cerkalo
» » Staggerford

Staggerford download ebook

by Jon Hassler

Staggerford download ebook
ISBN:
0689107935
ISBN13:
978-0689107931
Author:
Jon Hassler
Publisher:
Atheneum; 1st edition (July 1, 1977)
Language:
Pages:
341 pages
ePUB:
1953 kb
Fb2:
1185 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr rtf mobi
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A writer good enough to restore your faith in fiction.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. THE NEW YORK TIMES It is only a week in the life of a 35-year old bachelor school teacher in a small Minnesota town. But it is an extraodinary week.

Jon Hassler's book was another masterpiece The Staggerford Flood is author Jon Hassler's intimate novel of small town life, in Staggerford, Minnesota, where everyone's business is discussed by folks who have known each other all their lives.

Jon Hassler's book was another masterpiece. This was my second romp through this fine book and it seemed better somehow than my first read. The Staggerford Flood is author Jon Hassler's intimate novel of small town life, in Staggerford, Minnesota, where everyone's business is discussed by folks who have known each other all their lives. Staggerford has the aura of turn-of the-century America, long before extended families began their exodus to crowded cities, where distance is an obstacle to communication. Most of the characters in this novel are familiar faces, returning from previous tales, updating their stories.

Since 1977, Jon Hassler’s Staggerford series has entranced readers with its funny and charming depiction of life in small-town America. The New Woman is his latest visit to this Minnesota hamlet. At the age of eighty-eight.

Jon Hassler (March 30, 1933 – March 20, 2008) was an American writer and teacher known for his novels about small-town life in Minnesota

Jon Hassler (March 30, 1933 – March 20, 2008) was an American writer and teacher known for his novels about small-town life in Minnesota. He held the positions of Regents Professor Emeritus and Writer-in-Residence at St. John's University in Collegeville, Minnesota. Jon Hassler was born in Minneapolis, but spent his formative years in the small Minnesota towns of Staples and Plainview, where he graduated from high school

Completed Staggerford this morning at 9:15.

Completed Staggerford this morning at 9:15. The most satisfying thing I've done since playing high school football. In the spring of 1975, an unknown Minnesota teacher named Jon Hassler decided to take a sabbatical and fulfill his lifelong dream of writing a novel. A year later, Hassler typed the final page of Staggerford-a book that has won a cherished place as a classic novel of small-town life in America.

Author Jon Hassler was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota on March 30, 1933.

A writer good enough to restore your faith in fiction. Author Jon Hassler was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota on March 30, 1933. He received his bachelor's degree from St. John's University in 1955 before going on to the University of North Dakota for his master's degree. After graduating from college, he taught high school English for the next 10 years. In 1970, while teaching at Brainerd Community College, he became interested in writing fictional stories.

Jon Hassler’s most popular book is Staggerford. Books by Jon Hassler. Showing 24 distinct works. Staggerford by. Jon Hassler.

Jon Hassler ho had actually read the book. For seven weeks Miles had watched Lee reading the book in study hall, forming his heavy lips around each word. Today, after hearing the story from Lee, five other boys stood up in the front of the room and told the plot to the class, but a question or two from Miles revealed that four of them had never read it, and he gave them F’s.

Staggerford A Novel By.

The classic novel of a small Minnesota town-and of one school teacher who calls it home This utterly charming, deeply poignant debut remains perhaps the signature achievement of beloved novelist Jon Hassler-once hailed by The New York Times as a writer good enough to restore your faith in fiction. It’s the story of a week in the life of Miles Pruitt, a bachelor who teaches high school English in Staggerford, Minnesota.

