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Not-Knowing: The Essays and Interviews of Donald Barthelme download ebook

by Donald Barthelme

Not-Knowing: The Essays and Interviews of Donald Barthelme download ebook
ISBN:
0679741208
ISBN13:
978-0679741206
Author:
Donald Barthelme
Publisher:
Vintage (January 26, 1999)
Language:
Pages:
352 pages
ePUB:
1509 kb
Fb2:
1168 kb
Other formats:
mbr lrf lrf doc
Category:
Essays & Correspondence
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.9

Not-Knowing: The Essays and Interviews of Donald Barthelme (1997) is a collection of essays and interviews with Donald Barthelme

Not-Knowing: The Essays and Interviews of Donald Barthelme (1997) is a collection of essays and interviews with Donald Barthelme. The question so often asked of modern painting, What is it?, contains more than the dull skepticism of the man who is not going to have the wool pulled over his eyes. It speaks of a fundamental placement in relation to the work, that of a voyager in the world coming upon a strange object

When Donald Barthelme died at the age of 54, he was perhaps the most imitated (if not emulated) practitioner of American literature

When Donald Barthelme died at the age of 54, he was perhaps the most imitated (if not emulated) practitioner of American literature. Caustic, slyly observant, transgressive, verbally scintillating, Barthelme's essays, stories, and novels redefined a generation of American letters and remain unparalleled for the way they capture our national pastimes and obsessions, but most of all for the way they caputure the strangeness of life. Not-Knowing amounts to the posthumous manifesto of one of our premier literary modernists

I always got Donald Barthelme confused with his brother, Frederick Barthelme, and Donald Antrim (no .

I always got Donald Barthelme confused with his brother, Frederick Barthelme, and Donald Antrim (no relation). It didn't help that they all wrote for the New Yorker, which also has about five hundred writers named Ian writing for them (none of them any relation to Donald, Frederick, or Donald, that I know of). So when I picked up this book of nonfiction work, I had no idea whether I had read any of Donald's fiction (no). Something that continually gets me charged up about the seemingly ossified possibilities of fiction every time I read it.

Postmodernist icon Donald Barthelme (April 7, 1931–July 23, 1989) was not only one of. .

Donald Barthelme (April 7, 1931 – July 23, 1989) was an American short story writer and novelist known for his playful, postmodernist style of short fiction

Donald Barthelme (April 7, 1931 – July 23, 1989) was an American short story writer and novelist known for his playful, postmodernist style of short fiction.

Other Books by Donald Barthelme. City Life of the inevitability of not knowing the answers. Sixty Stories, it was once said, was Barthelme’s attempt to establish his canon. Forty Stories, then, might be seen as his attempt to enlarge it. Flying to America: 45 More Stories, which contains every story not collected in Sixty Stories and Forty Stories, twelve stories never collected in any of the individual published volumes, and three previously unpublished stories, is a crucial addition - perhaps the crucial addition - to his existing canon. of the inevitability of not knowing the answers.

Donald Barthelme was the Stephen Sondheim of haute fiction-a dexterous assembler of witty, mordant, intricate devices that, once exploded, exposed the sawdust and stuffing of traditional forms. His stories weren’t finely rendered portrait studies in human behavior or autobiographical reveries à la Johns Updike and Cheever, but a row of boutiques showcasing his latest pranks, confections, gadgets, and Max Ernst/Monty Python–ish collages

HOW COME YOU write the way you do? an apprentice writer in my Johns Hopkins workshop once disingenuously asked Donald Barthelme, who was visiting.

The Essays and Interviews of Donald Barthelme. Barthelme's many other pieces for the magazine waver lamely between its characteristic wryness and his own fabulist flair, though there is one happy, humorous piece that purports to answer a Writer's Digest questionnaire about his drinking habits.

Donald Barthelme to have orchestrated the 1986 attack on Dan Rather, citing unusual passages in Barthelme's writing .

When Donald Barthelme died at the age of 54, he was perhaps the most imitated (if not emulated) practitioner of American literature. Caustic, slyly observant, transgressive, verbally scintillating, Barthelme's essays, stories, and novels redefined a generation of American letters and remain unparalleled for the way they capture our national pastimes and obsessions, but most of all for the way they caputure the strangeness of life. Not-Knowing amounts to the posthumous manifesto of one of our premier literary modernists. Here are Barthelme's thoughts on writing (his own and others); his observations on art, architecture, film, and city life; interviews, including two never previously published; and meditations on everything from Superman III to the art of rendering "Melancholy Baby" on jazz banjolele. This is a rich and eclectic selection of work by the man Robert Coover has called "one of the great citizens of contemporary world letters."  
Reviews:
  • skyjettttt
Great stuff. Does not seem dated at all!
  • Dorizius
The remaining chunks of the master's prose reconnoiterings are brought to light here. Essays, reviews, pieces written on assignment ... what amazes is how closely Barthelme's nonfiction resembles his classic short stories. If you already own "40 Stories" and "60 Stories" and still find yourself GASPING for more Barthelme air ... this is for you.