Harlan still hovering around in her heart and consciousness.

From reading about the mermaid painting in chapter one, I was hooked. Susan Schoenberger writes beautifully. She uses just enough imagery without being too wordy, such that the tone and ambience is carefully set, transporting the reader not only to the time and place and situation, but also to the heart of every character.

This is her debut novel, but the second that I read from this author. Susan Schoenberger, your name is not easy to forget - not only because of the difficult spelling; I will definitely look our for your future works.
  • IGOT
by Andrea Renee Cox

How would you manage the grief and blessings of a watershed year?

A Watershed Year by Susan Schoenberger is an exquisite tale of heart-wrenching grief and the joy that blossoms in the midst of the deepest pain. The author's voice was unique. I particularly enjoyed her perspective (the things she chose to point out in any given scene), analogies (fresh; not cliche), and how she drew on emotions with each new twist of the storyline.

Since I listened to the audio version, I would be remiss to not speak also of the narrator, Amy McFadden. Amy inflected just the right amount of emotion into her reading of this book. She was very skilled at various accents, including Chinese and Russian. I'll be looking for more audio books narrated by Ms. McFadden.

The only reasons I'm not giving this book five stars are because of the mentions of beer/alcohol and the heavy attention to praying to saints (instead of directing prayers to God).

Overall, this was a great story with memorable characters and plenty of surprises. I hope to read more books by Susan Schoenberger in the near future.

I was not compensated for this review.
  • Alsantrius
This story hit home for me on several levels. The character of Harlan, who choses to submit to his cancer rather than to continue the battle gave me better insight into that decision. My father, in similar circumstances, chose to end his life rather than to fight. Lucy, the central character, grieves painfully for Harlan and in her quest to heal her heart she chooses to adopt a little boy. Lucy fell in love with "Mat" from just a small picture in the adoption agent's office. This began an emotional quest to claim her son. The story describes well the fearless and relentless drive that all mothers share to protect and to care for our children. The story includes the reaction of a tight-knit family to a threat, and with a very vivid and true portrayal of the scope and capacity for love in a family.