"A writer good enough to restore your faith in fiction."THE NEW YORK TIMESIt is only a week in the life of a 35-year old bachelor school teacher in a small Minnesota town. But it is an extraodinary week, filled with the poetry of living, the sweetness of expectation, and the glory of surprise that can change a life forever...."Absolutely smashing....An altogether successful work, witty, intelligent, compassionate."THE CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER
Reviews:
  • Buzatus
This book has much to entertain, especially for teachers, since it's excellent at capturing the inanities of school administration and students and colleagues, as well as other comedies of small town life. The characters are vivid, although much of this relies on long, not terribly realistic (but very funny) dialogue. The comic elements are stellar. BUT ... the Kindle version I read is absolutely riddled with typos. For example, the word "die" -- which appears pretty often, a theme of the book -- has been substituted throughout with "the." And other strange typos appear frequently. Maybe it was automatically scanned into eBook form and never proofread, or proofread by someone in China, or by someone who hates the publisher, or by someone who wants all eBooks to disappear from the face of the Earth. It also suffers from other editorial clumsiness -- a past tense narrative using terms like "yesterday" and "tomorrow," for example, and a bit too much reliance on sudden convenient journal writing. The most annoying thing about it to me, however, is the ending, which has left me unwilling to put myself in the hands of this author again anytime soon. I would have said this had potential to be a pretty funny TV series, but not the way it ends. I suppose that the Coen brothers could make something of it. Imagine "Fargo" with the woman cop shot dead before the end, and everything leading up to that point suggesting a warm small town comedy. No hapless murdering kidnappers or bodies in wood chippers to give you an idea of what you're in for, though I guess there are clues scattered throughout the text that death is going to be a Thing (for example, a character nicknamed "Thanatopsis" takes weird delight in just about everything, even bad stuff ... but if that was meant to be effective symbolism, it's in the wrong kind of book). So personally I'd call this a good read up until about 90% of the way through.
  • RuTGamer
I had made an attempt at reading this months ago, and gave up to read other books that seemed more appealing--a mistake I rectified when I tried again. Within a few pages, I was drawn into Miles' life and those of the people around him. I love Jon Hassler's writing style, fine descriptions, great use of metaphor, quirky, but not caricatured characters, and funny, realistic small-town dialogue.

What I hated was the lack of even rudimentary editing. After seeing the word "die" changed to "the" for the fourth time, and many other inexplicable errors (chaise lounge is spelled "longue"), it occurred to me that this was an example of spell check and auto correct gone wild. I will definitely read his other books, but that lack of attention to the editing is going to bother me,.It really makes the publisher look shoddy, as well.
  • Road.to sliver
The author died, and I read an article about him in "America" magazine. I did not know of him or his books. I got Staggerford for my Kindle, at modest cost.
I mostly read non-fiction but appreciate good fiction. This is good fiction, well-written, unusual, surprising at the end. It's about a high school teacher in a small Minnesota town, greatly displeased with his life but able to look at it with a wry sense of humor.
The characters are fleshed out and remarkable.
My favorite book, for the quality of the writing, is "Cold Mountain," which was one of the few books I did not want to end.
I would encourage anyone to read it. I gave it four stars instead of five because I would only give out five stars a few times in a reading lifetime.
  • Samut
Such a deceptively simple book - with writing and characters that are the opposite of ornate, fussy, pretentious. A week in the life of a 35-year-old bachelor high school teacher, which also encompasses his life. We become acquainted with his friends, his students, and the plain grace that he extends to all of them. Many of the situations are humorous - until they're not. A book with more depth than you expect from the writing style and everyday situations - very satisfying.
  • Delaath
One week in the life of high school English teacher Miles Pruitt. Delightful characters in this small Minnesota town. Quirky people whom you grow to love over the course of the week. I laughed out loud more than once and also cried. It's a moving book that I will read again. Can't believe it took me so long to discover it! Oh, did I mention it's beautifully written? Indeed.
  • Unnis
Almost a great novel. Certainly the best of the genre: English teacher from small town writing about an English teacher from a small town. Great characterizations, dialogue, humor and pathos mixed. Ending seems problematic to me, just too jarring from what has gone before . . . but I have gone ahead and ordered the next three of Hassler's books, so I reckon that is a recommendation of the best sort. Of course, I was an English teacher in a small town, so that probably has something to do with it.
  • Tinavio
This is the story of one man, a teacher, who taught at the local high school. This was a small town, where most of the town knew each other or about one another. It shows the hope of one teacher to help kids who have mental illness in their family, and very little hope of getting out of an impoverished home life. This was an engaging, comical at times, serious most times, story of this town, Staggerford.
I really liked this book, and the characters, and I would have given it 5 stars except I did not like the end, at all! It was almost as if the writer just got tired of writing the book and just decided to end it abruptly. Other than that, it was great. I'm from a small town and this just reminded me of home. They way he describes the characters, and their idiosyncrasies is spot on.