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Yiddish Tales (The Modern Jewish Experience) download ebook

by Helena Frank,Moses Rischin

Yiddish Tales (The Modern Jewish Experience) download ebook
ISBN:
0405067550
ISBN13:
978-0405067556
Author:
Helena Frank,Moses Rischin
Publisher:
Ayer Co Pub; Facsimile edition (June 1, 1975)
Language:
Pages:
599 pages
ePUB:
1638 kb
Fb2:
1319 kb
Other formats:
rtf txt mbr azw
Category:
Dramas & Plays
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

Title: Yiddish Tales. Translator: Helena Frank

Title: Yiddish Tales. Translator: Helena Frank. Release Date: September 12, 2010. The tales given here are by no means all equal in literary merit, but they have each its special note, its special echo from that strangely fascinating world so often quoted, so little understood (we say it against ourselves), the Russian Ghetto-a world in the passing, but whose more precious elements, shining, for all who care to see them, through.

These 48 tales collected from magazines & papers are full of wit & humor, clever thinking, weighty traditions, struggle . Short biographical sketches precede each writer's stories, which were translated by Helena Frank.

These 48 tales collected from magazines & papers are full of wit & humor, clever thinking, weighty traditions, struggle & sadness: a full spectrum of the Jewish Ghetto life from which they sprang in Russia, Poland, Lithuania, Bessarabia, & America. First published by The Jewish Publication Society in 1912, these works are from 20 authors, including Isaac Perez, Shalom Asch, Mordecai Spektor, Sholom-Alechem, Abraham Raisin, David Pinski, Judah Steinberg.

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The Wexler Oral History Project has collected many stories about the Jewish immigrant experience, both to the United States and to other parts of the world.

oc. iddishbookcenter. The Wexler Oral History Project has collected many stories about the Jewish immigrant experience, both to the United States and to other parts of the world. Some are told by the immigrants themselves, some by children and grandchildren who grew up straddling old country and new. Together, they tell a larger story about both the significant challenges faced by Jews, and the strength and resilience that helped them become such a vital part of the American culture.

Translated by helena frank. Yes, and we have collected, largely from magazines and papers and unbound booklets, forty eight tales by twenty different authors. Philadelphia the jewish publication society of america 1912. Yes, and we have collected, largely from magazines and papers and unbound booklets, forty eight tales by twenty different authors Continue reading book .

Yiddish Tales (1912) has been added to your Cart

Yiddish Tales (1912) has been added to your Cart. True, the stories are not cheerful, as the Jewish Publication Society, the prestigious publishers, recognize, but they are very insightful as to character, and life generally, and they are poignant and passionate. The book introduces each series of books by giving a short introduction to the author. Many of the tales are by authors who may be unfamiliar to the reader.

Tales of humour and drama, tragedy and pathos set mostly in the Jewish communities of 19th-century eastern Europe, Russia, and the Ukraine. Translated from Yiddish by Helena Frank. Summary by Adrian Praetzellis). This collection contains: Preface and Acknowledgements by Helena Frank The Misfortune by Reuben Asher Braudes Earth of Palestine by Jehalel A Woman's Wrath by I. L. Peretz A Treasure by I. Peretz It Is Well by I. Peretz Whence a Proverb by I. Peretz An Original Strike by Mordechai Spektor A Gloomy Wedding by Mordechai Spektor Poverty by Mordechai.

Connecting the Jewish experience with colonialism to mobility and exchange. This nuanced and thoughtful collection opens up the study of Jews and colonialism, for the first time, to comprehensive scholarly scrutiny. Building on much new work on North Africa and the Middle East―and drawing on British, French, German, Polish and Russian sources―the volume addresses head-on the disputable place of Jews in colonial history and of colonialism in Jewish history.

Published 1975 by Arno Press in New York. The Modern Jewish experience. E8 Yi4. The Physical Object.

Reviews:
  • Cerar
Originally published in 1911, this book precedes the Russian Revolution by some years. All these stories are set in the misery of the Eastern European ghetto and reflect the hopelessness of that time and place.

Life is hard for a man, especially a Jew. There is one exception. On Shabbat eve, with candles glowing, his wife and children surrounding him in their best clothing—a man is a king. Then he can sing and drink wine and enjoy life. No matter that tomorrow his labor start again, for now he is a king.

It's that spirit that permeates the stories, even if unspoken.Whether the stories are lighthearted or tragic, easy to understand or completely opaque, underlying them all is a sense of what Jewish life is about.
  • Akelevar
This collection of forty-eight short stories by twenty different authors is a splendid book for people of all faiths. True, the stories are not cheerful, as the Jewish Publication Society, the prestigious publishers, recognize, but they are very insightful as to character, and life generally, and they are poignant and passionate. Amazon sells the book for free because the book's copyright - it having been published by JPS in 1912, has expired. The book introduces each series of books by giving a short introduction to the author. Many of the tales are by authors who may be unfamiliar to the reader. But there are four stories by Isaac Lob Peretz, five by Sholom Aleichem, four by Shalom Asch, and the very moving tale by David Frischman "Three Who Ate." Most of the tales are excellent.
  • Mavegar
You should read these, but be prepared. Really WANT to read them.
I've read Sholem Aleichem, I've read Isaac Bashevis Singer. Jewish storytelling fascinates me, in a way, and that's odd, especially since I'm basically Lutheran.
These stories may be the height of Yiddish culture; if so, it's my fault for not being able to relate more. Some people, deeper than me --- and I'm sure there are many who are --- will probably find these to be wonderfully full of color and meaning and the whole philosophy, the ethos (?) of their traditions and being.
Me, I found them to be wonderful in many ways. Very descriptive, very colorful, very exotic, I would even say. Therein, however, also lay the problem for me. After a while, you think, my gosh, are they EVER going to get to the story?
Maybe it loses something in the translation, or maybe I am too shallow.
Still, I will keep reading these kinds of things, but in small doses until I get smarter.
  • Falya
Some of these stories brought tears to my eyes. Enjoyed the chance to read stories from authors I'd read before, authors I'd heard of, and authors who were new to me. Love Sholem Aleichem, and was moved by Loeb Schapiro's "If It Was a Dream," which was, like many of the other stories, so eloquent with the understated.
  • Burirus
This book of short stories, first published 100 years ago, is a fascinating kaleidoscope. The translations are excellent and read well. Since the stories are by a large variety of authors with many different points of view, they are not all equally good. They range from tear-jerkers to humor, and give a real feeling for what life was like for Jews both in Europe and in the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • lolike
These translations from the early twentieth century capture wonderfully the flavor of these Yiddish stories. Some of the writers are almost forgotten, but they are well in the tradition of late-nineteenth-century European literature, but often with a wry twist approaching "beatness."
  • huckman
I bought this book for my Kindle because of the inclusion of Sholem Asch story. I have found not only that story satisfying but many of the other stories very interesting. I would highly recommend it. The price is right also.
Not a very good translation. I was looking forward to this book, but I went back to wishing they'd re-issue "Treasury of Jewish Folklore" instead.