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Abe: A Novel of the Young Lincoln download ebook

by Richard Slotkin

Abe: A Novel of the Young Lincoln download ebook
ISBN:
080506639X
ISBN13:
978-0805066395
Author:
Richard Slotkin
Publisher:
Holt Paperbacks; 1st edition (March 1, 2001)
Language:
Pages:
478 pages
ePUB:
1670 kb
Fb2:
1590 kb
Other formats:
doc lit lrf mobi
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.9

Slotkin uses Lincoln's flatboat journey down the Mississippi as the basis of Lincoln's eventual political beliefs, but it just doesn't ring true. The journey is one event after another, with social and sexual overtones that intefere with the natural flow of the novel.

Slotkin uses Lincoln's flatboat journey down the Mississippi as the basis of Lincoln's eventual political beliefs, but it just doesn't ring true. Eventually, it doesn't even seem that the novel is about Abe Lincoln anymore, but some nameless boy's "journey into manhood along the Mississippi"

Richard Slotkin (born 1942) is a cultural critic and historian  .

Richard Slotkin (born 1942) is a cultural critic and historian. He is the Olin Professor of English and American Studies at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT, and in 2010 is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences  .

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Abe: A Novel of the Young Lincoln as Want to Read

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Abe: A Novel of the Young Lincoln as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

An entertaining and plausible story about the young Abe Lincoln. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 12 years ago. At the end of this book the author provides remarks that help clarify the context in which the novel was written

An entertaining and plausible story about the young Abe Lincoln. At the end of this book the author provides remarks that help clarify the context in which the novel was written. That many of the chapters of Abe's young life were extracted from what was actually known. There was some co-mingling of people to compress dates and that Abe might not have actually met some of them face to face, but might have been within the vicinity of them during his travels.

Richard Slotkin (born 1942) is a cultural critic and historian Works

Richard Slotkin (born 1942) is a cultural critic and historian. Regeneration Through Violence: the Mythology of the American Frontier, 1600-1860 (Wesleyan University Press, 1973).

Richard Slotkin is the Olin Professor of American Studies at Wesleyan University. He is the author of Gunfighter Nation and Regeneration Through Violence, both National Book Award finalists, and The Crater, a novel. Bibliographic information. Abe: A Novel of the Young Lincoln John Macrae, Owl Book.

Slotkin talked about his book Abe: A Novel of the Young Lincoln, published by Henry Holt and Company. The book is an historical recreation of Abraham Lincoln’s childhood and young adulthood. Mr. Slotkin talked about Lincoln’s struggle to reconcile racism and democracy in his own moral code. He also described the special challenges and responsibilities of writing history in the form of fiction and responded to questions from the audience. Slotkin talked about his book Abe: A Novel of the Young Lincoln, published by Henry Holt and Company. He is the Olin Professor of English and American Studies at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT, and in 2010 is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Education and Career Works.

Read Greenhorns, by Richard Slotkin online on Bookmate – Key Selling Points1. Abe: A Novel of the Young Lincoln (Holt, 2000) was a New York Times Notable Book and won the Michael Shaara Award for Civil War Fiction (2001) and the Salon. com Book Award (2000)

Read Greenhorns, by Richard Slotkin online on Bookmate – Key Selling Points1. com Book Award (2000). The Return of Henry Starr (Atheneum, 1988); The Crater (Atheneum, 1980) was the first work of fiction to be adopted as a selection by the History Book Club.

Award-winning historian and novelist Richard Slotkin recreates the childhood of Abe Lincoln. In a brilliant work of historical imagination, Abe immerses the reader in the isolating poverty and difficult circumstances that shaped Abraham Lincoln's character. Marked by his mother's horrible death and the struggle to keep reading and learning in the face of his father's fierce disapproval, Abe persevered, growing into the complicated and empathetic man who changed the course of American history

A brilliant work of historical imagination, Abe immerses the reader in the isolating poverty and difficult circumstances that shaped Abraham Lincoln's character. Marked by his mother's horrible death and the struggle to keep reading and learning in the face of his father's fierce disapproval, Richard Slotkin's Lincoln comes of age during a dramatic flatboat journey down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans. Along the way, Lincoln and his companions see slavery firsthand and experience the violence -- and the pleasures -- of frontier settlements and the cities of Natchez and New Orleans. Transformed by what he has seen and done, Lincoln returns to make his final break with his father and to step out of the wilderness into New Salem -- and history.
Reviews:
  • Sadaron above the Gods
ABE starts well. Slotkin's portrayal of his early life rings true. The relationship Abe had with his parents and their place in the community sounds very realistic. At this point, I felt Slotkin had a real grasp of what Lincoln might have been like and I was really enjoying this speculative look at the young Abe Lincoln. The trip down the river changed that for me. Slotkin uses Lincoln's flatboat journey down the Mississippi as the basis of Lincoln's eventual political beliefs, but it just doesn't ring true. The journey is one event after another, with social and sexual overtones that intefere with the natural flow of the novel. Eventually, it doesn't even seem that the novel is about Abe Lincoln anymore, but some nameless boy's "journey into manhood along the Mississippi". The best historical fiction gives the reader insight into the characters; this book seems to be trying to make too strong a point, as if it were an actual historical document instead of a picaresque fiction. Like an earlier reviewer, I found this to be less than it could have been.
  • Iarim
I will be quite honest, this is a bad book. The research Slotkin did about many of the often ignored events in Lincoln's formative years and the inclusion of some obscure celebrities of the 1830's is impressive, but attempts to connect the two are ridiculous. There is simply no reason to make up a fictional story about Lincoln's upbringing to make it interesting, unusual, and important to his political beliefs. It is thrown together haphazardly and Slotkin's attempts to occasionally use the vernacular (without rhyme or reason all of the characters and even the narrator go in and out of their unique dialects)do not help the story flow or add anything to the novel. Basically it seems that Slotkin is trying to take elements from Huck Finn, Uncle Tom's Cabin, and The Bible, stir them up and add a little sexual scandal to sell a book. It does not work and really makes for a disappointing read. I think historical novels about famous leaders are great, but there should be a thesis the author goes on to prove in it and the later part of that equation is sorely lacking here--Slotkin wants to show that Lincoln's trip down the Mississippi influenced Lincoln's future politics, but he never really demonstrates it even though he was free to make up any dialogue and events he liked in order to do it. Slotkin tried to do many things with this book, and I appreciate the effort, but it just does not work and going against the general feeling of most reviewers on Amazon, I cannot recommend this to anyone unless it all you have available to read.
  • Auridora
I have been an admirer of Lincoln since my family and I visited Washington D.C. when I was ten years old, and I gazed up at the statue of Lincoln at the Lincoln Memorial looking as if he had the weight of the world on his shoulders but would prevail even if it killed him. As, of course, it eventually did.
Since then I've read numerous biographies and histories of that time, but none have really dealt with Lincoln's childhood. Lincoln was not, except for snippets such as his closest childhood friend going insane and the fear that engendered in him, very forthcoming in either public or private papers.
I read this book because I saw Richard Slotkin on Book TV (not a plug but check it out), and it was clear that he had thouroughly researched Lincoln's early life and based his fiction on what he read.
This book reminds me of the quote, although I can't remember who said it, "The child is the father of the man." I'm no big fan of historical fiction, but this book will hold a treasured place in my library.
  • Brightfury
Brilliant! As a Lincolnphile I have read the good, the bad and the ugly about Lincoln, and Sandburg aside, this is the first book that, for me, ever brought Lincoln to life! Do not miss this opportunity to treat yourself to a literary masterpiece. Slotkin puts you inside Lincoln's skin, and carries you along with the raging passions, and incisive intellect of a great man in the making. More please. More.
  • Kit
This was one of those books I'd be thinking about long after I put it down. My taste in fiction tends to run to tales of twenty-something angst, but I really enjoyed this for a change. I became engrossed by the history and the hardships-a fascinating escape. The author does a commendable job describing Abe's childhood in Pigeon Creek, his journey on the river and simultaneous coming-of-age. Give it a try; you won't be disappointed.
  • Delalbine
To write a book with Abraham Lincoln as the main character you'd think the authour would have to be crazy, arrogant, or incredibly naive. Richard Slotkin doesn't appear to be any of these. He has gone about making an epic work of fiction out of the growing up years of our greatest president in a sane and thoughtful manner, with a humility and an honesty that match Lincoln's own, and though not at all naive Slotkin seems to have been inspired by all the angels of our better nature. The passages where he shows how the Bible lessons the boy Abe received from his mother formed both his mind and his habits of speech are just beautiful. This is a poetic book and an exciting one.
  • Xisyaco
Having trouble getting your teen son to read? Put this book in his room and let his mind wonder about what the world was like before he was born. Does your daughter think that doing the dishes at night is a real drag? Let her think about life in the times of slavery! Historical fiction at its best! Thanks, Richard, I believe I will read the rest of the books you have written!
Mr. Slotkin develops the childhood of President Lincoln through an accurate depiction of life on in the western wilderness weaved seemlessly with what is know about young President Lincoln. The resulting Huck Finn meets Jerry Spence story kept me imagining how these stories helped shaped the adult Lincoln. From his relationships with two mothers and a lack of one with a real father, young President Lincoln is a product of his own wits and hard work. I hope everyone who reads this book will look at their own life in comparison and seek to emulate the efforts made by young President Lincoln.